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10 players you forgot played for the Dodgers

MLB.com @kengurnick

LOS ANGELES -- Remember the best Dodgers moments of future Hall of Famers Jim Bunning, Gary Carter, Juan Marichal, Frank Robinson or Hoyt Wilhelm?

Probably not, but they all wore Dodger Blue. And they weren't alone as far as famous players that made their names elsewhere but also made Dodger Stadium their home, if only briefly.

LOS ANGELES -- Remember the best Dodgers moments of future Hall of Famers Jim Bunning, Gary Carter, Juan Marichal, Frank Robinson or Hoyt Wilhelm?

Probably not, but they all wore Dodger Blue. And they weren't alone as far as famous players that made their names elsewhere but also made Dodger Stadium their home, if only briefly.

Today, we take a look at 10 Dodgers who compiled outstanding careers elsewhere but later joined the Dodgers. Some are already in the Hall of Fame, but none is generally remembered for his time in Los Angeles.

This look back is limited to players who were Dodgers in the 2000s, and they are listed in alphabetical order.

Bobby Abreu, 2012
The Dodgers needed a left fielder to platoon with Juan Rivera and signed Abreu in May, shortly after he was released by the Angels to free up at-bats for some kid named Trout. The Dodgers hoped the 38-year-old Abreu still had some offense left. After a hot start as a Dodger, Abreu finished hitting .246 with a .704 OPS and the 16-year veteran was reduced to a pinch-hitter's role, even accepting a Minor League demotion in August before a recall in September.

Rickey Henderson, 2003
Rickey was 44 when the Dodgers signed him at the All-Star break out of independent ball, because Rickey wasn't ready to retire. The greatest basestealer and leadoff hitter of all-time hit only .208 in 30 games for the Dodgers, but walked 11 times, scored seven runs and stole three bases. The Dodgers were then done with Rickey, but Rickey wasn't done with baseball and the next year he went back to independent ball, which didn't prevent his first-ballot Hall of Fame induction.

Video: STL@LA: Henderson belts his final Major League homer

Andruw Jones, 2008
This didn't go well. The two-year, $36.2 million contract he received was a disaster, as Jones reported to his first Dodgers Spring Training overweight, played poorly, complained about the fans and needed knee surgery. With the phenomenal arrival of Manny Ramirez during the 2008 season, the Dodgers didn't even bring Jones back for the second year and deferred paying the remaining $18 million to help re-sign Ramirez.

Kenny Lofton, 2006
After dealing Milton Bradley to Oakland in one of his first moves, GM Ned Colletti signed Lofton to play center field and bat second behind new leadoff hitter Rafael Furcal. Lofton, who had played for Colletti with the Giants, hit .301, but after one season the Dodgers signed Juan Pierre to a five-year deal and Lofton left as a free agent.

Fred McGriff, 2003
The Dodgers gave up on first-base fixture Eric Karros after the 2002 season and turned to the Crime Dog, seeking left-handed power. Only 22 homers shy of 500 when he signed with the Dodgers, the 39-year-old McGriff's Hall of Fame bid was derailed when he struggled through an injury-plagued season to hit just 13 homers with 40 RBIs during his one-year stay.

Greg Maddux, 2006, 2008
GM Ned Colletti liked the Hall of Famer so much from their days together with the Cubs that he acquired him twice. Colletti sent Cesar Izturis to the Cubs in 2006 for Maddux, who pitched six hitless innings in his Dodgers debut, then eight scoreless innings in his third start, going 6-3. Maddux was 42 in 2008 when Colletti sent two Minor Leaguers to the Padres for an encore, with Maddux going 2-4 down the stretch and reduced to a relief role in a playoff loss to the Phils before retiring.

Jim Thome, 2009
The future first-ballot Hall of Famer was the biggest name in a flurry of Dodgers late-season acquisitions, waiving his no-trade clause with the White Sox for a chance to win a World Series. But the 39-year-old almost immediately suffered a foot injury and could do nothing more than try to pinch-hit, going 4-for-17 with seven strikeouts and no extra-base hits.

David Wells, 2007
Injuries to starting pitchers Jason Schmidt, Randy Wolf and Hong-Chih Kuo led the Dodgers to sign the 44-year-old Wells, who had been released by the Padres. Wells became the oldest Dodgers pitcher to start a game and went 4-1 down the stretch, despite a 5.12 ERA, but the Dodgers finished fourth and Wells retired.

Video: SF@LAD: Wells goes six innings in final career start

Brian Wilson, 2013-14
The unthinkable happened when the Dodgers signed a former Giants nemesis coming off elbow surgery in the middle of the season. What seemed a moonshot turned into a remarkable renaissance, as Wilson assumed the tricky setup role for Kenley Jansen and went 2-1 with a 0.66 ERA. He parlayed that into a two-year extension but was injured the next Spring Training and the club eventually released him and ate $21 million.

Michael Young, 2013
Another deadline acquisition targeted to provide bench depth, Young waived a no-trade clause to be that hitter of quality and character. He appeared in 21 games, starting at least once at each of the four infield positions, batting .314 with a .713 OPS. He went 1-for-10 in the postseason, after which he rejected an offer to return and instead retired.

Ken Gurnick has covered the Dodgers for MLB.com since 2001.

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