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Trade Talk: Jones, Brewers, Cutch, Holland

MLB.com

The July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline has come and gone, but the transaction wire could stay hot ahead of Aug. 31. That date is important because clubs acquiring new players via trade must have those players on their 40-man roster by then in order for that player (or players) to be eligible for its postseason roster. Teams can acquire players after Sept. 1, but those players would not be eligible to play with that team in the playoffs. 

Throughout August, it's not uncommon for high-profile players to be placed on waivers. In fact, most clubs will place a sizable portion of their Major League roster on waivers to gauge interest for their talent ahead of the offseason. 

The July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline has come and gone, but the transaction wire could stay hot ahead of Aug. 31. That date is important because clubs acquiring new players via trade must have those players on their 40-man roster by then in order for that player (or players) to be eligible for its postseason roster. Teams can acquire players after Sept. 1, but those players would not be eligible to play with that team in the playoffs. 

Throughout August, it's not uncommon for high-profile players to be placed on waivers. In fact, most clubs will place a sizable portion of their Major League roster on waivers to gauge interest for their talent ahead of the offseason. 

When a waiver claim is placed, the player's original club has three options:
• Work out a standard trade with the claiming club within 48 hours
• Allow the player -- and all money remaining on his contract -- to go to the claiming club with no return
• Pull the player back off waivers

A player who is pulled back off waivers can be placed on trade waivers a second time, but at that point the waiver request becomes irrevocable. If a player passes through waivers unclaimed, he can then be traded to any club, free of restriction (though all 40-man-roster players in the trade must clear waivers before being dealt).

Glossary: Trade Waivers & Aug. 31 'Deadline'

With that in mind, here is the latest trade buzz: 

Jones reportedly clears revocable waivers, now eligible to be traded anywhere
Aug. 16: Adam Jones has passed through revocable waivers unclaimed, sources told MLB Network insider Jon Heyman, making the Orioles outfielder eligible to be traded to any of the other 29 teams.

Of course, a deal remains unlikely, as Jones used his 10-and-5 rights to veto a trade to the Phillies prior to the July 31 non-waiver Deadline, with family, friends and his community programs in Baltimore among the major reasons why, per Heyman.

Philadelphia's plan to have Jones platoon with lefty-swinging Nick Williams in right field may also have been a factor in Jones' refusal to approve a deal there, though the veteran hasn't indicated whether that is the case.

According to Heyman, the O's recently approached the Yankees to gauge their interest in Jones with Aaron Judge, Gary Sanchez and Clint Frazier on the disabled list, but New York is close to the luxury-tax threshold and would like to save that money in case any additional rotation solutions arise.

The Indians are another potential landing spot for Jones, as they are missing Leonys Martin, Lonnie Chisenhall and Tyler Naquin, and have received lackluster production from Melky Cabrera (.695 OPS), Brandon Guyer (.663 OPS), Rajai Davis (.601 OPS) and Greg Allen (.580 OPS).

Video: BAL@NYY: Jones on invoking no-trade clause with O's

With Nelson unlikely to return, will Brewers trade for starter?
Aug. 15: The Brewers have held out hope that Jimmy Nelson, who has missed this entire season while recovering from right shoulder surgery, would be a solution to the club's rotation problems after coming off the disabled list. But general manager David Stearns and manager Craig Counsell acknowledged Wednesday that Nelson is unlikely to pitch for the team this year.

Tweet from @AdamMcCalvy: Craig Counsell on Jimmy Nelson: ���Jimmy pitching for us this year is unlikely. And that���s not due to a setback of any nature, that���s just due to the pace of his rehab right now.��� pic.twitter.com/lPiSozK3F8

Faced with that reality, Stearns is keeping open the possibility of swinging a trade for a starter.

"There's still a lot of waiver activity," Stearns said. "Guys are getting through. Tough to handicap at this point, but we're looking, and if there's something that makes sense that we think materially impacts this team, we'll do it."

Tweet from @AdamMcCalvy: Stearns on prospect of trading for starter before Sept. 1: "There's still a lot of waiver activity. Guys are getting through. Tough to handicap at this point, but we're looking, and if there's something that makes sense that we think materially impacts this team, we'll do it."

The Brewers were one of the more active teams on the trade market before the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline, acquiring reliever Joakim Soria, third baseman Mike Moustakas and second baseman Jonathan Schoop.

They also reportedly discussed deals for a number of starters, including the Mets' Zack Wheeler and the Reds' Matt Harvey, but ultimately didn't come away with any of them.

Milwaukee is unlikely to have a chance to trade for Wheeler at this point, but Harvey, Twins right-hander Ervin Santana, Blue Jays right-hander Marco Estrada and White Sox right-hander James Shields could be available.

The question, of course, is whether any of those hurlers represents a significant upgrade over Zach Davies, who is nearing the conclusion of his rehab assignment.

Cutch, Holland among top August trade candidates
Aug. 14: The market has been relatively quiet since the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline, with Mike Fiers, Fernando Rodney and Justin Bour representing the biggest names to have been moved in August. But as MLB.com's Mark Feinsand wrote Tuesday, trade season is far from over.

And though they are still in the thick of the National League postseason race, the Giants could be an interesting team to watch. San Francisco entered Tuesday with a 60-60 record, putting it five games out in the NL West and 6 1/2 behind in the NL Wild Card chase. However, the Giants will need to leapfrog three other teams to win the division and six teams to grab the second NL Wild Card spot.

