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Source: Miami interested in Cuban OF Martinez

MLB.com

MIAMI -- As part of their organizational makeover, the Marlins are placing a greater emphasis and more resources into signing international players. One of their early targets is Cuban-born outfielder Julio Pablo Martinez.

According to a source, MLB.com has confirmed Miami's interest in the 21-year-old left-handed power hitter, who held a private workout for the team on Thursday at the Roger Dean Stadium complex in Jupiter, Fla. Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill was in attendance at the workout, though the club has not commented on it.

MIAMI -- As part of their organizational makeover, the Marlins are placing a greater emphasis and more resources into signing international players. One of their early targets is Cuban-born outfielder Julio Pablo Martinez.

According to a source, MLB.com has confirmed Miami's interest in the 21-year-old left-handed power hitter, who held a private workout for the team on Thursday at the Roger Dean Stadium complex in Jupiter, Fla. Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill was in attendance at the workout, though the club has not commented on it.

According to Baseball America, the Marlins, Yankees and Rangers are considered the three favorites for Martinez, who is also expected to have a private workout with the Yankees at their complex in Tampa, Fla.

The Marlins are going through a transitional phase on their international side. In recent months, Fernando Seguignol was named director of international operations, replacing Albert Gonzalez, who has joined the Royals after spending 12 years with Miami.

The Marlins would be looking to sign Martinez as part of the 2018-19 international signing period, which starts on July 2. That's when they get their new international pool figure.

Due to a couple of offseason trades, the Marlins are more limited in what they can currently spend on the international market, as they've already traded away $1.25 million in pool money.

In November, Miami dealt right-hander Michael King and $250,000 of pool money to the Yankees for left-hander Caleb Smith and first baseman/outfielder Garrett Cooper. A more hefty exchange came in December. The Marlins sent Dee Gordon and $1 million of international pool money to the Mariners for three prospects -- Nick Neidert, Chris Torres and Robert Dugger.

At the time, the Yankees and Mariners were making strong pushes for Shohei Ohtani, who eventually signed with the Angels.

Of the three favorites, the Rangers are better positioned -- pool wise -- to sign Martinez during the current international signing period, which runs through June 15.

Martinez defected from Cuba in November before establishing residency in Haiti. He's already petitioned MLB to become a free agent, and that formality is expected to happen before the current signing period ends.

Martinez is regarded as a first-round caliber talent who batted .333 with six home runs and 24 stolen bases in his final season playing in Cuba.

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins

Marlins sign 1B Rodriguez to Minors pact

MLB.com

MIAMI -- Jonathan Rodriguez, a power-hitting first baseman and outfielder, has signed a Minor League contract with an invitation to Spring Training. 

The 28-year-old played for Double-A Chattanooga in 2017, batting .309, which placed him second to Marlins prospect Braxton Lee for the Southern League batting title.

MIAMI -- Jonathan Rodriguez, a power-hitting first baseman and outfielder, has signed a Minor League contract with an invitation to Spring Training. 

The 28-year-old played for Double-A Chattanooga in 2017, batting .309, which placed him second to Marlins prospect Braxton Lee for the Southern League batting title.

Rodriguez is a power-hitting threat, belting 21 home runs in 119 games for Chattanooga. A native of Puerto Rico, he provides right-handed hitting depth, and will compete for a roster spot in Spring Training.

Rodriguez and Lee battled it out for the Southern League batting title in 2017. Both finished at .309, with Lee technically getting the edge by a percentage point in a race that went down to the final at-bat.

The two will now be in Spring Training competing for positions on the Marlins.

Lee was acquired last June from the Rays as part of the Adeiny Hechavarria trade, joining Double-A Jacksonville for the remainder of the season.

Lee is already on the 40-man roster, while Rodriguez will try to fight his way onto the Marlins' roster in Spring Training.

Listed at 6-foot-2, 250-pounds, Rodriguez was a 17th round Draft pick of the Cardinals in 2009.

In nine Minor League seasons, he has a career slash line of .273/.368/.450 with 119 home runs and 486 RBIs in 913 games.

In 2017, Rodriguez was in the Twins' system, and played 119 games at Double-A and five for Triple-A Rochester, adding one additional home run at that level. 

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins, Jonathan Rodriguez

Prospect Alcantara: 'New doors are opening'

Right-hander 'ready to compete' with Marlins at Spring Training
MLB.com

MIAMI -- Sandy Alcantara possesses a 100-mph fastball, and he has top-of-the-rotation starter potential. With all the makings of a future ace in place, it would be tempting for the Marlins to speed up the developmental clock for the 22-year-old.

They're not. They're going to let their No. 1 prospect progress at his own speed.

MIAMI -- Sandy Alcantara possesses a 100-mph fastball, and he has top-of-the-rotation starter potential. With all the makings of a future ace in place, it would be tempting for the Marlins to speed up the developmental clock for the 22-year-old.

They're not. They're going to let their No. 1 prospect progress at his own speed.

To further acclimate to the next level, Alacantara recently participated in MLB's Rookie Career Development Program.

Alcantara has had a taste of pitching in the big leagues, making eight relief appearances as a September callup for the Cardinals last year. A native of the Dominican Republic, Alcantara is welcoming the fresh start ahead of him with Miami.

"For me, I think it's a big opportunity, because new doors are opening to keep moving forward and to keep competing hard like I've always done," the right-hander said.

Alcantara was one of the centerpieces of the December trade that sent All-Star outfielder Marcell Ozuna to the Cardinals. In return, the Marlins also received outfielder Magneuris Sierra, right-hander Zac Gallen and lefty Daniel Castano. According to MLB Pipeline, Sierra is now the Marlins' No. 5 prospect and Gallen is No. 15.

Video: Michael Hill discusses trading for Sandy Alcantara

"I feel happy, because they've given me that responsibility to be there with them," Alcantara said. "I'm going to work hard and keep being humble. Also, for the guys coming in behind me, to help them to follow my advice and also follow in my footsteps."

Ability-wise, all the makings are there for the right-hander to be a standout. It's now a matter of experience and commanding his pitches.

