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d'Arnaud to DL with elbow injury; TJ possible

11th-ranked prospect Nido recalled from Double-A
MLB.com

MIAMI -- Unable to keep Travis d'Arnaud healthy for the first five years of his big league career, the Mets had hoped they discovered the solution last August, when they began using d'Arnaud and Kevin Plawecki in a timeshare. Both catchers stayed healthy and productive down the stretch and into Spring Training. But another potentially serious injury for d'Arnaud has changed the equation.

The Mets placed d'Arnaud on the disabled list on Wednesday with a partial tear of the ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow. The team will determine in the next several days if d'Arnaud, 29, needs Tommy John surgery, which would end his season.

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MIAMI -- Unable to keep Travis d'Arnaud healthy for the first five years of his big league career, the Mets had hoped they discovered the solution last August, when they began using d'Arnaud and Kevin Plawecki in a timeshare. Both catchers stayed healthy and productive down the stretch and into Spring Training. But another potentially serious injury for d'Arnaud has changed the equation.

The Mets placed d'Arnaud on the disabled list on Wednesday with a partial tear of the ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow. The team will determine in the next several days if d'Arnaud, 29, needs Tommy John surgery, which would end his season.

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To replace d'Arnaud on the active roster, the Mets recalled 11th-ranked prospect Tomas Nido from Double-A Binghamton.

"That's a long road if he goes the surgery route," Mets manager Mickey Callaway said. "Anytime anybody has to go through that, that's tough."

Video: HOU@NYM: Nido starts off frame with a home run

Starting four of the Mets' first 10 games behind the plate, d'Arnaud went 3-for-15 (.200) with a home run and three RBIs, but he allowed seven stolen bases without catching a single runner. (The only caught stealing on his ledger came as a result of a pitcher pickoff throw to first base). d'Arnaud first alerted the Mets to his elbow discomfort on Tuesday, according to Callaway, then traveled to New York for an examination at the Hospital for Special Surgery. An MRI taken there on Wednesday morning revealed the UCL tear.

"Just getting the ball [to second base] seemed to be an issue early in the season," Callaway said. "So there was some concern there. I hate that it wound up being this."

Since debuting in 2013, d'Arnaud has sustained a lengthy string of injuries, spending time on the DL with a bone bruise in his right wrist, a strain in his right rotator cuff, a hyperextended left elbow, a broken finger and a concussion. Once considered the Mets' catcher of the future (and the key prospect in the R.A. Dickey trade that also netted the Mets Noah Syndergaard), d'Arnaud averaged just 91 games per year in his first four full big league seasons.

Video: STL@NYM: d'Arnaud belts a solo homer in the 4th

Yet d'Arnaud also played a key role at times, batting .268 with 12 home runs and an .825 OPS in 2015, with three additional homers in 14 postseason games that year.

In d'Arnaud's absence, the Mets will place more responsibility on Plawecki, 27, who is batting .158/.393/.200 in seven games. Given ample opportunities in the past due to d'Arnaud's injury history, Plawecki did not make much of them until he hit .303/.411/.474 in his final 27 games last year, splitting time with d'Arnaud. That was enough to earn him additional playing time heading into this season.

Plawecki departed Wednesday's 4-1 victory over the Marlins in the eighth inning after taking a 98-mph Tayron Guerrero fastball off his left hand, but X-rays were negative, and he doesn't expect to miss any time.

"Nothing's going to change for me mentally," said Plawecki, who was a groomsman at d'Arnaud's wedding this winter. "Preparation-wise, it will be the same. Obviously, a tough loss for all of us, losing a brother like that, Travis and I being pretty close and everything. I feel bad for him. But at the same time, you've got to keep moving and keep working and keep this thing going."

Video: NYM@MIA: Plawecki shaken up on hit by pitch

Plawecki will receive support from Nido, a strong defender who was batting .278/.350/.389 with two doubles and five RBIs in five games for Binghamton. Mostly due to logistics, the Mets opted to recall Nido instead of veteran Jose Lobaton, whom the team signed in December to provide organizational depth. Assistant general manager John Ricco said Lobaton could also factor into New York's short-term plans.

Mets officials will huddle in New York this week to determine longer-term options, Ricco said, in the event that d'Arnaud opts for surgery. Ricco did not reject the possibility of a trade, though a sampling of evaluators around baseball offered skepticism that the Mets will pursue a prominent bat, such as Miami's J.T. Realmuto or Oakland's Jonathan Lucroy. More likely, one said, the Mets may acquire an inexpensive backup.

"We'll discuss short-term, long-term [possibilities]," Ricco said. "We have a lot of faith in Kevin, and two guys in Tomas and Jose that we got just for this reason. … Kevin is more than ready for this challenge. It's unfortunate the way it happened, but it's certainly an opportunity for him."

Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2008. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.

New York Mets, Travis d'Arnaud, Tomas Nido

Oswalt recalled, then optioned; Nimmo sent down

MLB.com

MIAMI -- Telling Brandon Nimmo he must go to the Minors, Mickey Callaway said, was one of the most difficult conversations he has had with a player in all his years as a coach and manager. The fact that Nimmo took it as well as he did could not have helped Callaway's emotions.

But with Nimmo confined to the bench for now and the Mets leaning heavily on their relievers in recent games, they wanted to shift to an eight-man bullpen. That meant a demotion for Nimmo and a promotion for 16th-ranked prospect Corey Oswalt, whom the Mets recalled from Triple-A Las Vegas before Tuesday's 8-6 victory over the Marlins. Following the game, the Mets optioned him as the corresponding roster move for Zack Wheeler, Wednesday's starter.