Giants outfielder Andrew McCutchen and left-hander Derek Holland each made Feinsand's list of 10 August trade candidates. Both players are set to become free agents this offseason.

Feinsand notes that the Blue Jays could be active on the trade market before Aug. 31 as well, with third baseman Josh Donaldson, outfielder Curtis Granderson and right-hander Marco Estrada among Toronto's most likely candidates to be dealt.

Reds right-hander Matt Harvey, White Sox right-hander James Shields, Twins right-hander Ervin Santana, Rays right-hander Sergio Romo and Tigers shortstop Jose Iglesias also made Feinsand's list. More >

Granderson reportedly clears revocable waivers
Aug. 14: Blue Jays outfielder Curtis Granderson, who was one of the 10 August trade candidates MLB.com's Mark Feinsand broke down Tuesday, has cleared revocable waivers and is free to be dealt anywhere, reports Robert Murray of The Athletic. 

Tweet from @ByRobertMurray: #BlueJays' Curtis Granderson has cleared revocable trade waivers, source tells The Athletic. He's free to be traded anywhere.

Granderson, who can become a free agent this offseason, owns a solid .766 OPS against right-handers in 2018. He also has extensive postseason experience, having played in the playoffs in seven seasons.

Granderson, 37, was part of an August trade just last season, going from the Mets to the Dodgers after passing through waivers unclaimed earlier in the month. More >

Bruce could be odd man out of Mets' outfield
Aug. 14: Jay Bruce is a name to monitor this month as the Mets could look to deal from their outfield surplus. Trading Bruce would open up time at the corners for Michael Conforto and Brandon Nimmo.

Bruce is nearing a return from a right hip injury that's sidelined him since June 17. Joel Sherman of the New York Post suggested Monday that Bruce could be dealt if he show's he's healthy before the end of the month, pointing to the Giants, Mariners, Rockies, Indians and Tigers as potential trade partners for the Mets.

Bruce has a five-team no-trade clause of the Orioles, Mariners, Rays, Blue Jays and A's, per Sherman, and two years, $28 million remaining on his contract after this season. He's batting .212/.292/.613 with three homers and 17 RBIs through 62 games this season.

Will Dodgers look to trade market to bolster injury-plagued bullpen?
Aug. 14: The Dodgers are down another reliever, with John Axford set to join Kenley Jansen, Tony Cingrani, Josh Fields, Yimi Garcia and Daniel Hudson on the disabled list after suffering a fractured tibia when he was hit by a comebacker Sunday.

While Los Angeles recently moved starters Kenta Maeda and Ross Stripling to the bullpen to help out its beleaguered relief corps, it's possible the club will look to swing an August trade for some bullpen help.

The problem? There might not be many attractive options available.

Sergio Romo, Jim Johnson and Tyler Clippard pitch for AL teams, meaning the Dodgers will be one of the last clubs that has a chance to claim them, based on the waiver-priority rules. Those hurlers might not even make it out of the AL before being claimed, as was the case with Fernando Rodney, who was traded to the A's last Thursday after being snagged off waivers from the Twins.

As for NL relievers, pitchers such as Bud Norris, Kirby Yates, Craig Stammen, Jared Hughes and David Hernandez also have a good chance of being claimed before the Dodgers have the opportunity to grab them.

Tigers southpaw Francisco Liriano reportedly cleared waivers already, but he's unlikely to draw interest as anything more than a lefty specialist. Liriano has held same-sided hitters to a .567 OPS since the outset of 2017, but right-handed batters have posted an .849 mark against him in that time.

Video: LAD@COL: Friedman provides update on Jansen

Marlins remain open to trading more veterans
Aug. 13: While the Marlins have traded Dee Gordon, Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, Christian Yelich, Cameron Maybin, Brad Ziegler and Justin Bour in less than nine months, they might not be done dealing.

According to the Miami Herald's Barry Jackson, the Marlins remain open to moving some veterans before Aug. 31, with infielder/outfielder Derek Dietrich, second baseman Starlin Castro and right-hander Dan Straily among the most likely candidates to be dealt.

Dietrich could draw more suitors than the other two, as he has considerable experience at three positions (2B, 3B, LF), owns a 116 OPS+ over the past four seasons and is controllable through 2020. Per Jackson, the Cubs and Indians inquired about the 29-year-old during July.

Meanwhile, Jackson writes that "no team expressed serious interest" in Castro, who is owed nearly $12 million in '19 and has a team option for $16 million with a $1 million buyout for '20, before the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline. And though the A's discussed a Straily trade with the Marlins last month, Oakland has since acquired Mike Fiers from the Tigers.

The 29-year-old Straily has two more seasons of arbitration eligibility remaining after this one before he can become a free agent, which helps his trade value. But teams may be hesitant to give up notable prospects for a pitcher who has recorded a lifetime 4.27 ERA with a 4.81 FIP (4.42 ERA, 5.40 FIP in '18).

Rays option Faria to Triple-A, activate Pham

MLB.com

NEW YORK -- Tampa Bay had to make room on its 25-man roster for outfielder Tommy Pham to return from the disabled list, and Jake Faria became the guy to go. Pham returns after missing two weeks with a right foot fracture.

The Rays optioned the right-hander to Triple-A Durham, a move that Rays manager Kevin Cash explained before Thursday's finale vs. the Yankees.

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NEW YORK -- Tampa Bay had to make room on its 25-man roster for outfielder Tommy Pham to return from the disabled list, and Jake Faria became the guy to go. Pham returns after missing two weeks with a right foot fracture.

