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Gonzales reinstated; Mariners call up 2 righties

MLB.com

SEATTLE -- Marco Gonzales was reinstated from the 10-day disabled list to start Tuesday night's series opener against the Padres at Safeco Field, while the club also promoted right-handed relievers Matt Festa and Nick Rumbelow as its final September callups.

Gonzales missed two starts with a cervical muscle strain in his neck, an issue that hindered his past few outings in a rough August. The 26-year-old lefty is 12-9 with a 4.32 ERA in 25 starts on the year, but he went 0-4 with a 10.35 ERA in four starts last month before going on the DL on Aug. 27.

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SEATTLE -- Marco Gonzales was reinstated from the 10-day disabled list to start Tuesday night's series opener against the Padres at Safeco Field, while the club also promoted right-handed relievers Matt Festa and Nick Rumbelow as its final September callups.

Gonzales missed two starts with a cervical muscle strain in his neck, an issue that hindered his past few outings in a rough August. The 26-year-old lefty is 12-9 with a 4.32 ERA in 25 starts on the year, but he went 0-4 with a 10.35 ERA in four starts last month before going on the DL on Aug. 27.

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Festa and Rumbelow were recalled from Double-A Arkansas after the Travelers finished their postseason run on Sunday with a loss in the final game of the Texas League Division Series.

Festa, the Mariners' No. 8 prospect per MLB Pipeline, will be making his third stint with Seattle. He pitched 2 2/3 innings in two prior outings, allowing one run and one walk. The 25-year-old rookie went 5-2 with 20 saves and a 2.76 ERA in 44 relief appearances for Arkansas, with 67 strikeouts and 12 walks, and he was named to the Texas League Postseason All-Star team.

Video: SEA@COL: Festa strands a pair in his MLB debut

Rumbelow has made nine appearances for the Mariners in four prior big league stints this year, posting a 6.75 ERA with nine strikeouts and three walks in 13 1/3 innings. He missed the first two months of the season with a nerve issue in his neck, and then he went 1-0 with two saves and a 2.04 ERA in 13 outings for Triple-A Tacoma before finishing with two scoreless innings in two outings with Arkansas.

With their latest additions, the Mariners now have 38 players on their active roster for the final 19 games of the season.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners, Matt Festa, Marco Gonzales, Nick Rumbelow

Rodriguez, 17, impresses Mariners on, off field

MLB.com

PHOENIX -- Locals refer to the area northwest of the city limits as the West Valley.

It's known for its beautiful mountain landscapes, scenic hikes and challenging bike trails. The appropriately named Lake Pleasant is there, too, as is the Peoria Sports Complex, the Spring Training home of the Padres and Mariners.

PHOENIX -- Locals refer to the area northwest of the city limits as the West Valley.

It's known for its beautiful mountain landscapes, scenic hikes and challenging bike trails. The appropriately named Lake Pleasant is there, too, as is the Peoria Sports Complex, the Spring Training home of the Padres and Mariners.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

Seattle prospect Julio Rodriguez, 17, lives in a hotel with his teammates less than a mile from the famous baseball complex, and this is where you will find him until the middle of November. Rodriguez, who ranks No. 4 among Mariners prospects and is fresh off winning the team's Dominican Summer League Most Valuable Player Award, has entered the next phase of his development. It's the Mariners' goal to turn him into a high-impact player on and off the field. The Arizona suburb is where they will do it.

"We couldn't be happier with the first pro year, both what he did on the field in terms of his performance - both with his bat and his defense - and what he was able to do in the classroom in terms of high school curriculum, English, cultural simulation," said Andy McKay, the Mariners' Director of Player Development. "All those things have gone wonderfully well, and we want to build on it."

Video: Top Prospects: Julio Rodriguez, OF, Mariners

Rodriguez, who was the No. 10 international prospect when he signed with club for $1.75 million in 2017, dominated the Dominican Summer League. He hit .315/.404/.525 and had more hits (69) than games played (59). The outfielder also racked up 13 doubles, nine triples, five home runs, 36 RBIs and 10 stolen bases. He also scored 50 runs and walked 30 times.

The teen was sent to Arizona at the conclusion of the DSL late last month to continue training and get treated for a foot injury. He's staying in town to participate in the team's six-week high-performance camp that focuses on developing the mind and body that starts on Oct. 1. Rodriguez will also attend the club's Minor League mini-camp in February at the complex.

"We're trying to build athleticism in our players -- strength, and flexibility," McKay said. "We're spending a lot of time in the weight room, in the training room, a lot of time in our classroom with mental skills and leadership programs, community service programs. Basically, anything that we can do that doesn't involve being on the field playing."

The Mariners will have a better idea where Rodriguez will start the 2019 season after Spring Training. His effort during the club's high-performance camp will also factor into their decision.

"One thing with our young international players is that you're also measuring how much supervision they need," McKay said. "You're measuring ability to communicate and cultural issues. Again, you're talking about a 17-year-old. We are not in a hurry. He could be in the Arizona League, he could be up in Everett (Short-Season Class A) or in Clinton (Low A), and that'll all play itself out."

Tweet from @J_Rod_44: It was a fun day.

Rodriguez is up for the challenge. He says life in the United States has been an adjustment, but it's also been fun. He's glad he studied English in school in the Dominican Republic, so he does not have to deal with some of the language issues some of his Spanish-speaking only teammates face.

The biggest hardship he faces is the most obvious one.

"I'm only 17 and to leave your family and move to another country is not easy," he said in Spanish. "Honestly, it's really hard, but I'm working for them. I'm following my dream for me and for family."

The Mariners discovered Rodriguez at a tryout in the city of Santiago on the northern part of the island when he was 14. He flashed his athleticism during the workout and the Seattle scouts were also impressed with his makeup in their post-workout conversations. Rodriguez immediately became the club's no. 1 target.

"He was a high-profile international signing and it'd be hard to say he has not shown up and clearly shown to everybody why he was signed," McKay said. "Julio is very confident with a lot of personality, but at the same time, he performs. He works at it. He cares, and he wants to be great."

These days, Rodriguez wakes up at 5:30 a.m. and is at the Peoria Sports Complex 90 minutes later. There's usually a quick breakfast, followed by a stop in the training room before he hits the field for drills. He hits in the batting cages three times a week, lifts weights, and watches more video than he ever has in his life. He ignores the hiking, biking and other city attractions. Instead, he plays video games with his teammates during his free time. His favorite place to eat is a drive-thru restaurant near the hotel and complex that specializes in serving chicken sandwiches with two sliced pickles inside and a side of waffle fries.