Per Statcast™, Alcantara's four-seam fastball -- on 45 pitches tracked in the big leagues -- averaged 98.51 mph. The MLB average was 93.19 mph. His fastball spin rate average was 2,359.16 rpm, also roughly the league average (2,254.62 rpm).

In 8 1/3 big league innings, Alcantara had a 4.32 ERA, striking out 10 and walking six.

"All of these guys are considered prospects, because they haven't proven themselves at the Major League level yet," Marlins vice president of player development and scouting Gary Denbo said. "They all have things they need to work on. You can probably say that every one of the pitchers that we acquired need to work on their fastball command.

"They have to make sure they can locate fastballs where Major League hitters aren't going to be able to impact them. You can say the same thing about Sandy. That's our No. 1 objective with all of our pitchers, to make sure they have good command of their fastballs."

Alcantara had been with the Cardinals since 2014, and he's logged 369 Minor League innings. A year ago, he went 7-5 with a 4.31 ERA in 25 games (22 starts) at Double-A Springfield. In 125 1/3 innings, he struck out 106 and walked 54.

After being called up in September, Alcantara threw as many as two innings just once. But he gained valuable experience, working with All-Star catcher Yadier Molina and picking up advice from starters like Carlos Martinez.

"They helped me a lot to keep competing and just being there with them," Alcantara said. "I'm going to try to take the advice that guys like Carlos Martinez and Yadier Molina gave me to Spring Training, to be ready to compete for a spot at the Major League level with the Marlins."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins, Sandy Alcantara

Denbo high on Marlins' new pitching prospects

VP of player development and scouting praises Alcantara, Guzman, others acquired this offseason
MLB.com

MIAMI -- The major trades the Marlins made recently have brought some much-needed starting pitchers into the system.

Not all may be fixtures in the rotation in 2018, but several provide promising options for the foreseeable future, headlined by hard throwers Sandy Alcantara and Jorge Guzman.

MIAMI -- The major trades the Marlins made recently have brought some much-needed starting pitchers into the system.

Not all may be fixtures in the rotation in 2018, but several provide promising options for the foreseeable future, headlined by hard throwers Sandy Alcantara and Jorge Guzman.

According to MLBPipeline.com, Alcantara and Guzman are the Nos. 1 and 2 prospects in Miami's system. But they aren't the only candidates acquired from recent trades who might make an impact next year.

• Marlins' Top 30 prospects

"You can probably say that every one of the pitchers we acquired, they need to work on their fastball command to ensure they are able to locate fastballs where Major League hitters aren't able to impact them," Marlins vice president of player development and scouting Gary Denbo said Thursday in a conference call.

"You can say the same thing about Sandy. That's our No. 1 objective with all of our pitchers: To ensure they have good command of their fastball."

Alcantara was a centerpiece in the trade with the Cardinals for Marcell Ozuna. Miami landed four players in the deal, with three being pitchers. Alcantara and right-hander Zac Gallen are the two pitchers closest to being big league-ready. Gallen is ranked as Miami's No. 15 prospect.

• Recent trades reshape Marlins' system

Alcantara, 22, pitched 8 1/3 innings of relief for the Cardinals in '17, striking out 10 while walking six. The Marlins profile him as a top-of-the-rotation candidate. Statcast™ had his four-seam fastball average at 98.5 mph.

Video: Michael Hill discusses trading for Sandy Alcantara

As promising as Alcantara is, he may not be the closest to sticking in the big leagues immediately. Gallen, 22, is making strides to reach the Majors in the near future.

"We think Zac is going to help us in the rotation," Denbo said. "We like his delivery. He's got all the tools of a future starting pitcher in the Major Leagues. His velocity is plus. Four-pitch mix. He's got three above-average pitches. He's shown pitchability, which means he's been able to locate his fastball effectively."

The pitcher with the most dominant stuff is Guzman. Acquired in the Stanton trade, his fastball averages 99 mph, and has topped at 103 mph. But at age 21 with no experience above Class A Short-Season in the New York-Penn League, Guzman needs more development.

"I guess the sky's the limit for Jorge Guzman," Denbo said. "Jorge has a power arm. Our director of player personnel, Dan Greenlee, will tell you that there is no other starter in baseball that has an average fastball as high as Jorge Guzman. Not only this year, but I think as far back as they've been measuring it."

Guzman just lacks the innings, logging 66 2/3 in 2017. With overpowering stuff, he struck out 88 and walked just 18.

Video: Callis on Marlins acquiring Guzman's electric arm

"It's obvious he has a great arm," Denbo said. "He has the ability to strike out hitters, which we value. He has the ability to throw strikes, and he's a good athlete. The athleticism should allow him make adjustments as needed as he advances through our system. We're extremely excited about Jorge Guzman, adding an arm like that into the organization."

A lefty with a chance to be in the rotation out of Spring Training is Caleb Smith, acquired from the Yankees in a Minor League trade.

"He's a starter who had great success in Triple-A with the Yankees last year," Denbo said. "We think he's going to be able to compete for the starting rotation here."

Smith, 29th on Miami's prospect list, appeared in nine games with two starts for the Yankees, throwing 18 1/3 innings. He struck out 18 and walked 10. The lefty was 9-1 with a 2.39 ERA at Triple-A.

Nick Neidert, Miami's No. 7 prospect, was part of the Dee Gordon deal with Seattle. The right-hander turned 21 on Nov. 20, and he made the jump to Double-A last season.

"We believe he will have a chance in the future to join our starting rotation," Denbo said. "He's only 21 years old."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins, Sandy Alcantara, Zac Gallen, Jorge Guzman, Nick Neidert, Caleb Smith

Prospect Neidert excited to be part of rebuild

Right-hander acquired in Gordon trade joins system of young arms
MLB.com

MIAMI -- A fixture in the Modesto Nuts rotation for much of the 2017 season, right-hander Nick Neidert was a rooting fan of the club when it won the Class A Advanced California League championship in September.

At the time his former teammates were celebrating, Neidert had already been promoted to Double-A Arkansas in the Mariners' system. His career path changed yet again on Dec. 7, when he was dealt to the Marlins as part of the Dee Gordon trade.

MIAMI -- A fixture in the Modesto Nuts rotation for much of the 2017 season, right-hander Nick Neidert was a rooting fan of the club when it won the Class A Advanced California League championship in September.