The Rays optioned the right-hander to Triple-A Durham, a move that Rays manager Kevin Cash explained before Thursday's finale vs. the Yankees.

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"Obviously, it was a tough decision," Cash said. "Talking to Jake last night, it's been a tough year, a trying year for him. It's not a lost year. And there's things that he can go down there and continue to work on. 

"I think he's made progress his last two outings. But the way we are built right now, we have six guys that we're looking to provide bulk innings to in some capacity, some form or fashion, and I don't thinking trying to do that with six guys is fair to all of them. We had to pick someone."

Cash noted that it will be good to get Faria "in an environment where he can get some work."

"We talked to him about valuing his work days, his side days, and if we have to shave an inning off a game day, we'll do that, because we want him to get after it in his bullpen and side sessions," Cash said.

Cash noted that he told Faria that for two months of the 2017 season he "wasn't just the best pitcher on the team, he could have arguably been the best pitcher in the American League.

"The best starting pitcher, the way he came up and came onto the scene," Cash said. "We have to do everything we can to get him back to that. We're confident this approach will help."

Faria, who's 4-3 with a 4.84 ERA in 13 appearances (11 starts), will start in Durham.

"When he comes back, I envision that he will have bulk innings to work with, whether he will be starting or not [remains to be seen]," Cash said.

Worth noting

• The Rays have received cash considerations from the Phillies to complete the Wilson Ramos trade.

Mallex Smith and Matt Duffy each entered Thursday's action hitting .297, which means one or both could become the first qualifying Rays player to hit .300 or better in a season since Casey Kotchman (.306) did so in 2011.

Ryan Yarbrough recorded his 11th win Wednesday night against the Yankees, giving him the most victories in the Major Leagues among rookie pitchers. Rolando Arrojo owns the Rays record for rookie wins with 14 in 1998.

Bill Chastain is a reporter for MLB.com based in St. Petersburg.

Tampa Bay Rays, Jake Faria

Ohtani ramps up intensity in bullpen session

Rivera activated from disabled list; Briceno optioned
MLB.com

SAN DIEGO -- Shohei Ohtani continues to ramp up the intensity of his bullpen sessions as he progresses deeper into his rehab from his right elbow injury.

Ohtani threw a 33-pitch bullpen session in Anaheim on Wednesday with batters in the box. Manager Mike Scioscia said the batters stood in for "perspective" and did not swing. Ohtani threw 15 pitches and rested for five minutes before throwing his final 18 pitches to simulate a break between innings.

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SAN DIEGO -- Shohei Ohtani continues to ramp up the intensity of his bullpen sessions as he progresses deeper into his rehab from his right elbow injury.

Ohtani threw a 33-pitch bullpen session in Anaheim on Wednesday with batters in the box. Manager Mike Scioscia said the batters stood in for "perspective" and did not swing. Ohtani threw 15 pitches and rested for five minutes before throwing his final 18 pitches to simulate a break between innings.

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The Angels wanted Ohtani to complete his throwing session at Angel Stadium for data-gathering purposes, though he returned to San Diego in time for Wednesday's game against the Padres.

Ohtani said his third session off the mound was at "close to 100 percent" in terms of effort level. He mixed in all his pitches, including his fastball, splitter, curveball and slider.

"He aired it out," Scioscia said. "His intensity level was great, so we'll continue to hopefully make progress and see where we go."

Ohtani has not pitched for the Angels since June 6 because of a Grade 2 sprain of the ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow, but the club is optimistic that he'll be able to return to the mound before the end of the season.

Video: LAA@SD: Rivera lifts towering go-ahead homer in 9th

Rivera makes long-awaited return

Rene Rivera's first career stint on the disabled list has finally come to an end, as the Angels activated the 35-year-old veteran catcher on Wednesday and started him behind the plate for their series finale against the Padres at Petco Park.

To clear a roster spot for Rivera, the Angels optioned rookie Jose Briceno to Triple-A Salt Lake. Right-hander Akeel Morris was designated for assignment to create a vacancy on the 40-man roster.

In Wednesday night's 3-2 win over the Padres, Rivera went 2-for-4 with a single and a go-ahead home run in the ninth inning.

Rivera hasn't played for the Angels since May 16, missing 76 games after undergoing surgery to repair a torn meniscus in his right knee. Rivera was originally signed to back up Martin Maldonado, but he will likely be eased into a starting role now that Maldonado is with the Astros.

Known for his strong defense, Rivera batted .259 with an .804 OPS, three home runs and 10 RBIs in 22 games for the Angels before hurting his knee.

"When we started the season, obviously, we looked for Rene to carry a certain workload and bring that presence behind the plate," Scioscia said. "He played well before he got hurt. I think that his experience will help him, not only with the game plans, but the adjustments in between innings. He does a really good job with the pitchers. Not that the other guys weren't. I think the other guys were doing a terrific job. I think Rene will be a settling effect for these guys, for sure."

Briceno's demotion leaves rookie Francisco Arcia as the Angels' second catcher. Arcia, 28, spent 12 years toiling in the Minors before receiving his first MLB callup on July 26. He's made the most of his opportunity since then, batting .324 with a .990 OPS, three home runs and 13 RBIs in 12 games with the Angels. A left-handed bat, Arcia is also a better complement to the right-handed-hitting Rivera.

Briceno, 25, batted .291 with a .764 OPS, three home runs and eight RBIs in 30 games with the Angels this season. He will likely return to the Majors once rosters expand on Sept. 1.