"The key for me is being dedicated and focused," Rodriguez said. "Everything I do, I really focus on it and take 100-percent advantage of opportunities given to me. I've learned so much about the details of the game and all of these small things are going to help me become a big player."

Jesse Sanchez, who has been writing for MLB.com since 2001, is a national reporter based in Phoenix. Follow him on Twitter @JesseSanchezMLB and Facebook.

Seattle Mariners

Mariners recall Festa, send Bergman to Triple-A

MLB.com

SEATTLE -- The usual September callup came a couple of weeks early for right-hander Matt Festa, the Mariners' No. 8 prospect, on Saturday.

Festa will join the Mariners for his second big league stint of 2018 after continuing to pitch well in relief for Double-A Arkansas. In a corresponding move, reliever Christian Bergman -- who threw 2 2/3 innings of relief in Friday's 11-1 loss -- was optioned to Triple-A Tacoma.

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SEATTLE -- The usual September callup came a couple of weeks early for right-hander Matt Festa, the Mariners' No. 8 prospect, on Saturday.

Festa will join the Mariners for his second big league stint of 2018 after continuing to pitch well in relief for Double-A Arkansas. In a corresponding move, reliever Christian Bergman -- who threw 2 2/3 innings of relief in Friday's 11-1 loss -- was optioned to Triple-A Tacoma.

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Manager Scott Servais wanted to bolster his bullpen in advance of two games in which he won't be turning to one of his regular starters. Erasmo Ramirez got the nod on Saturday for his second start since returning from the disabled list, and the Mariners announced that Roenis Elias will make Sunday's start.

"Just trying to keep as many fresh arms as we can in the bullpen," said Servais. "Erasmo goes tonight and tomorrow Elias will go. I don't know how far he's going to be able to go in the game, so we want to cover as much as we can here in the next few days."

Sunday's start initially belonged to Marco Gonzales, but Servais shuffled the rotation in order to get extra rest for the lefty, who has pitched 142 1/3 innings.

"You do have to keep the big picture," Servais said. "We need Marco to be fresh and to try to keep him as fresh as possible as we go down the stretch here. He's going to be key for us."

Elias is still on the 10-day DL with a triceps strain. He tossed 3 2/3 innings and allowed two earned runs in a spot start vs. San Francisco as part of a 2018 campaign in which he's posted a 2.88 ERA with 18 strikeouts in 25 innings.

Festa made his Major League debut with the Mariners right before the All-Star break in Colorado. He entered in the fifth inning, retiring two batters and allowing one inherited runner to score in a loss to the Rockies.

In 39 appearances with the Travelers, Festa posted a 2.70 ERA and converted 18 of 18 save opportunities, striking out 58 over 43 1/3 innings.

Video: Top Prospects: Matthew Festa, RHP, Mariners

Andreoli to the Orioles
Former Mariners outfielder John Andreoli was claimed off waivers by the Orioles on Saturday.

The Mariners designated Andreoli for assignment on Friday in order to make room on their 40-man roster for infielder Gordon Beckham, who was called up because of Jean Segura's paternity leave.

Seattle is very deep in the outfield, thanks to the acquisition of Cameron Maybin. The Mariners carry four outfielders on their 25-man roster -- Maybin, Mitch Haniger, Denard Span and Guillermo Heredia. They also have Ben Gamel -- who owns a .290/.360/.395 line in 200 at-bats with the Mariners this season -- stashed away in Triple-A.

In 89 games for Tacoma, Andreoli slashed .287/.397/.401. The Orioles optioned the 28-year-old to Triple-A Norfolk.

Video: SEA@OAK: Paxton exits after being hit with comebacker

Paxton progressing
James Paxton has not started throwing, but Servais said the lefty's range of motion is back to normal after he was struck on the forearm by a line drive in the first inning of Tuesday's start against the Athletics. Servais was hopeful that Paxton would start throwing within a few days.

"Hopefully he's not down too long," Servais said. "That's the big thing, the longer he's down, the longer it will take to get him back game-ready."

Daddy Jean

Segura was not in Saturday's lineup, using up the second of a maximum of three days of paternity leave. Servais said he was not sure whether Segura would play on Sunday.

Because Segura was not with the team, he missed Saturday's team photo. Instead, he posted a photo of newborn Jacob on Instagram.

David Gottlieb covers the Mariners for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @DGottliebMLB.

Seattle Mariners, John Andreoli, Matt Festa

Top prospect Lewis promoted to Double-A

No. 5 prospect Bishop likely out for rest of season with fractured arm
MLB.com

SEATTLE -- Kyle Lewis, who represented the Mariners in Sunday's Futures Game in Washington, D.C., has been promoted from Advanced-A Modesto to Double-A Arkansas to take the place of injured outfielder Braden Bishop, general manager Jerry Dipoto said Saturday.

Lewis is the Mariners' No. 1 prospect, per MLB Pipeline, and will get a chance to advance now after batting .260/.303/.428 with five home runs and 32 RBIs in 49 games for Modesto after recovering from offseason surgery to clean up his surgically repaired right knee.

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SEATTLE -- Kyle Lewis, who represented the Mariners in Sunday's Futures Game in Washington, D.C., has been promoted from Advanced-A Modesto to Double-A Arkansas to take the place of injured outfielder Braden Bishop, general manager Jerry Dipoto said Saturday.

Lewis is the Mariners' No. 1 prospect, per MLB Pipeline, and will get a chance to advance now after batting .260/.303/.428 with five home runs and 32 RBIs in 49 games for Modesto after recovering from offseason surgery to clean up his surgically repaired right knee.

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Bishop, Seattle's No. 5-ranked prospect, will likely miss the remainder of the season after fracturing his forearm when hit by a pitch Thursday. Dipoto said Bishop will likely require surgery and is expected to need two months for a full recovery.

Bishop was recently named to the Texas League All-Star team and hit .284/.361/.412 with eight homers and 33 RBIs in 84 games.

Video: LAA@SEA: Bishop lines a triple to right field

Lewis, 23, was Seattle's first-round Draft pick and the 11th overall selection in 2016 out of Mercer University. He injured his knee in a home-plate collision while playing for Class A Short-Season Everett a month after signing with the Mariners, then missed much of 2017 while recovering from that injury.

Bishop, 24, was a third-round Draft pick out of the University of Washington in 2015. Regarded as an excellent defensive center fielder, he impressed the Mariners after being invited to his first Major League camp this spring, but will now be sidelined until 2019.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners

Mariners add No. 9 prospect Festa to bullpen

MLB.com

DENVER -- The Mariners reached into their prospect ranks to add an extra arm to their bullpen on Saturday, promoting Double-A Arkansas closer Matt Festa for his first shot in the Major Leagues.