At the time his former teammates were celebrating, Neidert had already been promoted to Double-A Arkansas in the Mariners' system. His career path changed yet again on Dec. 7, when he was dealt to the Marlins as part of the Dee Gordon trade.

The Lawrenceville, Ga., resident is one of the prominent young pitching prospects the Marlins have added through recent trades. He comes from a winning culture, and joins a growing list of high-ceiling players.

Denbo high on Marlins' new pitching prospects

"He's another starting pitcher candidate for us," Marlins vice president of player development and scouting Gary Denbo said. "We believe he will have a chance in the future to join our starting rotation. He's only 21 years old."

A second-round Draft pick of the Mariners in 2015, Neidert went 10-3 with a 2.76 ERA in 19 starts at Modesto. At Double-A, things didn't go as smoothly for the right-hander, as he was 1-3 with a 6.56 ERA in 23 1/3 innings.

"I got roughed up a little bit when I got to Double-A, but at the same time, I definitely learned a lot from those guys there, and from pitching," Neidert said in an interview with MLB.com. "I think it definitely helped me this offseason to prepare for the upcoming season to be even better than I was this past year."

With a fastball, changeup slider mix, Neidert made his biggest impact at Modesto, reflected by his impressive credentials. He struck out 122 and walked just 22 in 127 2/3 innings in 2017.

"I didn't get to go to play with them in the playoffs, but I definitely kept track with them, every single game they'd play," Neidert said. "I'd sit at home listening to every single game that they played -- sharing, yelling, just as if I were at the ballfield. I knew those guys had it. The coaching was outstanding, the players had a lot of heart. It was awesome to see that they won it. I called them and congratulated everyone."

Video: Neidert named Mariners' Pipeline Pitcher of the Year

The Marlins are restocking their system in hopes of creating a strong foundation from the ground up.

According to MLBPipeline.com, Neidert is Miami's No. 7 prospect. In the Gordon trade, the Marlins also acquired infielder Christopher Torres, ranked 14th, and right-hander Robert Dugger.

Spring Training will determine where Neidert starts off, which likely will be either at Double-A Jacksonville or Triple-A New Orleans. He could win a rotation spot for the Marlins in camp, but with just 254 career Minor League innings, coupled with the fact he turned 21 on Nov. 20, there's no urgency to rush his development.

"He has the ability to command his fastball," Denbo said. "His changeup is plus. We like the movement he has on the fastball because it's different than what you normally see. He's got deception, which makes it very difficult for batters to pick up the ball, and he's a good athlete. There's a lot of qualities there that make us believe he will help us in our starting rotation in Miami."

Neidert may be new to the Marlins, but he will see plenty of familiar faces when Spring Training gets underway in mid-February.

In July, the Marlins swung a deal with Seattle for reliever David Phelps. In return, they added outfielder Brayan Hernandez (No. 12-ranked prospect), and right-handers Brandon Miller (25th), Pablo Lopez (27th) and Lukas Schiraldi.

"Every single guy that's been traded over there, I have their number," Neidert said. "I texted them and said, 'Hey, it looks like we're going to be teammates again.' It's exciting to reconnect with those guys. At least I know a couple of people when I go into Spring Training. Yeah, I'm excited to see them again.

"There's definitely a lot of good, young pitching in this organization. It's going to be fun to get to know them and kind of pick each other's brains, and learn from each other. The Marlins have a very bright future, if you look at the entire farm system. They have all the talent in the world. It's going to be exciting to see what that team can do."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins, Nick Neidert

Podcast: Marlins' Denbo knows Yanks' farm

MLB.com

The following is an excerpt from this week's Pipeline Podcast, in which Jim Callis and Jonathan Mayo talk to Tim McMaster about the Marlins' return for slugger Giancarlo Stanton, Gary Denbo's knowledge of the Yankees' farm system, the news regarding Shohei Ohtani's elbow and more. To listen to the show in its entirety, go to the MLB Pipeline Podcast page.

Callis: [Jorge] Guzman does have a significant amount of upside. He hasn't pitched in full-season ball, which is why he's not on the Top 100 Prospects list. He has a Top 100-type arm. He's one of the hardest-throwing starters in the Minor Leagues. Up 97 to 103 consistently. It's Michael Kopech-type velocity. We need to get the Minor League Statcast™ data and we can actually find out who has the best fastball among Minor League starters.

The following is an excerpt from this week's Pipeline Podcast, in which Jim Callis and Jonathan Mayo talk to Tim McMaster about the Marlins' return for slugger Giancarlo Stanton, Gary Denbo's knowledge of the Yankees' farm system, the news regarding Shohei Ohtani's elbow and more. To listen to the show in its entirety, go to the MLB Pipeline Podcast page.

Callis: [Jorge] Guzman does have a significant amount of upside. He hasn't pitched in full-season ball, which is why he's not on the Top 100 Prospects list. He has a Top 100-type arm. He's one of the hardest-throwing starters in the Minor Leagues. Up 97 to 103 consistently. It's Michael Kopech-type velocity. We need to get the Minor League Statcast™ data and we can actually find out who has the best fastball among Minor League starters.

The interesting thing to me is he was traded last year, too. He was in the Brian McCann trade along with Albert Abreu, who's another very good prospect in the Yankees system. When he came over, everybody knew he had a live arm, but he was very wild and didn't throw strikes. Well he went to the New York-Penn League this year, and he threw a lot of strikes. So I think there's still some question with the delivery, is he a starter or reliever long term. But he was more polished than advertised this year. There is a lot of risk when you're talking about a pitcher who hasn't gotten to full-season ball yet, but from an upside standpoint, the arm, as you mentioned, is as electric as just about any starter's in the Minor Leagues.

McMaster: If he does end up as a reliever, it's closer stuff, right?

Mayo: As long as he's got a second pitch that is at least average, hopefully better than average, you still have to throw enough strikes in the bullpen. I know we often get caught, especially when we write all those blurbs up, "Well if the command doesn't come, you can put him in the bullpen." We've seen plenty of guys who throw 100 who don't make it up because they can't find the strike zone consistently enough. I think based on what we saw in the New York-Penn League, he'll at least be able to do that. If I'm the Marlins, I give him every opportunity to continue to start, just like the Red Sox and now White Sox have done with Michael Kopech.