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MIAMI -- Telling Brandon Nimmo he must go to the Minors, Mickey Callaway said, was one of the most difficult conversations he has had with a player in all his years as a coach and manager. The fact that Nimmo took it as well as he did could not have helped Callaway's emotions.

But with Nimmo confined to the bench for now and the Mets leaning heavily on their relievers in recent games, they wanted to shift to an eight-man bullpen. That meant a demotion for Nimmo and a promotion for 16th-ranked prospect Corey Oswalt, whom the Mets recalled from Triple-A Las Vegas before Tuesday's 8-6 victory over the Marlins. Following the game, the Mets optioned him as the corresponding roster move for Zack Wheeler, Wednesday's starter.

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"A tough break for Nimmo," Callaway said. "He deserves to be here. He handled the news unbelievably -- what a guy. He's a winning player and he's going to help us for a long, long time. So that's tough. But we felt like it was necessary."

Video: WSH@NYM: Nimmo smacks an RBI double to left field

The Mets' Opening Day center fielder, Nimmo saw his role reduce drastically when Michael Conforto came off the disabled list last Thursday. He made just three plate appearances in four games, with Conforto starting all but one game in center.

The Mets considered it more valuable to fortify their bullpen with Oswalt, 24, who allowed three runs in four innings last Thursday in his first career start at the Triple-A level. The Mets' organizational pitcher of the year in 2017, Oswalt went 12-5 with a 2.28 ERA at Double-A Binghamton to earn a spot on the Mets' 40-man roster after the season. He did not appear on Tuesday to make his Major League debut.

Video: Corey Oswalt named Mets' Pipeline pitcher of the year

Barring an injury on the Mets' 25-man roster, Nimmo must stay in the Minors for at least 10 days. He was batting .333 with a 1.044 OPS in 15 plate appearances, which came on the heels of a strong September and big league Spring Training.

"He wasn't getting to play as much as he probably needs to play," Callaway said. "This kid's going to be an everyday player. Anytime we can get him as many at-bats as possible is probably to his benefit."

For Nimmo, Conforto, Yoenis Cespedes and Jay Bruce all to start, Bruce would need to move to first base -- something the Mets were unwilling to explore during Spring Training. But Bruce began taking reps at the position for the first time on Tuesday, keeping himself versatile in case the Mets do ask him to do that later this summer.

Video: NYM@MIA: Bruce snags grounders at first before game

Wheels up
Joining the Mets in Miami in advance of his Wednesday assignment, Wheeler said his successful debut at Triple-A -- six strikeouts in five innings of one-run ball -- was due in part to his increased comfort with a new delivery. Wheeler has been working since spring on keeping his arm higher while throwing to decrease the stress on it.

"It's hard because you've been doing something for so long," Wheeler said. "It's muscle memory to sort of just drop back down."

Video: Zack Wheeler talks returning to the Mets' rotation

With Jason Vargas recovering slowly from surgery to remove a broken bone from his glove hand, Wheeler should have a chance to make at least two starts in the big leagues -- and possibly more, if he thrives. A favorite to make the rotation when Vargas broke his hand, Wheeler lost that opportunity when he went 0-1 with an 8.10 ERA in five Grapefruit League outings. He has made just 17 starts, with a 5.21 ERA, since undergoing Tommy John surgery in March 2015.

"Stuff happens," Wheeler said. "I'm grateful to be up here and hopefully I can make a little statement."

Tuning in 
The Mets are as hot on the airwaves as they are on the field. Their win Monday over the Marlins drew a 4.50 household rating, SNY's second-highest-rated broadcast since the 2015 postseason chase.

Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo, Instagram and Facebook.

New York Mets, Brandon Nimmo, Corey Oswalt, Zack Wheeler

L.J. Mazzilli to Yanks in rare swap with Mets

Father Lee played for both New York teams, also coached for Yankees
MLB.com

In a rare trade between New York's teams, the Yankees and Mets agreed Tuesday on a deal that sent infielder/outfielder L.J. Mazzilli to the Yanks in exchange for outfielder Kendall Coleman.

Mazzilli batted .254/.340/.362 with five home runs and 40 RBIs in 110 games split between Double-A Binghamton and Triple-A Las Vegas in 2017. He had two hits in his first six at-bats of 2018.

In a rare trade between New York's teams, the Yankees and Mets agreed Tuesday on a deal that sent infielder/outfielder L.J. Mazzilli to the Yanks in exchange for outfielder Kendall Coleman.

Mazzilli batted .254/.340/.362 with five home runs and 40 RBIs in 110 games split between Double-A Binghamton and Triple-A Las Vegas in 2017. He had two hits in his first six at-bats of 2018.

The 27-year-old is the son of former Major Leaguer Lee Mazzilli, who was a National League All-Star with the Mets in 1979 and played for the Yankees in '82. The elder Mazzilli was a two-time World Series champion, winning a title as a player with the Mets in 1986 and as a coach with the Yanks in 2000. He also was the manager of the Orioles from 2004-05.

Coleman, 22, is a career .207/.309/.301 hitter throughout five seasons in the Minor Leagues. He has 10 homers and 86 RBIs in 231 games over that span.