"It's kind of indescribable, being here," the 25-year-old said after joining the team prior to Saturday night's 4-1 loss to the Rockies. "You walk into this clubhouse and see all the guys you've always looked up to. Some of them I met in Spring Training, but I'm speechless."

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DENVER -- The Mariners reached into their prospect ranks to add an extra arm to their bullpen on Saturday, promoting Double-A Arkansas closer Matt Festa for his first shot in the Major Leagues.

"It's kind of indescribable, being here," the 25-year-old said after joining the team prior to Saturday night's 4-1 loss to the Rockies. "You walk into this clubhouse and see all the guys you've always looked up to. Some of them I met in Spring Training, but I'm speechless."

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The Mariners wasted no time getting Festa into action, as he replaced Wade LeBlanc with one out in the fifth with Ian Desmond on third. The youngster faced the meat of the order, and gave up a pair of singles to Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story, allowing Desmond to score, before he got a pair of groundouts to get out of the inning.

Video: SEA@COL: Festa strands a pair in his MLB debut

"I thought Matt handled it well," manager Scott Servais said. "He wasn't fazed by the moment at all. He'll get some more chances here down the road."

Festa is Seattle's No. 9 prospect, per MLB Pipeline, and has gone 2-2 with a 3.13 ERA and 13 saves in 28 appearances for Arkansas. The 6-foot-2, 195-pound right-hander features a 92-95 mph fastball and quality slider that has helped him rack up 44 strikeouts with just seven walks in 31 2/3 innings this season.

He's the first Draft pick of general manager Jerry Dipoto's first three years in Seattle to get a shot with the big league club and joins outfielder John Andreoli -- who signed as a Minor League free agent last December -- as the second player to make his MLB debut this season for the Mariners.

Festa replaces Christian Bergman, who was optioned back to Triple-A Tacoma after making a spot start in Friday's 10-7 loss to the Rockies. The move gives Seattle 10 relievers for the final two games before the All-Star break, with just three starters currently active since Felix Hernandez and James Paxton are temporarily on the 10-day disabled list to rest sore backs.

It's likely just a chance for Festa to get his feet wet in the Majors, and provide an extra reliever until the starters are brought back after the break, but he's understandably thrilled for the opportunity; Servais said he's eager to see how the youngster performs.

"We'll see," said Servais. "This game is results oriented. You come in and do well and see where it goes from there. We'll reshuffle the deck, obviously, when we get back after the break, but he'll get an opportunity here the next couple days to show us what he's got."

The Mariners have jumped pitchers from Double-A to the big leagues before, most notably closer Edwin Diaz and right-hander Dan Altavilla. Festa knows what he needs to do to stick around.

"Keep my pitch count low, throw strikes and get outs," he said. "That's it."

Festa was a seventh-round Draft pick out of East Stroudsburg University in Pennsylvania in 2016. After moving to the bullpen last year for Class A Advanced Modesto, he posted a 4-2 record and 3.23 ERA with six saves in 42 outings before earning a stint in the Arizona Fall League against the game's premier prospects.

"The Fall League really helped," he said. "I was only in High-A last season, but going in there and playing those guys who are unbelievably talented was good. But the most important part was pitching in the Fall Star Game. That was on television, but that was one of my best outings and I really showed myself I could do this."

Festa was invited to Seattle's Major League camp this spring, but never pitched while dealing with a hip issue. After a slight delay to the start of his season, the New York native has gone 13-for-13 in save situations, and now will get at least some brief exposure to the big leagues.

"When I first was told I was coming up, it was like panic in my head," he said. "I'm thinking, 'It's going to be Colorado, Nolan Arenado.' But as the day went on, I realized it's the same game. You're just playing catch out there. Throw it hard, trust your stuff and it's going to play. A lot of people have backed me up and it helps build my confidence. So, when I go out there, I'm just going to let it rip."

There was no hiding the excitement in Festa's voice, however, as he recalled calling his parents to tell them he'd been promoted to the big leagues.

"Very emotional," he said. "Coming into it I was like, 'I'm too excited. I'm not going to cry.' But you hear your mom's voice and you lose it."

Bergman will rejoin Tacoma's rotation after allowing six hits and five runs in 4 1/3 innings against the Rockies. The 30-year-old is 0-1 with a 3.97 ERA in two starts for Seattle this season and 6-6 with a 4.78 ERA in 18 starts for Tacoma.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners

Mariners beat deadline to sign third-round pick

Haniger out again after injuring knee in wall crash, but no DL expected; top prospect Lewis named to All-Star Futures Game
MLB.com

SEATTLE -- Florida State catcher Cal Raleigh, the Mariners' third-round selection in the June Draft, passed a physical and signed with Seattle just prior to Friday's 2 p.m. PT deadline for college players with remaining eligibility.

Raleigh was the final unsigned pick among Seattle's top 34 choices and the Mariners were pleased to lock him up as the 21-year-old agreed to an $854,000 signing bonus, according to MLB.com's Jim Callis. That was above the slot value of $632,700 for a 90th overall selection and as high as the club could go without exceeding its allowable bonus pool.

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SEATTLE -- Florida State catcher Cal Raleigh, the Mariners' third-round selection in the June Draft, passed a physical and signed with Seattle just prior to Friday's 2 p.m. PT deadline for college players with remaining eligibility.

Raleigh was the final unsigned pick among Seattle's top 34 choices and the Mariners were pleased to lock him up as the 21-year-old agreed to an $854,000 signing bonus, according to MLB.com's Jim Callis. That was above the slot value of $632,700 for a 90th overall selection and as high as the club could go without exceeding its allowable bonus pool.

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General manager Jerry Dipoto said since Raleigh hasn't played for several weeks, he'll remain in Peoria for a few days to take batting practice and hit some live pitching before joining Class A Short-Season Everett.

"We felt he was one of the best catchers in the country in what was a pretty good group," Dipoto said. "The leadership, switch-hitting, he's a good offensive player who has defensive skills. One of the better pitch framers in the country. Fairly advanced, played in a big school in a big conference and it's an opportunity for us to put a polished catcher in the system and I suspect he'll move quickly."

Video: Draft Report: Cal Raleigh, College catcher

Meanwhile, Dipoto said first-round pick Logan Gilbert out of Stetson won't pitch for Everett at all this season after coming down with mononucleosis.

"We'd intended to let him pitch twice, to build up 5-6 innings and mostly interact with his teammates," Dipoto said. "But he's back in Orlando now, spent some time in the hospital and is resting at home. He's going to have a 4-6 week recovery from a pretty nasty case of mono. He should be ready to go in our High Performance camp in September."