"Jose definitely needs to work on a couple things on the offensive and defensive end," Scioscia said. "This will give him a chance to do that. It's tough to continue to work on some things at the Major League level. Frankie's playing at a really high level. He's a left-handed bat, so there's a lot of things on both sides of the ledger."

Despaigne update

The Angels optioned newly acquired right-hander Odrisamer Despaigne to Triple-A Salt Lake on Wednesday, but he will likely join the club soon. Scioscia said Despaigne will likely start one of the Angels' games in Texas this week, helping to fill the void left by the injuries to Nick Tropeano and Tyler Skaggs.

The Angels plan to have a bullpen game on Thursday, so Friday seems like the likeliest day for Despaigne to pitch. Left-hander Andrew Heaney and right-hander Jaime Barria are listed as the probable pitchers for Saturday and Sunday.

Maria Guardado covers the Angels for MLB.com. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Los Angeles Angels, Rene Rivera

Ramos 'learned from the best' as young catcher

Phillies' backstop reflects on Pudge's tutelage
MLB.com

PHILADELPHIA -- Shortly after Wilson Ramos began the next chapter of his baseball career in an emphatic way, the Phillies' new catcher spoke fondly of the past.

Ramos couldn't help but reflect on the similarities between his three-hit, three-RBI Phillies debut and another memorable night in his career -- his Major League debut. Ramos collected four hits in his first MLB game back in May 2010, which marked the highlight of his initial, but brief, tenure with the Minnesota Twins. Ramos was traded to the Nationals later that summer, where he met a childhood hero whom he credits with shaping his career more than anyone else: Hall of Fame backstop Ivan Rodriguez.

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PHILADELPHIA -- Shortly after Wilson Ramos began the next chapter of his baseball career in an emphatic way, the Phillies' new catcher spoke fondly of the past.

Ramos couldn't help but reflect on the similarities between his three-hit, three-RBI Phillies debut and another memorable night in his career -- his Major League debut. Ramos collected four hits in his first MLB game back in May 2010, which marked the highlight of his initial, but brief, tenure with the Minnesota Twins. Ramos was traded to the Nationals later that summer, where he met a childhood hero whom he credits with shaping his career more than anyone else: Hall of Fame backstop Ivan Rodriguez.

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"I always say it, I learned from the best catcher in history," Ramos said after he led the Phillies to a 7-4 win over the Red Sox. "I always keep that in mind. I think that's the reason I'm doing a good job in the big leagues."

Video: BOS@PHI: Ramos rips a 2-run double to right-center

As a young catcher growing up in Venezuela, Ramos said Rodriguez was his favorite player. He called the chance to learn from Rodriguez, whose everyday job he assumed later that season, "a dream come true."

"He showed me a lot behind the plate, how to call the game," Ramos said. "That's the experience I want to give to all these young pitchers [on the Phillies]."

It's that type of veteran presence the Phillies hope can benefit their talented, but inexperienced, core, and any defensive value Ramos provides -- like the impressive throw from his knees Ramos displayed to catch Brock Holt stealing Wednesday -- will be considered a plus. More than anything, the Phillies acquired Ramos from the Rays at the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline with the hope that he'll continue to jolt an offense that lagged in recent weeks.

Video: BOS@PHI: Ramos nabs Holt at second in Phillies debut

Over the last two seasons, among all catchers with at least 200 games behind the plate, Ramos ranks first in slugging, and second in average and OPS. He was arguably the most productive offensive catcher in baseball during the first half, leading all qualified backstops in hitting (.297), slugging (.488), home runs (14) and weighted on-base average (.358).

In 78 games total for the Rays, Ramos hit .297/.346/.488 with 14 home runs and 53 RBIs.

"Ramos has a proven track record of success on both sides of the ball, but specifically at the plate, he's been a real plus-offensive performer," Phillies manager Gabe Kapler said. "So yeah, we can see him providing a significant boost to our lineup. … Our lineup is just a whole lot deeper."

Video: BOS@PHI: Ramos triples to lead off bottom of the 6th

Though confident Ramos' hamstring is fully healed, Kapler said he plans to ease Ramos into game action, hoping to find two days off per week for the 31-year-old.

"We're going to go slow about how we roll Ramos out," Kapler said. "See how his body responds."

Other factors are the Phillies' upcoming schedule -- they have a doubleheader Thursday against the Mets -- and Jorge Alfaro, who has emerged as one of baseball's top defensive catchers. The rookie, though, has struggled to keep his offensive production (82 OPS+) near league-average.

Video: MIA@PHI: Alfaro's 89.5-mph throw nabs Rojas stealing

"To say he's losing his job is a pretty significant stretch," Kapler said of Alfaro. "He's got a lot to offer and is going to play as well. He's still a developing young core piece of our roster. ... We'll encourage him to pick the brain of Ramos constantly and continue to learn and develop."

Kapler said Andrew Knapp -- who was optioned to make room for Ramos -- will get reps all over the diamond at Triple-A, including at first base, third base and left field. Outside of a handful of starts at first, Knapp has been exclusively a catcher during his five-year professional career.

"We want to give him the opportunity to be as versatile as possible, be a bat off the bench and provide us a lot of flexibility on a playoff roster," Kapler said. "He's adored by our staff and our players, and he's got some extraordinary leadership characteristics."

Eflin returns, briefly
Four days after he was optioned to clear space for Justin Bour on the active roster, Zach Eflin was back in the Phillies clubhouse prepping to start the second game of Thursday's doubleheader against the Mets. Under normal circumstances, Eflin wouldn't be eligible to return until Tuesday. But because of the doubleheader and two off-days on the Phillies' schedule, he can be activated as the 26th man for Thursday and then complete his 10-day option without missing any starts.