Video: Callis discusses Marlins' return in Stanton trade

Callis: I will say from the Marlins' perspective, they brought in Gary Denbo, who was the Yankees' farm director. He basically oversees scouting and player development. So Gary Denbo knows the Yankees' farm system, you could argue probably as well or better than anyone in the Yankees' organization right now because he ran the farm department for so long. So they didn't get as much as I thought they should've gotten for Giancarlo Stanton because they undercut their leverage by telling everybody that they had to trade him, and I don't think they handled it great.

But that said, they had a guy with Gary Denbo who knew which guys to ask for. I know it didn't go down like this, but it's almost like the result was Brian Cashman said, "OK, we'll take him. But you can have anybody on our Top 30 list, but you can't have a guy in the Top 100. And you can have another prospect, but somebody off our Top 30 list." And I know that's not how it went down, but that's how it worked out theoretically. But given those parameters, Gary Denbo would know which guys to pick. And so they didn't get one of their very best prospects, but of the guys who weren't the biggest-name prospects, they got one of the best guys. And of the guys who weren't on the Top 30 and maybe you were -- I don't know if you call them sleepers or guys that are further away -- Gary Denbo knew all those guys. I think whatever list of players were made available to the Marlins, you have the guy there you'd want telling you which guys to pick.

 

Miami Marlins

Recent trades reshape Miami's farm system

MLB.com

MIAMI -- Trading Dee Gordon, Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna in a span of a week made the Marlins one of the focal points at the Winter Meetings, and it also dramatically reshaped the organization's top 30 rankings, according to MLBPipeline.com.

The three deals brought in 10 players, including projected starting second baseman Starlin Castro, plus three of Miami's top five prospects, including right-hander Sandy Alcantara (No. 1).

MIAMI -- Trading Dee Gordon, Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna in a span of a week made the Marlins one of the focal points at the Winter Meetings, and it also dramatically reshaped the organization's top 30 rankings, according to MLBPipeline.com.

The three deals brought in 10 players, including projected starting second baseman Starlin Castro, plus three of Miami's top five prospects, including right-hander Sandy Alcantara (No. 1).

Going back even further and looking at the overall picture, the Marlins' wheeling and dealing started on June 26 when slick-fielding shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria was traded to the Rays. It marked the first of seven trades that have netted the organization 20 players, with 12 in the top 30 prospect rankings.

"The front-liners in a majority of those deals have been starting pitchers," Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill said.

Video: Michael Hill discusses trading for Sandy Alcantara

After finishing 77-85, the organization made it clear sweeping changes were necessary to infuse talent into all levels of the system. Chief executive officer Derek Jeter has repeatedly stated each move is strategic in an attempt to build a sturdy foundation from the bottom up.

That's why in the Ozuna trade to the Cardinals, which was announced on Thursday, Daniel Castano was included. The left-hander projects to open at the Class A level, while Alcantara is a candidate to be in the Opening Day rotation.

"Pitching will be a focus," Hill said. "It was obviously an area where we were a little short. But, I always speak that you can never have enough depth across the board."

Video: Mayo on Marlins' prospect haul in Ozuna trade

In MLBPipeline.com's new rankings, five of Miami's top 10 prospects came in trades going back to July: Alcantara, right-hander Jorge Guzman (No. 2), outfielder Magneuris Sierra (No. 5), right-hander Nick Neidert (No. 7) and right-hander Merandy Gonzalez (No. 10).

Video: Callis on Marlins acquiring Guzman's electric arm

Others in the top 30 are outfielder Brayan Hernandez (12th), infielder Christopher Torres (14th), right-hander Zac Gallen (15th), right-hander Brandon Miller (25th), right-hander Pablo Lopez (27th), outfielder Ricardo Cespedes (28th) and lefty reliever Caleb Smith (29th).

The trading started with Hechavarria going to the Rays in late June and Miami bringing in outfielder Braxton Lee, who could be a fourth outfielder in 2018, as well as right-hander Evan Clark.

Video: Prospect Braxton Lee discusses his two-hit game

The Marlins dealt reliever David Phelps to the Mariners on July 20 for Hernandez, Miller, Lopez and right-hander Lukas Schiraldi.

The Marlins sent closer AJ Ramos to the Mets on July 28 for Gonzalez and Cespedes.

"Going back to our July trades, when our relievers were at their highest values, we felt like we took advantage and maximized the value for David Phelps and for AJ Ramos, and bringing quality pieces into our organization," Hill said. "I think that will be a theme when you think about how we manage our roster and try to make the most of our assets and give ourselves every opportunity to make smart decisions in our trades."

On Nov. 20, the Marlins completed a Minor League deal of right-hander Michael King, plus $250,000 of international signing pool bonus money to the Yankees for Smith and first baseman/outfielder Garrett Cooper.

Video: NYY@TOR: Cooper singles up the middle to plate a pair

The recent flurry of trades started on Dec. 7, with Gordon and $1 million in international pool money going to Seattle for Neidert, Torres and right-hander Robert Dugger.

The Stanton trade was announced on Monday at the Winter Meetings in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., with Miami adding Castro, Guzman and infielder Jose Devers.

For Ozuna, Miami acquired Alcantara, Sierra, Gallen and Castano. Sierra will compete for an Opening Day spot, and he is a future leadoff candidate. Gallen projects as a back-of-the-rotation-caliber starter.

Video: Michael Hill on Marlins acquiring Magneuris Sierra

"We tried to make the best trades that we can, given our trade partners and maximizing the value they have in their systems," Hill said. "We're trying to make smart deals to allow us to continue to add depth."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins, Sandy Alcantara, Merandy Gonzalez, Jorge Guzman, Nick Neidert, Magneuris Sierra

Fish feel they added impactful talent for Ozuna

Potential frontline starter Alcantara, center fielder Sierra among 4 prospects in trade
MLB.com

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- To make an impactful move that would reshape their system, the Marlins had to part ways with one of their most productive players. The tradeoff, the organization believes, is worth it.