Haniger sits out a second game
Manager Scott Servais held Mitch Haniger out of Friday's series opener against the Rockies, but said the outfielder's bruised knee was feeling much better and he might be able to return for Saturday's 1:10 p.m. PT game.

It was the second game Haniger has missed since crashing into the short wall down the right-field line pursuing a foul ball in Wednesday's 7-4 loss to the Angels.

"Yesterday it was really sore, but it's calmed down quite a bit today," Servais said. "He had it looked at by the doctor and it's day to day. Hopefully he goes along good today and he possibly could get back in there tomorrow. He was definitely moving and feeling better."

Triple-A Tacoma outfielder John Andreoli was flown in from Albuquerque, N.M., in case Haniger might miss several games, but won't be activated unless the injury keeps him sidelined longer than expected.

Lewis selected for Futures Game
Kyle Lewis, the Mariners' top-ranked prospect per MLB Pipeline, was named Friday to the U.S. squad for the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game that will be played Sunday, July 15 at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C. as part of the All-Star week festivities.

Video: Top Prospects: Kyle Lewis, OF, Mariners

Lewis, who is the No. 58 overall prospect on MLB Pipeline's rankings, has missed much of the past two seasons while recovering from knee surgery, but is healthy now and has put up a .262/.305/.439 line with five homers and 27 RBIs in 41 games for Class A Advanced Modesto.

The game will be televised on MLB Network and streamed live on MLB.com starting at 1 p.m. PT.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners

Mariners' No. 3 prospect Carlson has TJ surgery

19-year-old right-hander may miss 2019 season
MLB.com

SEATTLE -- Right-handed pitcher Sam Carlson, the Mariners' No. 3-ranked prospect per MLB Pipeline, has undergone Tommy John surgery on his right elbow and will be sidelined the remainder of this season and potentially all of 2019.

The 19-year-old from Minnesota was drafted in the second round by Seattle last year, but pitched just three innings over two appearances in the Arizona Rookie League in 2017 before being shut down with a sore elbow.

SEATTLE -- Right-handed pitcher Sam Carlson, the Mariners' No. 3-ranked prospect per MLB Pipeline, has undergone Tommy John surgery on his right elbow and will be sidelined the remainder of this season and potentially all of 2019.

The 19-year-old from Minnesota was drafted in the second round by Seattle last year, but pitched just three innings over two appearances in the Arizona Rookie League in 2017 before being shut down with a sore elbow.

The arm continued to be a problem this spring and Carlson never got into any games this season. He threw a bullpen session in late May and there was hope at that time of getting him into extended spring training and eventually onto a Minor League club, but that never materialized.

With the typical recovery period of 12-15 months for Tommy John surgery to repair a torn ulnar collateral ligament, Carlson likely won't be ready to pitch competitively until the start of 2020.

The Mariners signed Carlson to a $2 million bonus after he dropped unexpectedly into the second round of the Draft last season, likely because of his option as a high school senior of attending the University of Florida. He immediately was installed as one of Seattle's top young pitching prospects due to his impressive showings on the summer showcase circuit, where he was throwing a mid-90s fastball and a promising slider and changeup.

But that promise will be put on hold now as Carlson goes through rehab, leaving recent first-round Draft pick Logan Gilbert out of Stetson University as the top young starting pitching prospect in the Mariners' Minor League system.

Gilbert has been assigned to Class A Short Season Everett, but the 21-year-old has yet to pitch and likely will be very limited this year as he's coming off a college season where he threw more than 100 innings.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners

Mariners reach deal with No. 7 int'l prospect

Seattle inks nine international players to contracts
MLB.com

SEATTLE -- The international market has been a big talent source for the Mariners over the years and the club dipped into that area again on Monday, announcing agreements with nine players on the first day of the new international signing period.

Heading the group is Noelvi Marte, a 16-year-old shortstop from the Dominican Republic, who is ranked No. 7 on MLB Pipeline'sTop 30 International Prospects list. MLB.com's Jesse Sanchez reports the deal is worth $1,550,000, according to sources.

SEATTLE -- The international market has been a big talent source for the Mariners over the years and the club dipped into that area again on Monday, announcing agreements with nine players on the first day of the new international signing period.

Heading the group is Noelvi Marte, a 16-year-old shortstop from the Dominican Republic, who is ranked No. 7 on MLB Pipeline'sTop 30 International Prospects list. MLB.com's Jesse Sanchez reports the deal is worth $1,550,000, according to sources.

"Our scouts identified Noelvi Marte as a player with impact speed and power," said Tim Kissner, the Mariners' director of international scouting. "Those skills, combined with his ability to hit, pushed him to the top of this international signing class. His makeup and instincts for the game are well above average, and we believe he will excel once he begins working with our player development group."

Video: Jerry Dipoto on international signing Noelvi Marte

According to Sanchez, the 6-foot-1, 181-pounder is known for his power bat but he also has shown good mechanics at the plate, where he creates a lot of backspin and loft at contact. There's a belief he could hit .270 with 25-30 home runs in the big leagues one day. He is currently a shortstop and has a good feel for the position, but could shift to third base as he grows. Scouts like his hands and athleticism.

Marte is one of four infielders in the group, along with Asdrubal Bueno from Venezuela, Luis Chevalier from the Dominican Republic and Carlos Fernandez from Panama. Seattle also signed outfielder Jonathan Clase from the DR and first baseman/outfielder Gabe Moncada from Venezuela.

The Mariners also announced the signing of three pitchers -- left-hander Jose Aquino from the Dominican Republic, right-handers Adbiel Medina from Panama and Wilton Perez from the DR.

"We're very excited about the versatility of this group," Kissner said. "It's a well-balanced class of pitchers and position players who all possess the athleticism and the character to progress through our Minor League system. Each of the nine players we signed today has the skills and the makeup to make an impact in our organization over the next several years."

According to the rules established by the Collective Bargaining Agreement, clubs that received a Competitive Balance Pick in Round B of the MLB Draft received a pool of $6,025,400, while teams that received a Competitive Balance Pick in Round A of the Draft received $5,504,500. All other clubs, including the Mariners, received $4,983,500.

Teams are allowed to trade as much of their international pool money as they would like, but can only acquire 75 percent of a club's initial pool amount. Additionally, signing bonuses of $10,000 or less do not count toward a team's bonus pool, and foreign professional players who are at least 25 and have played in a foreign league for at least six seasons are also exempt.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners

Mariners' first-round Draft pick Gilbert signs

Seattle inks No. 14 overall selection to slot value
MLB.com

SEATTLE -- Logan Gilbert took the first step in his professional career on Saturday, and it was a lucrative one, as the right-hander out of Stetson University finalized a contract with the Mariners. He will head soon to Class A Everett, though his innings will be limited this season after a heavy workload in college.