History of Yankees-Mets trades
Dec. 19, 2014: Yankees purchase Gonzalez Germen from Mets
Dec. 3, 2004: Mets trade Mike Stanton to Yankees for Felix Heredia
July 16, 2003: Yankees trade Ryan Bicondoa, Jason Anderson and Anderson Garcia to Mets for Armando Benitez
Dec. 7, 2001: Yankees trade David Justice to Mets for Robin Ventura
Sept. 17, 1993: Yankees trade Kenny Greer to Mets for Frank Tanana
June 9, 1992: Mets trade Tim Burke to Yankees for Lee Guetterman
July 10, 1989: Mets trade Marcus Lawton to Yankees for Scott Nielsen
Dec. 11, 1987: Yankees trade Steve Frey, Phil Lombardi and Darren Reed to Mets for Victor Garcia and Rafael Santana
April 18, 1983: Yankees trade Tucker Ashford to Mets for a player to be named later and Steve Ray. Mets sent Felix Perdomo to Yankees to complete trade
April 1, 1980: Yankees purchase Marshall Brant from Mets
Dec. 9, 1977: Yankees trade Sergio Ferrer to Mets for Roy Staiger
July, 1972: As part of a 3-team trade, Yankees send Tommie Sheppard to Expos. Expos send Dave McDonald to Mets
June 28, 1967: Mets purchase Hal Reniff from Yankees
June 15, 1966: Mets purchase Bob Friend from Yankees

Oliver Macklin is a reporter for MLB.com based in Washington, D.C. Follow him on Twitter at @basebollie.

New York Mets, New York Yankees

Tebow homers on 1st pitch he sees in Double-A

MLB.com

Tim Tebow started his season with a bang … again.

In his first Double-A at-bat Thursday -- on the very first pitch he saw for Binghamton in the first inning -- the former NFL quarterback-turned-Mets Minor Leaguer launched a three-run homer to give his team a five-run lead. Binghamton ended up beating the Portland Sea Dogs, 6-0.

Tim Tebow started his season with a bang … again.

In his first Double-A at-bat Thursday -- on the very first pitch he saw for Binghamton in the first inning -- the former NFL quarterback-turned-Mets Minor Leaguer launched a three-run homer to give his team a five-run lead. Binghamton ended up beating the Portland Sea Dogs, 6-0.

MiLB Video: Tebow's homer

It's the second straight year that Tebow has homered in his first at-bat of the season. Last April, he homered in the first at-bat of his Minor League debut with the Class A Columbia Fireflies.

Tebow is starting the 2018 Minor League season at Double-A after spending a good chunk of Spring Training in big league camp, where he went 1-for-18. He started Thursday's game in left field and was batting seventh for the Rumble Ponies.

Tweet from @MLB: First pitch for @TimTebow in Double-A? GONE!(via @Mets) pic.twitter.com/ZrcFPezkCl

David Adler is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @_dadler.

New York Mets, Tim Tebow

Where Mets' Top 30 prospects are starting season

MLB.com

With the 2018 season getting started, here's a look at where the Mets' Top 30 prospects are starting the season:

1. Andres Gimenez, SS -- St. Lucie Mets (A Adv)
2. David Peterson, LHP -- Extended spring training
3. Justin Dunn, RHP -- St. Lucie Mets (A Adv)
4. Peter Alonso, 1B -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
5. Thomas Szapucki, LHP -- Out for season
6. Mark Vientos, 3B -- Extended spring training
7. Desmond Lindsay, OF -- St. Lucie Mets (A Adv)
8. Marcos Molina, RHP -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
9. Chris Flexen, RHP -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
10. Luis Guillorme, 2B/SS -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
11. Tomas Nido, C -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
12. Ronny Mauricio, SS -- Extended spring training
13. Jordan Humphreys, RHP -- Out for season
14. Anthony Kay, LHP -- Columbia Fireflies (A)
15. Adrian Hernandez, OF -- Extended spring training
16. Corey Oswalt, RHP -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
17. Jhoan Urena, OF/3B/1B -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
18. Gavin Cecchini, 2B/SS -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
19. Wuilmer Becerra, OF -- Extended spring training
20. Luis Carpio, SS/2B -- St. Lucie Mets (A Adv)
21. Gregory Guerrero, 2B/SS -- Extended spring training
22. David Thompson, 3B -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
23. Jamie Callahan, RHP -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
24. P.J. Conlon, LHP -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
25. Patrick Mazeika, C/1B -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
26. Stephen Nogosek, RHP -- St. Lucie Mets (A Adv)
27. Ali Sanchez, C -- Extended spring training
28. Quinn Brodey, OF -- Columbia Fireflies (A)
29. Gerson Bautista, RHP -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
30. Jacob Rhame, RHP -- New York Mets (MLB)

With the 2018 season getting started, here's a look at where the Mets' Top 30 prospects are starting the season:

1. Andres Gimenez, SS -- St. Lucie Mets (A Adv)
2. David Peterson, LHP -- Extended spring training
3. Justin Dunn, RHP -- St. Lucie Mets (A Adv)
4. Peter Alonso, 1B -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
5. Thomas Szapucki, LHP -- Out for season
6. Mark Vientos, 3B -- Extended spring training
7. Desmond Lindsay, OF -- St. Lucie Mets (A Adv)
8. Marcos Molina, RHP -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
9. Chris Flexen, RHP -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
10. Luis Guillorme, 2B/SS -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
11. Tomas Nido, C -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
12. Ronny Mauricio, SS -- Extended spring training
13. Jordan Humphreys, RHP -- Out for season
14. Anthony Kay, LHP -- Columbia Fireflies (A)
15. Adrian Hernandez, OF -- Extended spring training
16. Corey Oswalt, RHP -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
17. Jhoan Urena, OF/3B/1B -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
18. Gavin Cecchini, 2B/SS -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
19. Wuilmer Becerra, OF -- Extended spring training
20. Luis Carpio, SS/2B -- St. Lucie Mets (A Adv)
21. Gregory Guerrero, 2B/SS -- Extended spring training
22. David Thompson, 3B -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
23. Jamie Callahan, RHP -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
24. P.J. Conlon, LHP -- Las Vegas 51s (AAA)
25. Patrick Mazeika, C/1B -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
26. Stephen Nogosek, RHP -- St. Lucie Mets (A Adv)
27. Ali Sanchez, C -- Extended spring training
28. Quinn Brodey, OF -- Columbia Fireflies (A)
29. Gerson Bautista, RHP -- Binghamton Rumble Ponies (AA)
30. Jacob Rhame, RHP -- New York Mets (MLB)

Mets prospect coverage | Mets Top 30 prospects stats

Team to watch
Want to know who might help out in New York this season? Then head to Vegas, baby. That's where seven of the organization's Top 30 will be starting the year, including two of the top 10 prospects in Flexen and Guillorme. Oswalt and Cecchini give the 51s four guys from the top 20.