Kapler met with Eflin for breakfast in Philadelphia recently to explain the temporary demotion, which wasn't based on performance and will ultimately cost the 24-year-old nine days of service time and big league pay. The right-hander owns a 3.20 ERA since June 1 and is 8-4 with a 3.57 ERA in 16 starts overall.

"At the end of the day, we all understand the move, but this wasn't too easy to swallow. All you can do is be positive and move forward and use it as motivation," Eflin said. "It's easy to focus on losing service time or losing money, but the only thing I've been worried about the whole time is being away from my teammates. Losing those days of relationships in the middle of a pennant race, that's what affected me the most. I could care less about the money I missed."

The Phillies won't need to make a corresponding roster move to activate Eflin or return him to the Minors, but they will need to make one to recall rookie Ranger Suarez, who will start Game 1 of Thursday's doubleheader. The assignment will mark the second big league start for Suarez, the club's No. 8 prospect per MLB Pipeline.

Joe Trezza is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @joetrezz.

Philadelphia Phillies, Zach Eflin, Wilson Ramos, Ranger Suarez

Marlins promote hot-hitting Dean from Minors

Bostick optioned to Triple-A New Orleans in corresponding move
MLB.com

ATLANTA -- The message Marlins chief executive officer Derek Jeter gave to all Minor Leaguers in Spring Training was that everyone would be starting off with a clean slate. All players, regardless of which round they were drafted in, would get a chance to prove themselves, and those who performed would be rewarded.

Clearly, Austin Dean took that message to heart. The 24-year-old outfielder posted eye-opening numbers at Double-A Jacksonville and Triple-A New Orleans this season, and the Marlins selected his contract on Wednesday.

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ATLANTA -- The message Marlins chief executive officer Derek Jeter gave to all Minor Leaguers in Spring Training was that everyone would be starting off with a clean slate. All players, regardless of which round they were drafted in, would get a chance to prove themselves, and those who performed would be rewarded.

Clearly, Austin Dean took that message to heart. The 24-year-old outfielder posted eye-opening numbers at Double-A Jacksonville and Triple-A New Orleans this season, and the Marlins selected his contract on Wednesday.

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"Derek talked about it in the spring, 'If you perform, you're going to have a chance to get here,'" Marlins manager Don Mattingly said. "That's really what he's done. I'm looking forward to seeing him get an opportunity and seeing him play. A lot of people think he has a chance to hit here."

The Marlins optioned utility player Christopher Bostick to Triple-A to open a roster spot for Dean.

"I think the organization itself is doing a good job of promoting the young guys who are doing well that deserve to show that they can play competitive baseball," Dean said.

Tweet from @Marlins: The crack of the bat always seems louder for your big league debut. Right, Austin? 🎤������ pic.twitter.com/y2PoNM1r4Q

Dean played 649 games in the Minor Leagues before making his Major League debut, which came Wednesday as he started in left field in the series finale against the Braves at SunTrust Park. He went 0-for-3 batting sixth in the lineup in the 5-2 loss.

Dean, ranked by MLB Pipeline as the Marlins' No. 28 prospect, is expected to get a chance to play either right or left field.

Dean put up strong numbers all season, hitting a combined .345/.410/.511 with 12 home runs, 68 RBIs and a .922 OPS between Jacksonville and New Orleans.

"He's had a tremendous season," Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill said. "Like I've said, it's always nice when players put themselves on the radar. With Austin this year, he's definitely opened a lot of eyes."

A fourth-round Draft pick in 2012, Dean opened the season at Jacksonville, where he batted .420 with three homers and 14 RBIs in 22 games. He was promoted to New Orleans on April 29, where he hit .326 with nine home runs and 54 RBIs in 87 games.

"When I got called up to Triple-A, it was my second time getting promoted during the season," Dean said. "It was good to get that, knowing that my hard work has paid off. Obviously, getting promoted here has been the biggest accomplishment."

Video: Callis breaks down MLB Pipeline's Team of the Week

Dean's arrival means rookie Brian Anderson, who has played mostly right field, will move back to third base. The Marlins plan on using Anderson both in right field and third base the rest of the season. Dean's best position is left field.

The Marlins created a 40-man roster space for Dean on Tuesday night after their 10-6 loss to the Braves, when they traded right-hander Odrisamer Despaigne to the Angels for cash considerations.

Dean had been a candidate for a September callup, but with the injuries to Miguel Rojas (left ankle contusion) and Martin Prado (on the disabled list with a left quad strain), the Marlins decided to make the roster move now. At some point before November, Miami would have had to make a decision to put Dean on their 40-man roster or risk losing him in the Rule 5 Draft.

"Obviously, we've been following him throughout his career in our system, and he's taken a big step forward this year," Hill said. "He mastered Double-A and we got him to Triple-A. We wanted to see how he would respond to the challenge of Triple-A. He's continued the same quality at-bats. Suffice to say, given our injury situation, we've definitely talked about him and how he might possibly fit."

Video: MIA@ATL: Dean's girlfriend on Austin making MLB debut

Worth noting
• The Marlins are optimistic Rojas will avoid a DL stint. Rojas jammed his ankle in Game 2 of Monday's split doubleheader. He said the ankle is feeling better, and with a scheduled off-day on Thursday, Rojas may be ready to return to the lineup on Friday at Washington. If he has a setback, the DL may be an option, and the club would then have to call up an infielder.

