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The Cubs complete 7-game sweep of Mets, their first such sweep of that many games since 1885

Let's start by listing a few things that happened in the year 1885, and labeling them based on importance.

- Grover Cleveland succeeded Chester A. Arthur to become the 22nd President of the United States.

Rank: Very important.

- The first appendectomy was performed by Dr. William W. Grant, a medical marvel at the time that's saved countless lives since.

Rank: Unbelievably important.

- Over the course of their 87-25 pennant winning season, the Chicago White Stockings defeated the Buffalo Bisons 15 times without losing. Sweeping the season series against the Bisons, who were dreadful and left the league after the season.

Rank: Probably not that important.

Until Thursday.

Without this context, Chicago's 6-1 win over the Mets at Citi Field might have just felt like another July 2 game. Another disappointing offensive performance from the Mets. Another strong Jake Arrieta start.

But the win ensured the Cubs swept the season series from the Mets, winning all seven games against New York. According to the Cubs, the franchise hasn't swept a season series of at least that many games against an opponent since that faithful 1885 season.

That's 130 years … and two World Series' ago. This is what baseball looked like:


Obviously a stat this wacky represents an anomaly. In this case, it is contingent on scheduling. Since division rivals play each other 19 times per season these days, any season sweep has to occur against non-divisional or interleague opponents. And this season, the Mets and Cubs just happened to play a four-game set and a three-game set, instead of a more common three-three split. That's what happened when Chicago swept the season series from Atlanta in 2008. The Cubs went 6-0 against the Braves that year, opening the door for Thursday's mundane game to represent historical craziness. Overall, the Mets have dropped nine straight games to the Cubs, which isn't relevant historically but may provide New York with some uneasy intestinal pains.

Long live the appendectomy!