Where baseball's top prospects are starting the 2018 season

Teams on MiLB.TV
Las Vegas 51s
Binghamton Rumble Ponies
Columbia Fireflies

New faces
The Mets were active in the international market last summer, handing out a pair of seven-figure bonuses to bring in some high-end talent. Mauricio received $2.1 million to sign, while Hernandez got $1.5 million. Both will make their official organizational debuts later this summer.

He might not seem like a new face since he was taken in the first round of the 2016 Draft, but Kay has yet to throw a pitch as a Met. The UConn product needed Tommy John surgery and missed the '17 season, but he's ready to head to Columbia, and he could move quickly once he gets some innings under his belt.

On the shelf
Humphreys looked like a late-round triumph as an 18th-round pick in 2015 who dominated the rookie-level Appalachian League in '16, then did the same thing in the full-season South Atlantic League in '17 to earn a promotion up a level. But after two starts in the Florida State League, he was shut down and needed Tommy John surgery. He'll try to keep exceeding expectations next year.

David Peterson, the Mets' first-round pick in 2017, isn't hurt. But the lefty out of Oregon wasn't quite ready to go on Opening Day, so the Mets are keeping him back in extended spring training for a bit before sending him out for his full-season debut.

Jonathan Mayo is a reporter for MLB Pipeline. Follow him on Twitter @JonathanMayo and Facebook, and listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

New York Mets

Where Cards' Top 30 prospects are starting season

MLB.com

With the 2018 season getting started, here's a look at where the Cards' Top 30 prospects are starting the season:

1. Alex Reyes (MLB No. 17), RHP -- St. Louis Cardinals (MLB) -- DL
2. Jack Flaherty (MLB No. 38), RHP -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)*
3. Carson Kelly (MLB No. 46), C -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
4. Tyler O'Neill (MLB No. 94), OF -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
5. Harrison Bader, OF -- St. Louis Cardinals (MLB)
6. Dakota Hudson, RHP -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
7. Jordan Hicks, RHP -- St. Louis Cardinals (MLB)
8. Ryan Helsley, RHP -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
9. Andrew Knizner, C -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
10. Max Schrock, 2B -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
11. Randy Arozarena, OF/2B -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
12. Yairo Munoz, SS -- St. Louis Cardinals (MLB)
13. Oscar Mercado, OF -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
14. Austin Gomber, LHP -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
15. Junior Fernandez, RHP -- Palm Beach Cardinals (A)
16. Edmundo Sosa, SS -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
17. Jonathan Machado, OF -- Peoria Chiefs (A)
18. Dylan Carlson, OF -- Peoria Chiefs (A)
19. Wadye Ynfante, OF -- Extended spring training
20. Alvaro Seijas, RHP -- Peoria Chiefs (A)
21. Conner Greene, RHP -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
22. Jake Woodford, RHP -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
23. Connor Jones, RHP -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
24. Johan Oviedo, RHP -- Peoria Chiefs (A)
25. Delvin Perez, SS -- Extended spring training
26. Tommy Edman, SS -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
27. Zach Jackson, C -- Extended spring training
28. Derian Gonzalez, RHP -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
29. Ryan Sherriff, LHP -- St. Louis Cardinals (MLB)
30. Casey Meisner, RHP -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)

With the 2018 season getting started, here's a look at where the Cards' Top 30 prospects are starting the season:

1. Alex Reyes (MLB No. 17), RHP -- St. Louis Cardinals (MLB) -- DL
2. Jack Flaherty (MLB No. 38), RHP -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)*
3. Carson Kelly (MLB No. 46), C -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
4. Tyler O'Neill (MLB No. 94), OF -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
5. Harrison Bader, OF -- St. Louis Cardinals (MLB)
6. Dakota Hudson, RHP -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
7. Jordan Hicks, RHP -- St. Louis Cardinals (MLB)
8. Ryan Helsley, RHP -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
9. Andrew Knizner, C -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
10. Max Schrock, 2B -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
11. Randy Arozarena, OF/2B -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
12. Yairo Munoz, SS -- St. Louis Cardinals (MLB)
13. Oscar Mercado, OF -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
14. Austin Gomber, LHP -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
15. Junior Fernandez, RHP -- Palm Beach Cardinals (A)
16. Edmundo Sosa, SS -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
17. Jonathan Machado, OF -- Peoria Chiefs (A)
18. Dylan Carlson, OF -- Peoria Chiefs (A)
19. Wadye Ynfante, OF -- Extended spring training
20. Alvaro Seijas, RHP -- Peoria Chiefs (A)
21. Conner Greene, RHP -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
22. Jake Woodford, RHP -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
23. Connor Jones, RHP -- Memphis Redbirds (AAA)
24. Johan Oviedo, RHP -- Peoria Chiefs (A)
25. Delvin Perez, SS -- Extended spring training
26. Tommy Edman, SS -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
27. Zach Jackson, C -- Extended spring training
28. Derian Gonzalez, RHP -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)
29. Ryan Sherriff, LHP -- St. Louis Cardinals (MLB)
30. Casey Meisner, RHP -- Springfield Cardinals (AA)

Cardinals prospect coverage | Cards Top 30 prospects stats

Team to watch
The Cardinals have a lot of talent collecting at the upper levels of their system, with 16 of the Top 30 starting either with Double-A Springfield or Triple-A Memphis. While Springfield leads the way with nine Top 30 guys, Memphis should be awfully fun to watch with four of the top six in Flaherty, Kelly, O'Neill and Hudson. Three more -- Schrock, Mercado and Gomber -- are ranked in the 10-15 range on the list.