Kyle Barraclough (lower back tightness) threw 20 pitches in a simulated game on Wednesday afternoon. The right-hander physically feels fine, but he is still polishing up his command facing batters. Barraclough will travel with the club to Washington, and he may face hitters again as early as Saturday.

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins

Torreyes grateful to be back with Yanks

Infielder starts at second base to give slumping Torres a rest
MLB.com

NEW YORK -- The last two months have been an emotional roller coaster for Ronald Torreyes. But after making it through a stint in the Minors and helping his wife through a health issue at home, the Yankees infielder is excited to be back in pinstripes.

Torreyes was optioned to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on June 18, and he played five games there before being placed on the temporarily inactive list so he could be home with his wife, who was experiencing an undisclosed health problem. Although Torreyes did not say what his wife was dealing with, he did say that she is much better now.

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NEW YORK -- The last two months have been an emotional roller coaster for Ronald Torreyes. But after making it through a stint in the Minors and helping his wife through a health issue at home, the Yankees infielder is excited to be back in pinstripes.

Torreyes was optioned to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on June 18, and he played five games there before being placed on the temporarily inactive list so he could be home with his wife, who was experiencing an undisclosed health problem. Although Torreyes did not say what his wife was dealing with, he did say that she is much better now.

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"The most I want to say about that is thank God that everything's fine, she's fine," Torreyes said. "I'm happy that things worked out very well. Just happy that nothing bad happened to her, because she's been there for me throughout my career. Just happy that she's fine."

Torreyes was then assigned to Class A Advanced Tampa a month later for a brief stint before returning to the RailRiders on July 30. He has hit .252 with nine RBIs in 30 Minor League games this season and had a .323 batting average with six RBIs in his first 24 games with the Yankees.

"I just want to keep doing what I've been doing for this team," Torreyes said. "Being there for the team in any way possible, being there for my teammates, bringing a little bit of energy and joy to the clubhouse and team, but that's it. That's something that I've been doing since I got here ... and I just want to be able to continue to do that."

When Torreyes was sent down to Triple-A, Yankees fans were disappointed in losing one of their favorite players for an unknown amount of time. Torreyes said those fans continued to show their support for him over the last few months.

"Fans have a loud voice, so when I was down there, I received a lot of messages from a lot of fans of encouraging words saying, 'Keep doing your thing, you'll be back,'" Torreyes said. "And now that I'm up here, the messages are still coming. They are saying, 'Hey, you're finally back.' It serves as motivation to see that somehow you matter to so many different people, some people that you don't even know."

Torreyes made his first big league start in just over two months on Wednesday to spell a slumping Gleyber Torres, who has hit .145 in 19 games since returning from the disabled list on July 25.

"I just wanted to give [Torres] a day," Yankees manager Aaron Boone said. "I feel like he's just pressing a little bit up there, chasing that hit if you will. I don't feel like he's far off. I feel like physically he's in a pretty good place. Just felt like he's been grinding pretty hard at the plate right now, so just a day to kind of catch his breath and hopefully find that good timing that I know is right around the corner for him. And it's a day to get Toe in there and get him involved."

Roster move
To make room for Luis Cessa on the 25-man roster for Wednesday's start against the Rays, the Yankees designated right-hander George Kontos for assignment.

Kontos was acquired in a trade with the Indians on Aug. 4, and the Yankees selected his contract from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on Monday. Kontos made just one appearance in pinstripes, tossing 1 2/3 scoreless innings in Monday's 8-5 loss to the Mets.

This date in Yankees history
Aug. 15, 1955: Mickey Mantle homered from both sides of the plate for the second time in his career in a 12-6 victory at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium in Game 2 of a doubleheader sweep of the Orioles.

Mandy Bell is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York.

New York Yankees, Ronald Torreyes

Pannone optioned to Triple-A, Mayza recalled

Special to MLB.com

KANSAS CITY -- In an effort to get left-hander Thomas Pannone ready for possible duty as a starter, the Blue Jays optioned Pannone to Triple-A Buffalo on Wednesday and recalled well-traveled left-hander Tim Mayza.

Pannone left the Jays on a high note. Summoned from the bullpen to face lefty-hitting Alex Gordon in the seventh inning Tuesday, Pannone recorded a strikeout. The Jays trailed the Royals 5-4 at that point, but rallied for a 6-5 win.

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KANSAS CITY -- In an effort to get left-hander Thomas Pannone ready for possible duty as a starter, the Blue Jays optioned Pannone to Triple-A Buffalo on Wednesday and recalled well-traveled left-hander Tim Mayza.

Pannone left the Jays on a high note. Summoned from the bullpen to face lefty-hitting Alex Gordon in the seventh inning Tuesday, Pannone recorded a strikeout. The Jays trailed the Royals 5-4 at that point, but rallied for a 6-5 win.

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"We just wanted [Pannone] to go back down and start again," Toronto manager John Gibbons said. "Build him up a little bit. He may get a couple of starts in September."

Mayza has been in a shuttle pattern this year between Buffalo and Toronto. The latest callup marked the seventh time this year he has joined the Blue Jays.

Robert Falkoff is a contributor to MLB.com based in Kansas City.

Toronto Blue Jays

Royals bid adieu to Gore with trade to Cubs

MLB.com

KANSAS CITY -- Terrance Gore will be forever remembered in Royals' lore as the team's designated pinch-runner, mostly in September and during the team's playoff runs in 2014 and '15.