The 21-year-old agreed to a $3,883,800 signing bonus, according to MLB Pipeline's Jim Callis, which is the slot value money assigned to the No. 14 overall position where he was selected last week by Seattle.

SEATTLE -- Logan Gilbert took the first step in his professional career on Saturday, and it was a lucrative one, as the right-hander out of Stetson University finalized a contract with the Mariners. He will head soon to Class A Everett, though his innings will be limited this season after a heavy workload in college.

The 21-year-old agreed to a $3,883,800 signing bonus, according to MLB Pipeline's Jim Callis, which is the slot value money assigned to the No. 14 overall position where he was selected last week by Seattle.

"He's been pretty much a workhorse at Stetson," Mariners amateur scouting director Scott Hunter said. "He started his first live game, an intersquad game, in January, so he's pretty much at his innings limit. We'll ease him in. If he throws a few innings this summer, it'll be icing on the cake. But it's not going to be a heavy workload whatsoever. We're about getting him ready for our [high-performance] camp in the fall."

Tweet from @Mariners: Making the rounds. pic.twitter.com/OUjpb0aj6N

Gilbert was at Safeco Field on Friday to watch the Mariners' 7-6 come-from-behind victory over the Red Sox in front of more than 44,000 fans, and that definitely gave him a taste of what he'll be working toward in the upcoming seasons.

"It was crazy," Gilbert said. "It was a good game to be at, with the comeback and how they played. It was an awesome atmosphere and all that stuff. Just imagining being out there in a couple years, it was pretty cool. I'm ready to get to work. I'm excited to get to Everett and hopefully get to throw a little bit. And hopefully work my way up over the next few years."

Video: Hunter on Mariners drafting Gilbert 14th overall

The Mariners also announced the signings of Georgia outfielder Keegan McGovern (their ninth-round pick) and Benjamin Onyshko (24th round), a left-handed pitcher also out of Stetson.

The Mariners have now signed 32 of their 40 Draft selections, including 28 of the top 30. The only top-10 pick who hasn't signed is third-rounder Cal Raleigh, a catcher from Florida State.

Gilbert went 11-2 with a 2.72 ERA in 16 starts this year as a junior, with 163 strikeouts and 25 walks in 107 innings, and he was named the Atlantic Sun Conference Pitcher of the Year. His 163 strikeouts were the most by any NCAA Division I pitcher. Over three seasons, Gilbert posted a 23-3 record with a 2.48 ERA in 52 games, including 33 starts.

The 6-foot-6 right-hander is less than two semesters shy of graduating with a degree in business systems and analytics from the private school of about 3,000 students in DeLand, Fla.

That education clearly could come into use in a Mariners organization that leans heavily on analytics.

"I think it's going to be big," Gilbert said. "I didn't use it a ton in college. There wasn't a ton of data really that we had to use. But that's who I am and how my mind works. I'm an analytical type of person. So I look forward in the future to being able to utilize that in different ways. I think it'll help my game to have extra information and data to use."

Gilbert wasn't highly recruited out of high school, where he was a 4.0 student at Wekiva High in Apopka, Fla., so he jumped at the chance to go to Stetson, which has a tradition of producing top pitchers. Indians standout Corey Kluber was a fourth-round pick by the Padres in 2007 out of Stetson and Jacob deGrom was a ninth-round selection by the Mets in '10.

Gilbert is something of a late bloomer, not fully committing to pitching until his final years of high school. But once that decision came, his dad built a mound in the family's backyard in Florida and the work hasn't stopped since.

"Most of the time, kids have their own batting cages," Hunter said, "but that might have been my first with their own mound. I know one thing we're definitely getting is the work ethic and upside and passion for the game. It's amazing what he's done on his own over the course of his career. And where he wants to get to, it's refreshing as an organization that we're getting that kind of human, too."

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners

Seattle scouting director on Draft: 'Really strong'

Mariners focus on high-upside college talent, late-round 'diamonds in the rough'
MLB.com

The Mariners wrapped up the 2018 MLB Draft on Wednesday, and with their selections in rounds 11-40 on Day 3, Seattle hopes to have found not only future Major League stalwarts for the franchise, but also some diamonds in the rough.

Draft Tracker: Every Mariners pick

The Mariners wrapped up the 2018 MLB Draft on Wednesday, and with their selections in rounds 11-40 on Day 3, Seattle hopes to have found not only future Major League stalwarts for the franchise, but also some diamonds in the rough.

Draft Tracker: Every Mariners pick

The Mariners' Draft week began with the selection of a pitcher in the first round for the first time since 2011 -- when the organization picked Virginia's Danny Hultzen at No. 2 overall -- selecting Stetson University right-hander Logan Gilbert with the 14th pick in Monday's first round.

Seattle wrapped Day 1 by drafting another college player, Louisville's Josh Stowers, in Round 2. The selections of Gilbert and Stowers kicked off a Draft-wide trend for the Mariners, who went heavy on adding high-upside college talent to their Minor League ranks.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

Of the Mariners' 40 draft picks, 33 are college players. Seattle didn't draft a high schooler until Day 3, when the organization selected Damon Casetta-Stubbs, a right-handed pitcher out of nearby Kings Way Christian Schools (Wash.), in the 11th round. Casetta-Stubs told The Columbian that he agreed to a $350,000 signing bonus -- well above the $125,000 allotted for Rounds 11-40 -- to forgo his commitment to Seattle University and join the Mariners' Rookie-level affiliate in Peoria, Ariz.

Mariners director of amateur scouting Scott Hunter said that the high school players Seattle was targeting went off the board early, and established college players fit with the organization's plan to bolster its upper Minor League levels and improve a farm system often ranked among the lowest in baseball.

"Only time will tell, but we feel really strong about what we did over the last three days," Hunter said. "We were pretty college-heavy, but if you look at the depth of the Draft this year, and so many teams that had multiple picks, a lot of these high school guys were gone, and we had a lot of things in the works that just didn't get to us. We did a very good job of finding some junior college kids, some Division II players we feel very strongly about, saved a little bit of money in the first 10 picks, and then we got a little bit aggressive on some high school pitching."

That high school pitching came in the 11th round, the first of Wednesday's Day 3 of the Draft, when Seattle selected Casetta-Stubbs. The 6-foot-4, 200-pound right-hander has seen his fastball improve dramatically this season, clocked up to 96 mph.