On Thursday afternoon, the Marlins announced that All-Star left fielder Marcell Ozuna was headed to the Cardinals for four prospects, including three who were previously ranked in the top 13 of St. Louis' system, according to MLBPipeline.com.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- To make an impactful move that would reshape their system, the Marlins had to part ways with one of their most productive players. The tradeoff, the organization believes, is worth it.

On Thursday afternoon, the Marlins announced that All-Star left fielder Marcell Ozuna was headed to the Cardinals for four prospects, including three who were previously ranked in the top 13 of St. Louis' system, according to MLBPipeline.com.

Right-hander Sandy Alcantara, outfielder Magneuris Sierra, right-hander Zac Gallen and lefty Daniel Castano are headed to the Marlins.

Video: Hill on Marlins outlook going forward into 2018

The teams reached agreement on Wednesday, and on Thursday afternoon, the trade was announced a couple of hours after the Winter Meetings wrapped up.

The infusion of talent in this trade has dramatically altered the Marlins' Top 30 Prospects list, with Alcantara becoming the organization's No. 1, per MLBPipeline.com. Sierra ranks fifth and Gallen is 15th.

"As we talked in our room in Orlando, we spoke of impact," Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill said. "We talked about championship-caliber talent and making that a priority as we look to make all of our deals.

"As we go through this [building process], the goal is to add championship-caliber talent to this organization that's going to put us in position to win a championship. You do that with elite talent, upper-echelon talent."

Video: Mayo on Marlins' prospect haul in Ozuna trade

Alcantara, 22, has a fastball that touches 100 mph, and he made eight relief appearances for the Cardinals in 2017, posting a 4.32 ERA with 10 strikeouts and six walks in 8 1/3 innings.

According to Statcast™, his four-seam fastball -- based on 45 total pitches -- averaged 98.51 mph. The MLB average for the pitch was 93.19 mph.

Sierra, 21, saw action in 22 big league games for St. Louis, batting .317 with a .359 on-base percentage. A speedster, Sierra projects to play center field and bat leadoff.

Video: Michael Hill on Marlins acquiring Magneuris Sierra

Alcantara and Sierra will compete in Spring Training for Opening Day roster spots. However, the Marlins will not rush their development as they are part of a bigger picture -- to be part of the organization's future.

Ozuna, 27, is two years away from free agency, and he was projected to make just under $11 million in arbitration, according to MLBTradeRumors.com. A two-time All-Star, Ozuna is coming off a career year, batting .312 with 37 home runs and 124 RBIs.

"There's no question that Marcell Ozuna is a tremendous talent," Hill said. "You look at the return we were able to get for him, you see how talented he was.

"As we started our offseason, the goal is a consistent one, we need to improve our overall talent, improve our depth. When you think about Marcell, a four-plus [year] Major League service outfielder, two years away from free agency, we just felt this was an opportunity to maximize our return."

Hot Stove Tracker

The Marlins have made three major trades in a week, starting with Dee Gordon going to the Mariners on Dec. 7, followed by reigning National League MVP Award winner Giancarlo Stanton being dealt to the Yankees on Monday for Starlin Castro, Jorge Guzman and Jose Devers.

Video: Callis on Marlins acquiring Guzman's electric arm

After moving roughly $340 million off their books, the Marlins have no urgency to trade any more core players from the '17 roster. There are rumblings that outfielder Christian Yelich does not want to go through a rebuild, and there's speculation he could be traded.

"Christian Yelich is a three-plus [year] Major League service outfielder for the Marlins under control for the next five years," Hill said. "I'm extremely excited that he's part of our organization."

Hill added he likely will soon touch base with Yelich.

Castro projects to replace Gordon at second, and Guzman is another hard-thrower with top-of-the-rotation potential. Like Alcantara, Guzman's fastball reaches 100 mph.

Guzman is ranked second on the revised Marlins Top 30.

"The starters we brought back [from the Cardinals and Yankees], we feel as they continue to develop and they reach their potential, these are pieces that can lead a rotation," Hill said. "Mid-to-upper 90-mph fastballs are just the start of it."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins

Marlins' Rule 5 Draft picks to get shot at rotation

Miami selects right-handers Hernandez, Graves in Major League phase
MLB.com

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- The Marlins struck Rule 5 Draft gold at the Winter Meetings in 2005, when they selected Dan Uggla off the D-backs' roster. At the time, the franchise was going through a restructuring period, and Uggla eventually developed into an All-Star second baseman.

Did Miami uncover another Rule 5 Draft gem on Thursday? The organization certainly hopes so, with the selections of two right-handed pitchers -- Elieser Hernandez and Brett Graves -- in the Major League phase of the Draft. The Marlins' 40-man roster is now full.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- The Marlins struck Rule 5 Draft gold at the Winter Meetings in 2005, when they selected Dan Uggla off the D-backs' roster. At the time, the franchise was going through a restructuring period, and Uggla eventually developed into an All-Star second baseman.

Did Miami uncover another Rule 5 Draft gem on Thursday? The organization certainly hopes so, with the selections of two right-handed pitchers -- Elieser Hernandez and Brett Graves -- in the Major League phase of the Draft. The Marlins' 40-man roster is now full.

2017 Rule 5 Draft results

The picks, which come at a cost of $100,000 per player, were not merely formalities. Miami plans to give both a legitimate shot at winning a rotation spot during Spring Training.

:: Rule 5 Draft coverage ::

"Both selections are starting pitchers," president of baseball operations Michael Hill said. "We're going to give them an opportunity to start and compete."

The Marlins also selected catchers B.J. Lopez from the D-backs and Sharif Othman from the Yankees, plus first baseman Will Allen III from the Tigers and right-hander Brandon Barker from the Orioles, in the Triple-A phase, with a price tag of $24,000 on each pick.

Miami lost right-hander Tyler Kinley to the Twins in the Major League phase.

Dealing with Rule 5 Draft picks is always tricky, because players selected in the Major League phase must make the Opening Day roster and stay on the active roster the entire season. They can't be optioned to the Minor Leagues for any additional development or if there are other roster-related issues.

But with the Marlins redirecting, there will be more organizational patience. If either or both Major League phase picks shows promise, they could break camp with the big league squad. If not, they must be offered back to their original club.