Where baseball's top prospects are starting the 2018 season

Teams on MiLB.TV
Memphis Redbirds
Springfield Cardinals
State College Spikes

New faces
Munoz came over in December as part of the Stephen Piscotty trade, and he has mamde quite a first impression, hitting .323/.364/.516. That, plus his versatility, landed him a spot on the big league roster on Opening Day.

When the Cardinals traded Randal Grichuk to the Blue Jays in January, they got right-hander Greene in return. His arm strength and size have long been intriguing, though he struggled in Double-A with Toronto last year. He'll head back to that level, this time in the Texas League for his Cardinals debut. He'll be joined by Meisner, who was acquired from the A's in return for reliever Josh Lucas on Saturday.

On the shelf
Reyes continues to rehab from the Tommy John surgery he had in February 2017. He's on track to return at the beginning of May.

*Flaherty started the season with the Cardinals but was optioned Wednesday to Triple-A Memphis.

Jonathan Mayo is a reporter for MLB Pipeline. Follow him on Twitter @JonathanMayo and Facebook, and listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

New York Mets

Prospect report: Mets camp

MLB.com

Every Spring Training, prospects get a chance to show what they can do as they prepare for the upcoming season. Some compete for jobs in big league camp, while others vie for spots on Minor League affiliates. MLB Pipeline will visit all 30 camps this spring, and today we check in on the Mets.

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. -- The New York Mets' farm system has a different look this year after graduating shortstop Amed Rosario and first baseman Dominic Smith, the club's two best prospects at this time last year, to the Major Leagues during the 2017 season.

Every Spring Training, prospects get a chance to show what they can do as they prepare for the upcoming season. Some compete for jobs in big league camp, while others vie for spots on Minor League affiliates. MLB Pipeline will visit all 30 camps this spring, and today we check in on the Mets.

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. -- The New York Mets' farm system has a different look this year after graduating shortstop Amed Rosario and first baseman Dominic Smith, the club's two best prospects at this time last year, to the Major Leagues during the 2017 season.

Mets' Top 30 Prospects list | Q&A with Anthony Kay

But while the arrival of the highly touted duo has given the Mets franchise a young tandem to build around in the coming years, it's also highlighted the organization's lack of impactful Major League-ready prospects down on the farm. Though, that's not to say that this is a system devoid of impact prospects.

:: MLB Pipeline Spring Training reports ::

Top prospect Andres Gimenez quickly has emerged as the gem of the Mets' system since signing out of Venezuela for $1.2 million in July 2015 at age 16. The left-handed-hitting shortstop excelled during his pro debut the following year in the Dominican Summer League, ranking second in the circuit in average (.350) and third in OPS (.992) while exhibiting plate discipline and an approach that belied his age in the form of 46 walks and 22 strikeouts.

The performance convinced the Mets that Gimenez was equipped to be challenged during his United States debut in 2018. They assigned him straight to full-season Class A Columbia in the South Atlantic League, where, at age 18, he spent the season as one of the circuit's youngest everyday players, posting a .265/.346/.349 slash line with 17 extra-base hits and 14 stolen bases in 92 games.

"He responded great, and I think it was a big learning season for him," Mets director of player development Ian Levin said. "Initially when he got [to Columbia], he tried to do a bit too much and got away from the player he's capable of being. But as the year went on he got more comfortable within himself. And by the end, he was doing well there. I think it was a really positive year for him -- one that will really help him going forward."

The Mets also have high expectations for No. 2 prospect David Peterson, the club's first-round selection in the 2017 Draft. The 6-foot-6 left-hander showed he could pile up whiffs last spring as an Oregon junior, turning in a 20-strikeout performance and averaging 12.6 strikeouts-per-nine en route to becoming the No. 20 overall pick in June. He made his pro debut in the Class A Short-Season New York-Penn League after signing for slot value, though complications from an ingrown toenail limited him to just three starts.

"David probably wouldn't have thrown much anyway because he was on the same schedule as all of our college guys that first year, so he just got a few less innings in the long run," said Levin about Peterson's abbreviated pro debut.

Healthy this spring, Peterson has impressed Mets officials with his leadership skills in Minor League camp, continuing a trend that has seen the 22-year-old southpaw emerge as a leader within the organization in a short amount of time.

"First of all, he's an excellent worker -- a guy who puts in the time that it takes in order to become a good player and takes pride in all of the things that he does on and off the field. He sets a good example for everybody. Now it's just a matter of getting him on-mound experience," said Levin.

Video: Alonso, Guillorme prepare for 2018 season

Camp standouts

The Mets will be without left-handed pitcher Thomas Szapucki (Mets' No. 5) and righty Jordan Humphreys (No. 13) this year as they each work their way back from respective Tommy John surgeries. The club will, however, receive a boost from the return of Anthony Kay, a 2016 first-rounder who missed all of last season recovering from Tommy John surgery.

Ranked No. 14 on the Mets' Top 30 list, Kay looked like a potential quick-to-the-big-leagues college lefty during his final season at the University of Connecticut, showcasing a promising blend of stuff and pitchability. Though he's now behind the development curve, the Mets believe Kay, once he gets on the mound and establishes a workload, could still move quickly in his path to become a mid-rotation starter at the highest level.