"Casetta-Stubbs is a Mariners fan, and while he did have quite a big number in regards to signability in the top 10 rounds, we met with him and the family and his representative, and just seeing what we were doing here and how he could grow and develop, the family and him came off their number a little bit, and that's why we were able to make a run at him. He's pretty exciting for us."

Another Day 3 pick Hunter is particularly excited about is a pitcher he refers to as "Big Country," J.T. Salter out of the University of West Alabama. Salter is a 6-foot-7, 300-pound right-hander with raw stuff that, if harnessed, could translate into special things at the big league level.

Seattle selected Salter in the 20th round, 598th overall. Featuring a 95-mph fastball along with an 86-mph slider, he posted a 2.65 ERA with 118 strikeouts in 88 1/3 innings for West Alabama this season, earning a first-team All-Gulf South Conference selection.

"We started looking at the video, and we couldn't believe it. He's a massive human being, he's athletic, his arm works, his delivery works, he throws strikes, and now getting him out of West Alabama, we're hoping he's a diamond in the rough," said Hunter. "Once he learns how to really control what he's doing, since he doesn't really have a long track record of having any pitching gurus or real instruction, what he's doing and his size sparked some real interest."

Another selection that Hunter spotlighted was outfielder Cesar Trejo, selected in the 17th round out of the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. In three collegiate seasons, Trejo slashed .333/.400/.557 with 26 home runs and 29 steals in 161 games.

"A 65 runner, a plus arm, has some rawness at the plate, but staying with our motto of trying to get a tools-oriented, athletic-oriented player, along with all of our filters, this is a true five-tool guy that, if he develops into the player we think he can be, has a chance to impact the game on multiple levels," Hunter said.

The Mariners dedicated their final selection of the Draft, right-hander David Rhodes out of Langley Secondary School in White Rock, British Columbia, to longtime scout Wayne Norton, who passed away in January. Norton, a native of Port Moody, British Columbia, covered Canada as a Mariners scout beginning in 2000.

"Wayne Norton is a legend, and I have the utmost respect for him and his wife, Trudy, to whom we sent the video of us selecting this player," Hunter said. "It was a moment we wanted to dedicate to Wayne, but also David Rhodes, because kids in Canada all know Wayne Norton, and to do that in Wayne's honor, and for this kid, we all thought that was a special moment."

Manny Randhawa is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Chad Thornburg is a reporter for MLB.com based in Los Angeles.

Seattle Mariners

Mariners' focus on college talent on Day 2

Catcher Raleigh, lefty Plassmeyer among club's 8 selections
MLB.com

SEATTLE -- Looking to bolster their upper Minor League levels with a strong infusion of young talent, the Mariners hit the college ranks hard on Day 2 of the MLB Draft on Tuesday.

After selecting Stetson right-hander Logan Gilbert and Louisville outfielder Josh Stowers in the first two rounds on Monday, Seattle continued adding established college players with all eight of its picks on Tuesday.

SEATTLE -- Looking to bolster their upper Minor League levels with a strong infusion of young talent, the Mariners hit the college ranks hard on Day 2 of the MLB Draft on Tuesday.

After selecting Stetson right-hander Logan Gilbert and Louisville outfielder Josh Stowers in the first two rounds on Monday, Seattle continued adding established college players with all eight of its picks on Tuesday.

Draft Tracker: Follow every Mariners Draft pick

The Mariners tabbed four more pitchers as well as two promising catchers, an outfielder and shortstop on the second day.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

Scouting director Scott Hunter said the high school players the club was interested in went off the board early, but the college players fit well with the organization's desire to add talent capable of moving quickly up the system.

"We're trying to create waves of talent, and hopefully these kids will start jelling together," he said. "It does solidify the middle of our organization a little. Because we were so thin, we looked to build up from the college ranks so [Class A Advanced] Modesto and Double-A [Arkansas] get a little more stable. It does give you comfort if you build up the foundation of an organization and then you can start swinging for the fences a little."

Mariners draft Stetson righty Gilbert at No. 14

Hunter said eight of the 10 players have already committed to signing and he's hopeful the other two come to terms once their collegiate seasons end.

The Draft concludes on Wednesday, with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at 9 a.m. PT.

Here are Tuesday's selections:

Round 3: C Cal Raleigh, Florida State
The 21-year-old is an intriguing catching prospect as a switch-hitter with power and a high on-base percentage. Raleigh posted a .326/.447/.583 slash line at FSU with 13 home runs and 54 RBIs in 62 games this season and was a first-team All-Atlantic Coast Conference selection.

At 6-foot-3, 225 pounds, Raleigh has good size and has been extremely durable as a three-year starter for the Seminoles. He is regarded as a good pitch framer who still needs work behind the plate to develop his defensive skills. But he's a good enough athlete to have been a basketball standout as well at Smokey Mountain High in Cullowhee, N.C., where he was the conference player of the year and led his team to regional championships in back-to-back years.

Raleigh comes from a baseball family. His father, Todd, played at Western Carolina before signing with the Red Sox and serving as the head coach at Western Carolina (2000-07) and Tennessee (2008-11). His uncle, Matt, was a 14th round Draft pick of the Expos and played 10 seasons in the Minors.

Round 4: LH Michael Plassmeyer, Missouri
The 6-foot-2 junior left-hander emerged as Missouri's top pitcher this season, going 5-4 with a 3.06 ERA with 103 strikeouts and 17 walks in 91 1/3 innings over 14 starts. While not a power arm with a fastball in the 87-90 range, the 21-year-old has outstanding control and a high spin rate that helped him rack up 199 strikeouts with just 35 walks over three collegiate seasons.

The Mariners have an inside connection with Plassmeyer as he worked with current bullpen coach Brian DeLunas at Premier Pitching and Performance in his native St. Louis before DeLunas took a job on Seattle's coaching staff this season.

Plassmeyer's older brother, Mitch, is a pitcher for Bradley University and they both worked out at DeLunas' facility last summer. After a disappointing sophomore season where he posted a 4.83 ERA and lost his starting role in midseason, Plassmeyer improved his velocity several miles per hour and looks like a lefty on the upswing. In three years at Missouri, his ERA dropped each year from 5.12 to 4.83 to 3.06 and his opponent batting average went from .350 to .285 to .249.

Round 5: RH Nolan Hoffman, Texas A&M
The side-arming reliever broke out with a big junior season after transferring from Hutchinson (Kansas) Community College, going 3-1 with a school-record-tying 14 saves and a 1.15 ERA in 33 outings for the Aggies. The 6-foot-4 right-hander had 53 strikeouts and 12 walks in 55 innings and he was one of 20 finalists for the 2018 Pitcher of the Year award from the College Baseball Foundation.