"As I said, we will look to acquire talent and build depth in our organization through every means," Hill said. "The Rule 5 Draft is an opportunity where you can access players you don't normally have the ability to access and give an opportunity. Pitching and building pitching depth is something that is always at the forefront for us, and adding as much as we possibly can."

Hernandez was selected off the Astros' roster. The 22-year-old from Venezuela combined for a 5-5 record with a 3.68 ERA and 88 strikeouts in 73 1/3 innings between Rookie-level and Class A Advanced in 2017.

"We saw him late, and he finished strong," Hill said. "Three-pitch mix, very composed, clean delivery. We like his ability to maintain his delivery and repeat and throw strikes."

Graves, 24, was taken in the second round of the Major League phase. He went 1-1 with a 4.47 ERA and 57 strikeouts in 56 1/3 innings between Class A Advanced and Double-A last season.

"If you look at him, year over year over year, the spin rate on his curveball ranks among the highest in Minor League Baseball," Hill said. "He got better from '15 to '16, made a big jump. From '16 to '17, he made even a greater jump, well-above-average curveball. We think it's an out pitch."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins

Marlins ready to go all in on building plan

With Stanton deal on heels of Gordon trade, Ozuna may be next piece moved
MLB.com

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- With the trade sending National League MVP Award winner Giancarlo Stanton to the Yankees announced on Monday, the Marlins are now positioned to go full steam ahead into their plan to build their organization from the bottom up.

The restructuring comes at a hefty price, as Miami parts with one of the most popular and productive players in franchise history. Stanton waived his no-trade clause to join New York.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- With the trade sending National League MVP Award winner Giancarlo Stanton to the Yankees announced on Monday, the Marlins are now positioned to go full steam ahead into their plan to build their organization from the bottom up.

The restructuring comes at a hefty price, as Miami parts with one of the most popular and productive players in franchise history. Stanton waived his no-trade clause to join New York.

The Marlins will receive second baseman Starlin Castro, Minor League right-hander Jorge Guzman, ranked by MLBPipeline.com as New York's No. 9 prospect, and infielder Jose Devers in return for the slugger. 

Stanton is the second major player traded by the Marlins leading into the Winter Meetings. Two-time All-Star second baseman Dee Gordon was dealt to the Mariners on Thursday for three prospects -- right-handers Nick Neidert and Robert Dugger and infielder Christopher Torres.

Seattle is picking up the remaining $38 million owed to Gordon over the next three seasons, while the Yankees will assume all but $30 million of the $295 million owed to Stanton over the next 10 years (assuming Stanton does not opt out following the 2020 season).

After Gordon was traded on Thursday, Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill touched on the club's offseason objective.

Video: Return for Gordon includes pair of hurlers, shortstop

"We know where we're at, we need to get better," Hill said. "We need to add depth. We need to do things to give us an opportunity to build an organization that we feel can win consistently."

The Marlins have endured eight straight losing seasons, finishing 77-85 and 20 games behind the Nationals in the NL East in 2017, and 10 games off the pace for the second Wild Card spot.

Miami opened this past season with a payroll of $115 million, the highest in franchise history. Despite having a strong core of position players, the Marlins lacked pitching and organizational depth, prompting new ownership to move the team in another direction -- with payroll targeted for below $100 million.

By trading Stanton and Gordon, the Marlins have already done plenty of their heavy lifting before the Winter Meetings.

Still, more moves could follow -- and All-Star left fielder Marcell Ozuna moves to the top of the list.

The two players least likely to be dealt are center fielder Christian Yelich and catcher J.T. Realmuto. Miami might listen to offers for right-hander Dan Straily, who is in arbitration -- but it would have to be an offer that overwhelmed the club to be completed.

Arbitration-eligible for two more seasons, Ozuna's salary projection, according to MLB Trade Rumors, is just under $11 million.

The Cardinals offer a potential match for the 27-year-old, who batted .312 with 37 home runs and 124 RBIs in 2017. Miami just spent weeks in discussions with St. Louis regarding Stanton, and Ozuna would also fit its need for a power-hitting outfielder.

Video: ATL@MIA: Ozuna slugs 37th homer, dances with Gordon

St. Louis had the framework of a deal in place with Miami for Stanton, but he declined to waive his no-trade clause.

Hot Stove Tracker

In talks regarding Stanton, the Marlins had interest in Cardinals right-handers Jack Flaherty, Dakota Hudson and Sandy Alcantara, ranked third, eighth and ninth, respectively, on St. Louis' Top 30 prospects list, according to MLBPipeline.com. Any of them could be part of a possible package for Ozuna.

The Marlins also completed a Minor League trade with the Yankees this offseason, acquiring left-hander Caleb Smith and first baseman Garrett Cooper for right-hander Michael King and $250,000 of international bonus pool money.

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins, Marcell Ozuna

Marlins deal Gordon to Seattle for 3 prospects

Seattle also lands $1M in international slot money in trade for steals leader, who will play center
MLB.com

SEATTLE -- Looking to improve their team speed and baserunning ability, the Mariners made a bold move in that direction on Thursday as general manager Jerry Dipoto acquired two-time National League All-Star Dee Gordon from the Marlins and another $1 million in international slot money in exchange for top pitching prospect Nick Neidert and two other Minor Leaguers. Seattle plans to play Gordon, a National League Gold Glove Award-winning second baseman, in center field.

Neidert, 21, was the Mariners' No. 2 prospect per MLBPipeline.com. Infielder Chris Torres, their No. 7 prospect, and right-hander Robert Dugger are also headed to Miami.

SEATTLE -- Looking to improve their team speed and baserunning ability, the Mariners made a bold move in that direction on Thursday as general manager Jerry Dipoto acquired two-time National League All-Star Dee Gordon from the Marlins and another $1 million in international slot money in exchange for top pitching prospect Nick Neidert and two other Minor Leaguers. Seattle plans to play Gordon, a National League Gold Glove Award-winning second baseman, in center field.

Neidert, 21, was the Mariners' No. 2 prospect per MLBPipeline.com. Infielder Chris Torres, their No. 7 prospect, and right-hander Robert Dugger are also headed to Miami.

The additional international slot money was designed to help Seattle's pursuit of Japanese two-way star Shohei Ohtani, though he wound up signing with the Angels on Friday.

