Injuries & Roster Moves: J.D. set for surgery

October 3rd, 2021

The Mets begin their offseason on Oct. 4 with a handful of players still rehabbing and recovering from season-ending injuries. Keep track of their progress, plus team transactions, here throughout the offseason.

Players on the 60-day injured list must be removed from the IL and placed back on the 40-man roster following the World Series.

ROSTER MOVES

Oct. 2: RHP Robert Gsellman activated from 60-day injured list
Gsellman had been sidelined since mid-June due to a torn right lat muscle. The Mets activated him in time to give him one last appearance before the offseason, which could potentially be his final outing with the team. The right-hander is a prime non-tender candidate heading into the winter.

Oct. 2: RHP Tylor Megill optioned to Triple-A Syracuse
This move was procedural to clear space on the active roster for right-hander Robert Gsellman. Megill made his final start of the season on Friday and is not going to pitch again until 2022.

Oct. 2: INF/OF Brandon Drury recalled from Triple-A Syracuse and designated for assignment
This move was procedural to clear 40-man roster space for right-hander Robert Gsellman. Drury was likely to come off the roster anyway following the season.

INJURY UPDATES

3B (left hand sprain)
Expected return:
2022
Davis plans to undergo surgery early in October to stabilize a torn ligament in his left hand, which has bothered him since May. Davis finished the season on the injured list after trying to play through the injury at various points during the summer. All told, he appeared in 73 games for New York in 2021, slashing .285/.384/.436 with five home runs and an .820 OPS. (Last updated: Oct. 3)

C (sprained left thumb)
Expected return: 2022
Nido, who landed on the IL three separate times with the same injury, will visit a specialist after the season to determine if surgery might be necessary. He batted .222 with three homers and a .588 OPS over 58 games as James McCann’s backup and will likely battle Patrick Mazeika for that job in Spring Training. (Last updated: Oct. 3)

RHP (right shoulder inflammation)
Expected return:
2022
Smith never made it back to the mound after last appearing in a big league game on Aug. 13, but he should be fine after an offseason of rest. Prior to his injury, Smith was enjoying a solid season, going 3-1 with a 2.40 ERA primarily out of the bullpen. (Last updated: Oct. 3)

60-day IL

RHP Jacob deGrom (right elbow inflammation)
Expected return: 2022
The Mets decided during the final week of September to shut deGrom down for the season, despite the fact that he was advancing in his throwing program. Although deGrom should be ready to go by the start of Spring Training, uncertainty will continue to dog him until he proves he can put his elbow woes aside for good.

Earlier this year, deGrom was diagnosed with a partial tear of his UCL -- an issue that later resolved itself, according to team president Sandy Alderson. A day after that revelation, deGrom told reporters that his ligament “is perfectly fine.” Both he and the team agreed that the UCL is strong enough for deGrom to throw, which he began doing in late August. But deGrom simply ran out of time to return before the end of the season. The Mets are counting on him to be back to his Cy Young-caliber self by April. (Last updated: Oct. 3)

RHP (right knee inflammation)
Expected return: 2022
Oswalt, who received a cortisone injection and had fluid drained from his knee in early July, began a Minor League rehab assignment on Sept. 11 but never made it back to the Majors, in part because the team had no imminent need for him. His 40-man roster spot could be in jeopardy this winter, as the Mets have already designated him for assignment once in his career. (Last updated: Oct. 3)

LHP (recovery from ulnar nerve transposition surgery)
Expected return:
2022
Szapucki underwent his season-ending surgery in July, when he was in the Minor Leagues. He stayed there until Sept. 17, when the Mets recalled Szapucki and immediately placed him on the 60-day IL to clear 40-man roster space. The transaction changes nothing for the timeline of Szapucki, who intends to be ready by Opening Day 2022. (Last updated: Oct. 3)

INF José Martínez (torn left knee meniscus/hyperextended left shoulder)
Expected return:
2022
After a torn meniscus in his left knee kept Martínez sidelined for five months, a hyperextended left shoulder, a hip issue and lower back discomfort all affected him during his Minor League rehab assignment, preventing him from playing for the Mets at all this season. Martínez remains under team control for next year, but he is a non-tender candidate. (Last updated: Oct. 3)

LHP (Jones fracture in right foot)
Expected return:
2022
As Peterson was in the midst of recovering from a strained right oblique, he fractured his foot while walking in the Mets’ clubhouse. The left-hander underwent surgery on July 27 that ended his season. He should be recovered by the start of Spring Training, with a chance to compete for an Opening Day rotation spot. (Last updated: Oct. 3)

RHP (right hamstring strain)
Expected return: 2022
Stock injured his hamstring while running the bases during a July 20 spot start in Cincinnati and never returned. As a piece of the Mets’ pitching depth, Stock is unlikely to survive the entire winter on the 40-man roster. (Last updated: Oct. 3)

RHP (right shoulder impingement)
Expected return:
2022
Betances underwent season-ending surgery on July 7 to remove a Bennett lesion and other debris from his right shoulder. He allowed nine earned runs in 4 2/3 innings across all levels this season and has struggled in general to regain his old velocity since joining the Mets prior to the 2020 season. Betances could return on a player option in 2022. (Last updated: Oct. 3)

LHP (torn UCL in left elbow)
Expected return:
2022-23
An MRI taken on Lucchesi’s left elbow revealed a significant UCL tear, which required Tommy John surgery in June. Lucchesi, who began 2021 as a valued member of the Mets’ rotation, is likely to miss most or all of 2022. The Mets hope he can be of use to them down the stretch, or by Opening Day 2023 at the latest. (Last updated: Oct. 3)