Hoffman, 20, was a starter at Hutchinson CC and set a school record with 168 strikeouts in 160 innings in his two seasons. He was 8-1 with a 3.43 ERA in 13 starts as a sophomore.

But Hoffman was struggling early at Texas A&M until coach Rob Childress suggested he try a submarine-style delivery in the fall. He wound up quickly developing that style with a fastball in the 89-92 range to go with a slider and changeup that allowed him success against both right- and left-handed hitters.

Round 6: Joey O'Brien, RHP, College of Southern Nevada
O'Brien grew up in Japan, where his father took up residence after being stationed in Okinawa in his long military career, but O'Brien moved to the United States to live with an uncle while playing baseball the past two years for the junior college in Henderson, Nev.

The 20-year-old was a two-way standout for the Coyotes, posting a .330/.457/.549 line with nine homers and 52 RBIs in 57 games as an outfielder this season. But the Mariners drafted him as a pitcher after he went 6-4 with a 2.61 ERA with 69 strikeouts and 16 walks in 51 2/3 innings in 17 games and showed a fastball up to 94 mph.

O'Brien has signed a letter of intent to play for Hawaii.

Round 7: Jake Anchia, C, Nova Southeastern University (Fla.)
The 21-year-old catcher has some pop in his bat, hitting .340/.402/.713 with 22 homers and 64 RBIs in 51 games this past season as a junior. The Miami native is 6-foot-1, 210 pounds and he was a four-year letterwinner at Archbishop McCarthy High where he helped his team win three state titles.

He hit eight home runs his first year at Nova Southeastern to break the school's freshman record of five set in 2007 by Tigers standout J.D. Martinez and he followed up by batting .326 with 17 homers and 55 RBIs as a sophomore.

Round 8: RH Joey Gerber, Illinois
Expected by many to land in the fourth to fifth rounds, the 21-year-old fell to the Mariners and they happily added another strong-armed college reliever to their mix. Gerber never started a game in college, but he features a 92-96 mph fastball and sharp slider that proved effective out of the 'pen.

The 6-foot-4 right-hander is a three-time All-Big-10 Academic selection as an accounting major and his numbers added up this year for the Illini bullpen as well, when he struck out 45 with 14 walks in 28 2/3 innings with a 3.14 ERA and a school-record-tying 14 saves in 14 opportunities.

Round 9: CF Keegan McGovern, Georgia
McGovern was the first fourth-year senior selected by Seattle and he brings a left-handed power bat, hitting .319/.431/.644 with 18 homers and 50 RBIs in 58 games this season while earning first-team All-SEC honors.

The Mariners are listing McGovern as a center fielder, though he played primarily left field as a four-year starter at Georgia. The 22-year-old also became the first Bulldog to be named the SEC Baseball Scholar-Athlete of the Year since current Mariners infielder Gordon Beckham in 2008. He's a biology major who also was a two-time selection to the SEC Community Service Team.

Round 10: SS Matt Sanders, Troy University
Seattle's second fourth-year senior selection is a speedy 21-year-old who hit .378/.463/.538 with five home runs, 26 stolen bases and an NCAA Division I-leading 90 runs in 63 games this season. At 5-foot-8, 175 pounds, Sanders doesn't bring a lot of power, but he has good range and is a strong defender in the middle infield.

The Alabama native finished his senior season with more walks (44) than strikeouts (33) and hiked his OBP from .380 as a junior to .463.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners

Mariners draft Stetson righty Gilbert at No. 14

'This kid fit every checkpoint of a pitcher we'd want to select,' Hunter says
MLB.com

SEATTLE -- Logan Gilbert became the highest pick ever out of Stetson University when the Mariners grabbed him with the 14th selection in the first round of Monday's MLB Draft, but that doesn't mean his school hasn't produced some standouts in the past.

Draft Tracker: Follow every Mariners Draft pick

SEATTLE -- Logan Gilbert became the highest pick ever out of Stetson University when the Mariners grabbed him with the 14th selection in the first round of Monday's MLB Draft, but that doesn't mean his school hasn't produced some standouts in the past.

Draft Tracker: Follow every Mariners Draft pick

If Gilbert comes anywhere near a couple other Stetson right-handers -- Corey Kluber of the Indians and Jacob deGrom of the Mets -- the Mariners will be plenty happy.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

The Mariners landed center fielder Josh Stowers, a speedster out of University of Louisville, with their second-round selection. The Draft continues on Tuesday with Rounds 3-10. The MLB.com preview show begins at 9:30 a.m. PT, with exclusive coverage beginning at 10 a.m. PT.

"This is awesome," Gilbert said after his name was called by the Mariners. "This is everything I ever dreamed of, all the way since I started playing baseball. It finally happened. But this isn't the end. This is just the beginning. I'm ready to get to work now."

The 21-year-old junior still has a little work still to do at Stetson, however, for a team headed to the NCAA Super Regionals this weekend to play North Carolina. Gilbert has gone 11-1 with a 2.52 ERA in 15 starts this year, with 157 strikeouts and 23 walks in 107 innings and was named the Atlantic Sun Conference Pitcher of the Year.

Scott Hunter, the Mariners director of amateur scouting, said there's a lot to like about the 6-foot-6 right-hander, who is less than two semesters shy of graduating with a degree in business systems and analytics from the private school of about 3,000 students in DeLand, Fla.

"In the Cape Cod League he was throwing 94-97 mph with an easy fastball," Hunter said. "He's tall, athletic, with a loose, easy arm. He's got four pitches and throws a ton of strikes. And if you look at his stat line over the last three years, he misses bats. That's something we value here. This kid fit every checkpoint of a pitcher we'd want to select and we were pleasantly surprised he was still sitting there."

Hunter said Gilbert was ranked in the top 3-4 players in the Draft last summer by many scouts in the Mariners organization after his Cape Cod showing. But eyebrows raised -- and some other Major League teams backed off a bit -- when his velocity began dipping midway through his collegiate season.

Gilbert said he just tired a bit from the long year on the mound, but bounced back after a week's rest and is topping out again now at 95 mph with his fastball. Hunter credited Rob Mummau, the Mariners' area scout in Southwest Florida, for staying on top of Gilbert's progress and recognizing that he was quickly back to form.

"He's been pitching lights-out the past month," Hunter said. "We actually started getting worried he might [get selected] before us, but there were a couple surprise picks with some high school hitters that we didn't expect to go that pushed Logan down to us. We're pretty excited to get this kind of arm where we did."

Video: Draft 2018: Mariners draft RHP Logan Gilbert No. 14

Once Stetson's season is done, Gilbert sounds ready to sign, and Hunter said he'd likely initially pitch in the Arizona Rookie League and perhaps with Class A Everett, though much depends on the amount of work accumulated since he's already thrown 107 innings this college season.