But even without Ohtani, Gordon brings a speed element that Dipoto has been seeking.

Video: Gordon improves Mariners' lineup, adds athleticism

"We want to be more athletic, we want to be faster and more dynamic on the bases," Dipoto said. "Very few players on the planet are more dynamic on the bases than Dee Gordon."

Gordon broke in with the Dodgers as a shortstop and played there his first three seasons, but switched to second base in 2014. He has started just two games at shortstop in the past four years. He played 13 games in the outfield for Licey in the Dominican Winter League in 2013-14, and nine of those were in center.

That is the extent of Gordon's professional outfield experience, but a switch from the middle of the infield to center field is not unheard of, especially for players with elite speed. In recent years, both Billy Hamilton and Trea Turner -- who were primarily shortstops in the Minors -- moved to center in the Majors, though Turner has since moved back to shortstop because of the Nationals' roster construction.

Video: Dee Gordon to play center field for the Mariners

Gordon acknowledged he was "shocked" to find out he will be moved to center field, but said he understands the move and will do what's best for the team. He said he's excited to hit in front of Robinson Cano and Nelson Cruz, and he has huge respect for Cano's abilities at second base.

"I'm not going to lie," Gordon said. "I worked really hard to be one of the best second basemen in baseball. But if it's anybody I'd move for, it's Robbie. To hit in front of those guys is a dream. I know they're going to get their numbers, so I just don't want to mess it up."

Both Dipoto and Gordon said they expect the transition to go smoothly.

"Just the little bit I had in the Dominican," Gordon said of his previous experience in the outfield. "Honestly I played that pretty well, just winging it. Hopefully with some Major League-caliber coaching, I'll be fine. I consider myself a fast learner and I want to help this team win."

Video: Dee Gordon talks transitioning to center field

The Mariners put a big emphasis on defense in 2017, acquiring Jarrod Dyson and Mitch Haniger after finishing 21st in the Majors with -8 Outs Above Average (OAA) the year before. With added outfield range in 2017, they jumped to fifth in the Majors with +12 OAA. Giving significant playing time to someone who has never played center in the Majors before could put a dent in that improvement.

Though overshadowed by the talk involving National League MVP teammate Giancarlo Stanton, Gordon has been the subject of trade rumors this offseason as the Marlins look to shed payroll.

Tweet from @uninterrupted: ���Seattle, let���s get it.��� @FlashGJr, centerfielder for the @Mariners. pic.twitter.com/P13AKwKDwk

Gordon is under contract for three more seasons for a combined $37.9 million, with $10.8 million this coming year and then $13.3 million in '19 and $13.8 million in '20. He also has a $14 million team option for 2021 that becomes guaranteed if he accumulates 600 plate appearances in 2020 or 1,200 plate appearances in 2019-20.

Gordon certainly replaces the speed element lost by the Mariners when Dyson became a free agent, and he is a much bigger offensive threat, having posted a .308/.341/.375 slash line with 60 stolen bases and a 3.1 bWAR last season.

The Mariners finished 2017 with three rookie outfielders in Haniger, Ben Gamel and Guillermo Heredia. With Heredia rehabbing from shoulder surgery this offseason, Gordon slides into the center-field role and allows Gamel and Heredia to split time in left field, with Haniger handling right field.

Tweet from @_dadler: Some #Statcast™ on @Mariners' Dee Gordon:29.7 ft/s avg sprint speed in 2017. 4th in MLB, fastest IF (30+ is elite)119 sub-4 home-to-1st times, most in MLB. Next-most: Billy Hamilton with 65Best home-to-1st: 3.49 sec, 6th-fastest of 2017MLB-best 101 ground-ball hits

Gordon has led the Majors in stolen bases three of the last four seasons, with a career-high 64 in his last year with the Dodgers in 2014, 58 in his first season with the Marlins in '15, and then last season when he was 60-for-76 in stolen-base attempts for Miami.

The only time Gordon didn't lead the league in stolen bases during that span was 2016, when he served an 80-game suspension for a failed drug test and played just 79 games, batting .268 with 30 stolen bases.

Video: Must C Classic: Gordon reaches 60 steals, 200 hits

The Florida native owns a career .293/.329/.367 line in seven seasons. He led the Majors in hits with 205 in 2015 for the Marlins while winning the NL batting title at a career-best .333. Gordon also was the NL Gold Glove winner and Silver Slugger Award winner at second base that season while earning his second straight All-Star berth.

The trade is the fifth engineered by the always-busy Dipoto this offseason, and the 62nd trade in the 27 months since he took over as Seattle's GM. Last month he acquired 25-year-old slugger Ryon Healy from the A's to fill a hole at first base, sent hard-throwing prospect Thyago Vieira to the White Sox for $500,000 in international slot money to bolster the team's bid for Ohtani, and landed reliever Nick Rumbelow from the Yankees for a pair of Minor Leaguers.

Video: MLB Tonight: Mariners add Dee, more slot money

Dipoto also acquired another $1 million in international slot money on Wednesday from the Twins in exchange for Minor League catcher David Banuelos, who was the team's No. 10 prospect.

Teams can only add up to 75 percent of their initial pool money, which in the Mariners' case means they're limited to a total of $4.37 million if they want to make any further trades.

Video: Zinkie discusses Gordon's fantasy value after trade

Fantasy spin | Fred Zinkie (@FredZinkieMLB)
Moving to a contending Mariners club will likely be a boon for Gordon, who should be selected during the initial three rounds of '18 roto drafts after hitting .308 with 114 runs scored and a Major League-best 60 steals this past year. Operating in an American League lineup for the first time and batting in front of players such as Cano and Cruz, the speedster could flirt with the 100-run plateau again while posting a career-high RBI total.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

 

Seattle Mariners, Miami Marlins, Dee Gordon

Marlins get 3 Mariners prospects for Gordon

Miami sends All-Star 2B, international pool money to Seattle
MLB.com

MIAMI -- Dee Gordon, the Marlins' speedy leadoff batter who paced the Majors with 60 stolen bases this year, on Thursday became the first significant trade made by the organization's new ownership.