"He has looked good this spring," said Levin of the 23-year-old southpaw. "He's looked healthy, looked strong out here, so it's nice to see that. He hasn't thrown yet professionally but has all the makings of it and the pedigree for it. He obviously needs to get on the mound and be built up, but I expect good things out of him."

Levin and the Mets are similarly excited for what the upcoming season holds for No. 6 prospect Mark Vientos, New York's second-round pick in the 2017 Draft. The 18-year-old third baseman impressed last summer during his pro debut by posting a .262/.318/.398 slash line with four home runs and 14 doubles across a pair of Rookie levels, and he has continued to open eyes in his first Spring Training, showing improved physicality that has helped him makes gains on both sides of the ball.

"He's actually someone that has gotten a little bit better already," noted Levin. "He's already matured some physically and is starting to really show the power we thought he'd have. And he's still agile and mobile defensively, so that hasn't affected him. It's been a very strong showing for him so far -- all the steps are going in the right direction for him."

Mike Rosenbaum is a reporter for MLB Pipeline. Follow him on Twitter at @GoldenSombrero.

New York Mets

Mets' Alonso boasts eye-opening power

College assistant coach on budding slugger: 'He just tried to disintegrate balls'
MLB.com

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Peter Alonso was hitting in the batting cage one day during his freshman year of college when Kevin O'Sullivan, the University of Florida's longtime head coach, shouted to him that he looked like Paul Konerko: big, burly, a right-handed masher. If it wasn't meant to be a transcendent moment, something nonetheless clicked in Alonso's brain. A self-described "baseball freak" who grew up idolizing Mike Piazza and other righty sluggers, Alonso sat down shortly thereafter to watch video of Konerko's swing.

"I was shocked," Alonso said. "I was like, 'I'll take it.'"

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WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Peter Alonso was hitting in the batting cage one day during his freshman year of college when Kevin O'Sullivan, the University of Florida's longtime head coach, shouted to him that he looked like Paul Konerko: big, burly, a right-handed masher. If it wasn't meant to be a transcendent moment, something nonetheless clicked in Alonso's brain. A self-described "baseball freak" who grew up idolizing Mike Piazza and other righty sluggers, Alonso sat down shortly thereafter to watch video of Konerko's swing.

"I was shocked," Alonso said. "I was like, 'I'll take it.'"

View Full Game Coverage

Over the next two years, Alonso worked to be like Konerko, but he wasn't certain he was succeeding until he decided to play through a broken bone in his left hand in the 2016 NCAA tournament. Risking further injury in an attempt to win a championship -- and to win over scouts in advance of the upcoming MLB Draft -- Alonso recalled "crushing balls" despite the pain in his hand. He hit .500 in the NCAA tournament. Five of his 16 hits went over the fence.

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"I guess that's when the lightbulb really turned on," said Alonso, whom MLB Pipeline ranks as the Mets' No. 4 prospect.

It was enough for the Mets to select Alonso with their second-round Draft pick, adding depth behind former first-rounder Dominic Smith -- if not an outright challenger to Smith's mantle as New York's first baseman of the future. Since the Draft, Alonso has hit .297 with a .903 OPS and 23 home runs in 123 professional games.

Video: NYM@HOU: Evans fields tough grounder, Alonso scoops

Those stats may look nice, but the numbers behind the numbers are what truly intrigue the Mets. Last season, Alonso's 92.5-mph average exit velocity ranked tops at any level of the organization. Only three qualified Major Leaguers -- Aaron Judge, Nelson Cruz and Joey Gallo -- posted higher exit velocity averages, according to Statcast™, meaning Alonso clocked in ahead of players such as Paul Goldschmidt, another right-handed slugger he has long idolized; Giancarlo Stanton, the National League MVP Award winner; and Lucas Duda, who led the Mets in exit velocity.

In a way, Duda -- whom Alonso may ultimately replace -- paved the way for players like Alonso. Back in 2014, when the Mets were trying to decide whether Duda or Ike Davis was their first baseman of the future, they based their choice on exit velocity figures, making a novel decision that ultimately proved correct. Like most teams, the Mets now rely heavily on such data when evaluating prospects.

On those spreadsheets, Alonso has always been an outlier. A slugger since his youth, Alonso arrived at Florida "a bull in a china shop," according to Florida assistant coach Brad Weitzel.

:: Spring Training coverage presented by Camping World ::

"He just tried to disintegrate balls," Weitzel said. "That's all he tried to do. But there was no real contact skills, working on going the other way, becoming a hitter. For me, you've got to learn how to hit before power means anything."

Working with Weitzel, O'Sullivan and a private swing coach he has used since age eight, Alonso learned patience, increasing his walk rate from 8 percent as a college freshman to 12 percent as a junior. His strikeout totals as a professional have hovered in the mid-teens, making him far more than a prototypical all-or-nothing slugger. Alonso's batting practice sessions are spectacles; at Double-A Binghamton last summer, manager Luis Rojas instructed his infielders to take a step or two back when Alonso entered the cage.

Where it goes from here is contingent on Alonso submitting his first full professional season -- he lost a month and a half last year to another hand injury -- in 2018.

Tweet from @AnthonyDiComo: Mike Piazza stood behind the cage earlier today, watching Peter Alonso's batting practice. Afterward, he gave the Mets first-base prospect a few pointers. pic.twitter.com/rzFQPx7qP5

For now, he feels at home in big league camp, where Smith's leg injury has afforded him ample playing time. Long a Mets admirer due to his love for Piazza, Alonso once did a high school Spanish class project on Jose Reyes. He grew up a fan of David Wright, another of this generation's best right-handed hitters. He has spent time this spring working on his defense with four-time Gold Glove Award winner Adrian Gonzalez, who has gone out of his way to provide the type of tutelage Alonso has always craved.