"That was something we discussed with his advisor," Hunter said of signing. "Once they're done playing, that was part of the agreement verbally. They are in a regional, but once he's done playing, I would like to think he'll be in a Mariner uniform and up here quite quickly."

Gilbert said he wasn't highly recruited out of high school, where he was a 4.0 student at Wekiva High in Apopka, Fla., so he jumped at the chance to go to Stetson, which has a tradition of producing top pitchers. Kluber was a fourth-round pick by the Padres in 2007 and deGrom was a ninth-rounder by the Mets in '10.

Tweet from @Mariners: Crunch time.Take a peek inside Director of Amateur Scouting Scott Hunter's draft room. #MLBDraft pic.twitter.com/Y6p4XQ8ejF

Over three seasons at Stetson, Gilbert posted a 23-2 record with a 2.38 ERA in 51 games, including 32 starts.

The Mariners hadn't drafted a pitcher in the first round since 2011, when they took Virginia's Danny Hultzen with the second overall pick.

Seattle went for an impact position player with its second-round pick as Stowers is a 6-foot, 205-pounder who stole 36 bases this season while posting a .336/.477/.559 line with nine home runs in 62 games as a junior at Louisville.

Video: Draft 2018: Mariners draft CF Josh Stowers No. 54

"Josh becomes another one of the athletes we're putting into the system," Hunter said. "He's a top-of-the-scale speed guy who has some power. A very athletic guy who controls the strike zone. He walks more than he strikes out, has power and is a gamer. We're very excited to add another athlete to the program."

Stowers got off to a slow start in his junior year, but Hunter said his stock rose quickly once his offensive game took off again after a strong Cape Cod showing as well.

The 21-year-old has already agreed to sign with Seattle and Hunter expects him to be at the team's post-Draft minicamp next week in Arizona and to start the season in Everett.

Hunter said both first-day picks have plenty of room for continued development.

"Having this type of athlete and this kind of upside in college players, who are both on the younger side of the college age, we're excited about it," he said. "Hopefully they can start pushing Evan White and Kyle Lewis [the first-round picks the previous two years] and get in that mix where we start building waves of talent that every year we have guys coming and can eventually help our Major League team."

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners

Mariners might take college hurler in 1st round

Club selected collegiate pitchers with six of first 10 picks in '17
MLB.com

SEATTLE -- After making numerous trades and dealing with injuries to some of their top prospects, the Mariners will look to bolster their farm system depth when they take part in the MLB Draft.

SEATTLE -- After making numerous trades and dealing with injuries to some of their top prospects, the Mariners will look to bolster their farm system depth when they take part in the MLB Draft.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

The 2018 Draft will take place today through Wednesday, beginning with the Draft preview show on MLB Network and MLB.com at 3 p.m. PT. MLB Network will broadcast the first 43 picks (Round 1 and Competitive Balance Round A), while MLB.com will stream all 78 picks on Day 1. MLB.com will also provide live pick-by-pick coverage of Rounds 3-10 on Day 2, with a preview show beginning at 9:30 a.m. PT. Then, Rounds 11-40 can be heard live on MLB.com on Day 3, beginning at 9 a.m. PT.

Go to MLB.com/draft to see the Top 200 Prospects list, projected top picks from MLB Pipeline analysts Jim Callis and Jonathan Mayo, the complete order of selection and more. And follow @MLBDraft on Twitter to see what Draft hopefuls, clubs and experts are saying. Here's how the Draft is shaping up for the Mariners, whose first selection is the 14th overall pick.

In about 50 words
General manager Jerry Dipoto prefers to tap college talent with his top picks and that trend likely will continue when Seattle selects in Monday's first round. The Mariners are thin on top-level prospects, but love the athleticism of their last two first rounders -- outfielder Kyle Lewis and first baseman Evan White. Now they need to keep those two healthy after some injury issues and add to the mix.

The scoop
This will be Scott Hunter's second season leading the Mariners' Draft as their director of amateur scouting. The Mariners tabbed college pitchers with six of their first 10 picks last year and could follow a similar patch this time, particularly after trading youngsters like Nick Neidert, Andrew Moore, Luiz Gohara and Ryan Yarbrough in the past two years.

First-round buzz
Callis projected the Mariners to take left-handed pitcher Ryan Rolison from Mississippi with their first-round selection in his latest mock draft. Callis agrees that the Mariners are targeting college pitchers, with Stetson right-hander Logan Gilbert, Florida right-hander Jackson Kowar and South Florida left-hander Shane McClanahan also possible. If the Mariners opt for a college hitters, Oregon State outfielder Trevor Larnach is a possibility.

Money matters
Under the Collective Bargaining Agreement, each team has an allotted bonus pool equal to the sum of the values of that club's selections in the first 10 rounds of the Draft. The more picks a team has, and the earlier it picks, the larger the pool. The signing bonuses for a team's selections in the first 10 rounds, plus any bonus greater than $125,000 for a player taken after the 10th round, will apply toward the bonus-pool total.

Any team going up to 5 percent over its allotted pool will be taxed at a 75 percent rate on the overage. A team that overspends by 5-10 percent gets a 75 percent tax plus the loss of a first-round pick. A team that goes 10-15 percent over its pool amount will be hit with a 100-percent penalty on the overage and the loss of a first- and second-round pick. Any overage of 15 percent or more gets a 100 percent tax plus the loss of first-round picks in the next two Drafts.

This year, the Mariners have a pool of $7,555,200 to spend in the first 10 rounds, including $3,883,800 to spend on their first selection.

Shopping list
The common theme of "best available athlete" rings truer than ever for the Mariners, with Dipoto looking to build up a farm system that he used heavily to acquire more advanced Major League-ready players the past two years. Pitching tops the list, but Seattle will look to add catching depth and could use young help in the pipeline across the infield as well.

Trend watch
During Dipoto's first two Drafts for Seattle, the Mariners took nine college players in the top 10, but used the second-round to tab a promising prep prospect and saved money elsewhere to sign those players above their slot value. Last year it was pitcher Sam Carlson out of Minnesota after tabbing third baseman Joe Rizzo in 2016. Carlson is Seattle's No. 3 prospect, though he's dealt with arm issues since being selected. Rizzo is playing third base for Advanced-A Modesto as a 20-year-old.

RECENT DRAFT HISTORY

Rising fast
Two relievers drafted last season by the Mariners are opening eyes already at Modesto in the Cal League. Wyatt Mills, a third-round pick out of Gonzaga, has already moved up to No. 10 on Seattle's prospect list, per MLB P