A two-time All-Star second baseman, Gordon was dealt to the Mariners for Minor League right-handers Nick Neidert and Robert Dugger and infielder Christopher Torres. The Marlins also included international bonus pool money, which MLB.com confirmed to be $1 million, in the trade.

MIAMI -- Dee Gordon, the Marlins' speedy leadoff batter who paced the Majors with 60 stolen bases this year, on Thursday became the first significant trade made by the organization's new ownership.

A two-time All-Star second baseman, Gordon was dealt to the Mariners for Minor League right-handers Nick Neidert and Robert Dugger and infielder Christopher Torres. The Marlins also included international bonus pool money, which MLB.com confirmed to be $1 million, in the trade.

Hot Stove Tracker

Under the ownership team led by Bruce Sherman and Derek Jeter, the Marlins are reshaping the organization, seeking to build a strong foundation from the bottom up. Miami was 77-85 and hasn't had a winning season since 2009, and significant changes are expected to continue.

Video: Marlins trade Gordon to begin process of rebuild

Neidert, a promising 20-year-old who advanced to Double-A, was ranked as Seattle's No. 2 prospect by MLBPipeline.com. Torres, who switch-hits, was rated seventh.

"We know where we're at; we need to get better," Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill said. "We need to add depth. We need to do things to give us an opportunity to build an organization we feel can win consistently. In this deal, we took a very good player, an All-Star-caliber player, in Dee Gordon and were able to add three very talented pieces to our Minor League system."

Video: Neidert named Mariners' Pipeline Pitcher of the Year

A National League Gold Glove finalist at second base this year and a Gold Glove winner in 2015, Gordon is expected to play center field in Seattle. The Mariners have All-Star Robinson Cano at second base.

Gordon batted .308 and collected 201 hits, while establishing a career-high 114 runs.

In 2015, Gordon's first season with the Marlins, he was the NL batting champ with a .333 average. But in 2016, Gordon was suspended for 80 games for being in violation of MLB's drug policy.

Gordon bounced back with a big year in 2017, being the table-setter at the top of the order. Giancarlo Stanton, the NL MVP who led the Majors with 59 home runs, batted behind Gordon for most of the season.

As the Gordon trade was consummated, the Marlins still are working on trade scenarios for Stanton.

Gordon had drawn interest from several clubs, including the Blue Jays, but the match ended up being Seattle.

"This offseason has been an interesting one," Hill said. "There's obviously been a lot of conversations on a lot of our players. Dee is a talented player. We know what he can do offensively. We know what he can do defensively. It just worked out that we were able to find the right fit with Seattle."

The Mariners also are taking on the remaining $38 million on the five-year deal Gordon signed after the 2015 season.

Video: Gordon trade creates opening at second base for Fish

Miami now has no clear-cut second baseman, but Derek Dietrich and Miguel Rojas could be options.

"We have options we'll look at in Spring Training," Hill said. "Obviously, we still have a long offseason ahead of us. So I think that will take shape as the offseason progresses. But if we were starting today, we have internal options who play and can play second base for us."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins, Robert Dugger, Dee Gordon, Nick Neidert, Chris Torres

Outfielder Lee among 6 added to Miami roster

Marlins acquire lefty Smith, infielder Cooper from Yankees
MLB.com

MIAMI -- The Marlins made a series of moves, including a Minor League trade with the Yankees, that enabled them to fill all 40 of their roster spots before Monday's 8 p.m. ET deadline to set their squad.

From New York, Miami acquired left-hander Caleb Smith and infielder Garrett Cooper for right-hander Michael King and international bonus pool money. The Marlins also added outfielder Braxton Lee and right-handers Merandy Gonzalez, Pablo Lopez and James Needy to the roster.

MIAMI -- The Marlins made a series of moves, including a Minor League trade with the Yankees, that enabled them to fill all 40 of their roster spots before Monday's 8 p.m. ET deadline to set their squad.

From New York, Miami acquired left-hander Caleb Smith and infielder Garrett Cooper for right-hander Michael King and international bonus pool money. The Marlins also added outfielder Braxton Lee and right-handers Merandy Gonzalez, Pablo Lopez and James Needy to the roster.

By protecting all six on the 40-man roster, the Marlins ensured they will not be eligible for the Rule 5 Draft in December.

The 26-year-old Smith spent a majority of the season at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, going 9-1 with a 2.39 ERA in 98 innings. He briefly pitched for the Yankees, tossing 18 2/3 innings and posting a 7.71 ERA.

Cooper, a 6-foot-6 first baseman, played in 13 games with the Yankees and batted .326 in 45 plate appearances.

Video: NYY@TOR: Cooper notches four hits, two RBIs

The Marlins had six roster spots available entering Monday.

Lee, 24, was acquired from the Rays as part of the Adeiny Hechavarria trade, and he played for Double-A Jacksonville. He finished with a .309 batting average, which was tied for the Southern League batting title. Since October, he has represented the Marlins at the Arizona Fall League.

A left-handed hitter who can play all three outfield spots, Lee is expected to compete for a roster spot for the Marlins in Spring Training. He could be a fit as a fourth outfielder.

The emergence of Lee is one reason the Marlins did not exercise their $2 million club option to retain Ichiro Suzuki a few weeks ago.

Lee carried over his regular-season success into the Arizona Fall League, where he batted .347 with a .398 on-base percentage.

The Marlins obtained Gonzalez from the Mets in July as part of the A.J. Ramos trade. At three Class A-level clubs, the righty had a combined record of 13-3 with a 1.66 ERA.

Video: Top Prospects: Merandy Gonzalez, RHP, Marlins

Lopez came to the Marlins in the David Phelps trade, and at Class A Advanced Jupiter, the 21-year-old right-hander posted a 2.18 ERA in 45 1/3 innings.

Needy threw 17 1/3 innings and had a 4.67 ERA at the Arizona Fall League.

Last week, the Marlins made another Minor League move, which doesn't affect their 40-man roster. Jose Pena, formerly with the Yankees' Double-A Trenton affiliate, reached agreement on a contract that does not include an invitation to Spring Training.

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

 

Miami Marlins, Garrett Cooper, Merandy Gonzalez, Braxton Lee, Pablo Lopez, Caleb Smith