"He wants to get better. He wants to be an item," Weitzel said. "Every day he goes to the field, sweat is just pouring off him. … You can just see he's not going to be a backup player."

Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo, Instagram and Facebook.

New York Mets, Peter Alonso

Gimenez leads new Mets Top 30 Prospects list

MLB.com

Things didn't exactly go as planned for the Mets in 2017, a season they thought they would compete in that went south and ended with a fourth-place finish in the National League East. Injuries to some homegrown pitchers were a key culprit and for the first time in three years, there were no Mets mentioned in the NL Rookie of the Year Award voting (Jacob deGrom won the award in 2014, Noah Syndergaard finished fourth in '15 and Steven Matz got a vote in '16).

Mets' Top 30 Prospects list

Things didn't exactly go as planned for the Mets in 2017, a season they thought they would compete in that went south and ended with a fourth-place finish in the National League East. Injuries to some homegrown pitchers were a key culprit and for the first time in three years, there were no Mets mentioned in the NL Rookie of the Year Award voting (Jacob deGrom won the award in 2014, Noah Syndergaard finished fourth in '15 and Steven Matz got a vote in '16).

Mets' Top 30 Prospects list

While there were no ROY candidates, the farm system did produce some big leaguers definitely worth watching. Shortstop Amed Rosario, who was ranked as one of the top prospects in the game a year ago, graduated off of rankings and showed glimpses of the star he has the potential to become. Dominic Smith, a fellow Top 100 prospect a year ago, struggled a bit in his call to New York, but did hit a combined 25 home runs and drove in over 100 runs between Triple-A and the big leagues. And outfielder Brandon Nimmo showed his on-base skills will play at the highest level.

:: Team Top 30 Prospects lists ::

There aren't those kinds of impact players brimming at the upper levels of the system waiting to break through in 2018, though there is some rotation depth that could contribute. Chris Flexen was pressed into service last year, and could be more up to the challenge now, while arms like Marcos Molina and Corey Oswalt could fit into the back of a big league rotation soon.

The Mets also brought in some big arms that should help out the bullpen in 2018. Jamie Callahan and Jacob Rhame got their feet wet after coming over in deals and both have close to top-of-the-scale fastballs at their disposal.

And while there may not be a Rosario or Smith lurking, role players like infielder Luis Guillorme and catcher Tomas Nido could spend considerable time in Citi Field this season. Longer-term, the Mets do have some possible impact talent coming, largely via the international market. Top prospect Andres Gimenez is a future Top 100 candidate as he matures, even if he has to slide over to second in deference to Rosario. The Mets were aggressive in 2017, signing both shortstop Ronny Mauricio and outfielder Adrian Hernandez to seven-figure bonuses. It might take a while, but they could bring another round of Mets farm system dominance to fruition.

Biggest jump/fall
Here are the players whose ranks changed the most from the 2017 preseason list to the 2018 preseason list.

Jump: Chris Flexen, RHP (2017: 29 | 2018: 9)
Fall: Gavin Cecchini, 2B/SS (2017: 7 | 2018: 18)

Best tools
Players are graded on a 20-80 scouting scale for future tools -- 20-30 is well below average, 40 is below average, 50 is average, 60 is above average and 70-80 is well above average. Players in parentheses have the same grade.

Hit: 60 - Andres Gimenez
Power: 55 - Peter Alonso (Mark Vientos, David Thompson)
Run: 60 - Adrian Hernandez (Desmond Lindsay)
Arm: 65 - Ali Sanchez
Defense: 70 - Luis Guillorme
Fastball: 70 - Gerson Bautista (Jacob Rhame)
Curveball: 60 - Thomas Szapucki
Slider: 55 - David Peterson (Justin Dunn, Marcos Molina, Gerson Bautista)
Changeup: 60 - P.J. Conlon
Control: 60 - Conlon (Justin Dunn, Jordan Humphreys)

How they were built
Draft: 17
International: 7
Trade: 4
Free agent: 1
Rule 5: 1

Breakdown by ETA
2018: 10
2019: 7
2020: 7
2021: 4
2022: 2

Breakdown by position
C: 3
1B: 1
2B: 2
3B: 2
SS: 4
OF: 5
RHP: 9
LHP: 4

Jonathan Mayo is a reporter for MLB Pipeline. Follow him on Twitter @JonathanMayo and Facebook, and listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

New York Mets

Alonso among top prospects at first base

MLB.com

NEW YORK -- Quite suddenly at first base, the Mets appear well-heeled. Five-time All-Star Adrian Gonzalez will man the position most days in April. Wilmer Flores remains a steady option against left-handed pitchers. Dominic Smith is still the Mets' first baseman of the future, in the organization's eyes -- and a promising one at that.

But it may not be long before another competitor enters the fray. Coming off a standout -- albeit injury-shortened -- first full Minor League season, Peter Alonso is ranked No. 7 on MLB Pipeline's updated list of top first-base prospects. Tampa Bay's Brendan McKay, the No. 4 overall pick in last year's Draft, led a list that includes some of Minor League Baseball's heaviest hitters.

NEW YORK -- Quite suddenly at first base, the Mets appear well-heeled. Five-time All-Star Adrian Gonzalez will man the position most days in April. Wilmer Flores remains a steady option against left-handed pitchers. Dominic Smith is still the Mets' first baseman of the future, in the organization's eyes -- and a promising one at that.

But it may not be long before another competitor enters the fray. Coming off a standout -- albeit injury-shortened -- first full Minor League season, Peter Alonso is ranked No. 7 on MLB Pipeline's updated list of top first-base prospects. Tampa Bay's Brendan McKay, the No. 4 overall pick in last year's Draft, led a list that includes some of Minor League Baseball's heaviest hitters.