The speedy Gore, though, ran out of options after 2017 and the team designated him for assignment last fall, before signing him back to a Minor League deal. Gore never made it back to the 40-man roster this season and was traded on Wednesday to the Cubs for cash considerations.

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KANSAS CITY -- Terrance Gore will be forever remembered in Royals' lore as the team's designated pinch-runner, mostly in September and during the team's playoff runs in 2014 and '15.

The speedy Gore, though, ran out of options after 2017 and the team designated him for assignment last fall, before signing him back to a Minor League deal. Gore never made it back to the 40-man roster this season and was traded on Wednesday to the Cubs for cash considerations.

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Gore certainly made an impact on the Royals' fan base. He never got a hit in 14 big league plate appearances, but he stole 21 bases in 25 attempts and created a thrill every time he came in late in games to pinch-run.

Video: AL WC: Gore steals second base in the 8th inning

Gore also stole four bases in five attempts during the team's 2014 and '15 postseason runs.

"He was great," Royals manager Ned Yost said. "He was a big weapon, as bona fide as a big pinch-hitter. You get in the eighth or ninth inning and to have him and [Jarrod] Dyson on the bench, it pretty much assured you that you would get someone in scoring position.

"He was a big part of our team back then. It was a nice luxury to have, someone like [Gore] who could steal tough bases."

Another speedster, Royals shortstop Adalberto Mondesi, enjoyed his time with Gore.

"He was a great guy," Mondesi said. "I really liked playing with him."

Who is faster, Mondesi or Gore?

"They talked about that a lot at Triple-A," Mondesi said. "I think he was faster. Maybe I was when it came to baserunning, first to third. But in a straight line, he was the fastest."

Boyer released

To make room on the 25-man roster for right-hander Jorge Lopez, the Royals put right-hander Blaine Boyer on unconditional release waivers Wednesday.

Boyer impressed Royals coaches with a strong Spring Training, but he struggled throughout the regular season and posted a 12.05 ERA in 21 outings, the last of which came Tuesday when he squandered a 5-4 lead in the eighth inning against Toronto by giving up a two-run homer in a 6-5 loss.

"It was a battle for him all year long," Yost said. "Then he had the [back inflammation]. But he always worked hard. Was a great teammate.

"But on the mound, he could never get on a roll. Never got it going. Just a struggle."

Jeffrey Flanagan has covered the Royals since 1991, and for MLB.com since 2015. Follow him on Twitter @FlannyMLB.

Kansas City Royals, Terrance Gore

Paxton goes on DL with left forearm bruise

Gordon moving back to center field with Cano at second base
MLB.com

OAKLAND -- Mariners left-hander James Paxton was placed on the 10-day disabled list on Wednesday after being knocked out of Tuesday's start in the first inning with a bruised left forearm, courtesy of a line drive off the bat of the A's Jed Lowrie.

Seattle recalled right-hander Christian Bergman from Triple-A Tacoma to take Paxton's roster spot. Bergman provides a long-relief option, with Felix Hernandez having pitched 5 2/3 innings in place of Paxton in his first career relief appearance in Tuesday night's loss to the A's.

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OAKLAND -- Mariners left-hander James Paxton was placed on the 10-day disabled list on Wednesday after being knocked out of Tuesday's start in the first inning with a bruised left forearm, courtesy of a line drive off the bat of the A's Jed Lowrie.

Seattle recalled right-hander Christian Bergman from Triple-A Tacoma to take Paxton's roster spot. Bergman provides a long-relief option, with Felix Hernandez having pitched 5 2/3 innings in place of Paxton in his first career relief appearance in Tuesday night's loss to the A's.

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Hernandez likely will take Paxton's spot in the rotation for now, with his next start due Monday against the Astros in Seattle.

"Right now, he would be our best option," manager Scott Servais said prior to Wednesday's 2-0 win over the A's in 12 innings.

Servais is optimistic that Paxton won't be out much longer than the 10-day period, which could mean missing just one or two starts. Paxton said he had some trouble sleeping Tuesday night with the throbbing arm, but he was glad to see the swelling had gone down some by Wednesday morning.

"It's actually better today," Paxton said. "Last night, I couldn't really use my wrist or fingers much, but today, I'm moving it a little better. That's got to be a good sign. There's still some swelling in there, so it's just going to be about getting that out and going from there."

Video: SEA@OAK: Paxton exits after being hit with comebacker

Servais said the key will be to see how Paxton feels in a few days and how soon he can begin throwing again.

"We have to wait and see how it'll be when he can get a ball in his hand," Servais said. "Right now, we're on hold."

Bergman joined the Mariners on Wednesday, and he was available for the series finale. The 30-year-old is making his second stint with Seattle this season, having made two spot starts and going 0-1 with a 3.97 ERA in 11 1/3 innings.

Gordon getting time in center field

The return of Robinson Cano means several players will need to be flexible over the final seven weeks of the regular season in order to fit him back into the lineup. Cano started at first base on Tuesday in place of Ryon Healy, but he was at second base and went 2-for-5 in Wednesday's game.

That pushed Dee Gordon back out to center field, where he started 39 games before returning to second base when Cano drew his 80-game suspension in mid-May. He made a leaping catch in the fifth inning and cracked the go-ahead homer in the 12th to send Seattle to victory.

Video: SEA@OAK: Gordon belts a go-ahead 2-run HR in the 12th

Gordon says he's open to doing whatever the team needs.

"That's huge," Servais said. "That's the attitude we need to take on right now. Everybody needs to be open to sliding around to do what's best for the whole ballclub to get everybody in there and keep everybody going.

"Dee hasn't been out there in quite some time, but he has been out there in [batting practice] and stuff. He knew this was coming a little bit. He'll be out there one day, then probably back in the infield the next day. That's just the way we're going to roll with it."

Video: SEA@OAK: Gordon snags fly ball on warning track in CF

The Mariners acquired Gordon to play center field this season, but he's been excellent since returning to his natural second-base position, so he will likely continue getting most of his time there.

"This guy is an exceptional athlete," said Servais. "We're fortunate we've got him and he can do those things and is willing to do it."

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners, Dee Gordon, James Paxton

Orioles release Valencia from contract

MLB.com

BALTIMORE -- Five days after designating him for assignment, the Orioles have released Danny Valencia from his contract. The infielder is now a free agent and can sign with any team.

Valencia, a nine-year veteran in his second stint with Baltimore, was one of the most consistent contributors in the lineup once he took over as the everyday third baseman after Tim Beckham went on the disabled list with a left groin strain on April 25. Valencia owned a .292 batting average on June 27, but that began to drop off by the time he lost playing time and consistent at-bats with the return of Beckham and the O's acquisition of infielder Jonathan Villar

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BALTIMORE -- Five days after designating him for assignment, the Orioles have released Danny Valencia from his contract. The infielder is now a free agent and can sign with any team.

Valencia, a nine-year veteran in his second stint with Baltimore, was one of the most consistent contributors in the lineup once he took over as the everyday third baseman after Tim Beckham went on the disabled list with a left groin strain on April 25. Valencia owned a .292 batting average on June 27, but that began to drop off by the time he lost playing time and consistent at-bats with the return of Beckham and the O's acquisition of infielder Jonathan Villar

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The Orioles could not find a suitable trade partner for Valencia, but the utility infielder may be an attractive signing as a bench piece for a contender, as he owns a .303 batting average against lefties in 2018 and .312 for his career.

"I'd be surprised if they don't [pick him up]," Orioles manager Buck Showalter said. "There will be some interest now that that's kind of flushed out. I'll be surprised if Danny isn't playing again shortly for somebody."

Zachary Silver is a reporter for MLB.com based in Baltimore. Follow him on Twitter at @zachsilver.

Baltimore Orioles, Danny Valencia

Cubs acquire Terrance Gore from Royals

MLB.com

CHICAGO -- The Cubs acquired speedster Terrance Gore from the Royals for cash considerations on Wednesday.

The 27-year-old has yet to appear in the Majors this season, but in 49 career games, Gore has swiped 21 bases. Known for his speed, Gore is also seeking his first career big league hit as he's gone 0-for-11.

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CHICAGO -- The Cubs acquired speedster Terrance Gore from the Royals for cash considerations on Wednesday.

The 27-year-old has yet to appear in the Majors this season, but in 49 career games, Gore has swiped 21 bases. Known for his speed, Gore is also seeking his first career big league hit as he's gone 0-for-11.

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In 67 games at Triple-A Omaha this season, Gore is hitting .211/.304/.254 with 16 stolen bases.

Gore, 27, would give the Cubs some speed, which he provided in the postseason for the Royals in 2014 and '15. By being in the Cubs' organization before Aug. 31, he is eligible for the postseason roster.

Carrie Muskat has covered the Cubs since 1987, and for MLB.com since 2001. You can follow her on Twitter @CarrieMuskat.

Chicago Cubs, Terrance Gore

Angels acquire RHP Despaigne from Marlins

MLB.com

SAN DIEGO -- Starved for pitching depth, the Angels acquired right-hander Odrisamer Despaigne from the Marlins on Tuesday night in exchange for cash considerations. Right-hander Dayan Diaz was designated for assignment to clear a spot for Despaigne on the 40-man roster.

Manager Mike Scioscia said Despaigne will be used as a starter and help fill the holes in the rotation that were created by the injuries to Nick Tropeano and Tyler Skaggs. Despaigne is expected to join the Angels in the next couple days and is an option to start Thursday or Friday at Texas.

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SAN DIEGO -- Starved for pitching depth, the Angels acquired right-hander Odrisamer Despaigne from the Marlins on Tuesday night in exchange for cash considerations. Right-hander Dayan Diaz was designated for assignment to clear a spot for Despaigne on the 40-man roster.

Manager Mike Scioscia said Despaigne will be used as a starter and help fill the holes in the rotation that were created by the injuries to Nick Tropeano and Tyler Skaggs. Despaigne is expected to join the Angels in the next couple days and is an option to start Thursday or Friday at Texas.

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"He's definitely going to help us in our rotation," Scioscia said. "We're trying to patchwork a lot of stuff and adapt to what we have to do on the pitching side. He'll help us do that."

Despaigne, 31, logged a 5.31 ERA over 20 1/3 innings in 11 appearances for the Marlins this season. He opened the season in Miami's rotation but made only one start before being moved to the bullpen. Despaigne spent a month on the disabled list with a right forearm strain earlier this season and has not pitched in the Majors since May 31.

Despaigne was optioned to Triple-A New Orleans on June 7 and posted a 4.36 ERA with 40 strikeouts over 43 1/3 innings in 13 games, including four starts. A native of La Habana, Cuba, Despaigne played for the Havana Industriales of the Serie Nacional for eight seasons before defecting and signing a Minor League deal with the Padres on May 2, 2014. He has a 4.76 ERA in 98 career Major League games with the Padres, Orioles and Marlins.

Maria Guardado covers the Angels for MLB.com. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Los Angeles Angels, Odrisamer Despaigne