:: Top 10 Prospects by Position ::

A college standout at the University of Florida, Alonso parlayed a strong junior season into a second-round Draft selection by the Mets, who considered his power potential as substantial as that of nearly anyone in the 2016 Draft. That tool manifested itself in a significant way last summer, when Alonso hit 18 home runs with a .524 slugging percentage over two levels, rising from Class A Advanced St. Lucie to Double-A Binghamton in late August.

It was a promotion that came two months after Alonso returned from a broken hand -- an injury that did not bog down his offensive statistics, despite costing him a significant chunk of the summer. Overall, in parts of two professional seasons, the 23-year-old Alonso has hit 23 homers in 123 games with a .903 OPS.

"He's got a chance to be a prototypical slugging first baseman," Mets director of Minor League player development Ian Levin said. "He has elite raw power and has shown consistent ability to use it in games, and his overall ability to hit should allow him to continue to progress."

Like most first-base prospects, Alonso's burden is that to succeed in the Majors, he must not just hit, but hit with authority. Alonso is likely ticketed to begin this season back at Binghamton, where he mashed five home runs in 11 games down the stretch in 2017. Similar success early this year could hasten Alonso's rise to Triple-A Las Vegas, a hitter-friendly environment where sluggers such as him tend to thrive.

From there, it's just a quick hop to the Majors, where Alonso could provide a legitimate challenge to Smith -- or become a tantalizing trade chip for help at another position.

Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2008. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo and Facebook.

New York Mets

Bullpen, infield Mets' priorities at Meetings

Reliever Reed, 2B Walker could return; Lind on radar for 1B depth
MLB.com

NEW YORK -- The first five weeks of the Hot Stove season may have come and gone quietly for the Mets, but that is about to change. A team in need of multiple significant pieces is bound to spring into action soon, with the baseball industry's annual Winter Meetings providing the proper atmosphere next week in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.

After trading Lucas Duda, Addison Reed, Jay Bruce, Neil Walker and Curtis Granderson last summer, the Mets simply have too many holes to fill to stay quiet. They've spent much of the last month focusing on their managerial, coaching and training staff hires, as the player market around baseball stayed cold. It's not a silence that can last.

NEW YORK -- The first five weeks of the Hot Stove season may have come and gone quietly for the Mets, but that is about to change. A team in need of multiple significant pieces is bound to spring into action soon, with the baseball industry's annual Winter Meetings providing the proper atmosphere next week in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.

After trading Lucas Duda, Addison Reed, Jay Bruce, Neil Walker and Curtis Granderson last summer, the Mets simply have too many holes to fill to stay quiet. They've spent much of the last month focusing on their managerial, coaching and training staff hires, as the player market around baseball stayed cold. It's not a silence that can last.

Hot Stove Tracker

Here, then, is a look at what the Mets hope to accomplish at the Winter Meetings and beyond:

Club needs

Bullpen: The Mets have made this their clear top priority, and it's one they're likely to address soon. General manager Sandy Alderson's goal is to find at least one established reliever to group with Jeurys Familia, AJ Ramos and Jerry Blevins at the back of new manager Mickey Callaway's bullpen, and it appears he's willing to spend a sizeable portion of his budget to do so. Realistically, the Mets will shop in the second tier of free-agent relievers -- a group that includes Brandon Morrow, Bryan Shaw and Reed.

Video: NYM@SEA: Reed retires Cruz to solidify the save

Second base: Though there is a chance the Mets could pivot and acquire a third baseman instead, pushing Asdrubal Cabrera to the keystone, the team's clear preference is to fill its infield gap at second. The trade market appears riper than free agency, with Ian Kinsler among those reportedly available. But the Mets could also pursue an old friend, Walker, on the open market.

First base/outfield: Ideally, the Mets will acquire a hybrid capable of playing both these positions, such as Bruce, Logan Morrison or Adam Lind. That would cover them in the outfield in the event that Michael Conforto's recovery from shoulder surgery stalls, and at first base in case Dominic Smith's rookie struggles spill over into his sophomore season.

Video: Smith on fighting to earn job at first base in 2018

Who they can trade if necessary

The Mets do not have many trade chips available at the Major or Minor League levels. Their lack of rotation depth should prevent them from dealing Seth Lugo or Robert Gsellman to fill other needs, and their selloff of veteran hitters last summer left them without much fat on their active roster. Perhaps Wilmer Flores, a valuable platoon infielder, could become expendable if the Mets acquire the right infield piece. Perhaps Smith could entice, but the Mets would be selling low on him.

On the farm, the Mets have already graduated top prospects Amed Rosario and Smith, leaving their system relatively thin. It is unlikely the Mets could make a major trade splash using just prospects.

Top prospects

Per MLBPipeline.com, the Mets' top prospects are left-hander David Peterson, right-hander Justin Dunn, shortstop Andres Gimenez, left-hander Thomas Szapucki, outfielder Desmond Lindsay, right-hander Marcos Molina, first baseman Peter Alonso, infielder Gavin Cecchini, catcher Tomas Nido and third baseman Mark Vientos.

Of that group, only Cecchini and Nido are likely to play significant roles in 2018. Gimenez, who is just 19, shot up the prospect ranks this year and boasts a high ceiling. Peterson, the Mets' first-round Draft pick in June, is about to enter his first full professional season.

Video: NYM@PHI: Cecchini makes a tough scoop to rob Herrera

Rule 5 Draft

The Mets have selected and kept just one Rule 5 selection, Sean Gilmartin, since 2010. That trend isn't likely to change now, with a jammed 40-man roster and a crowded bullpen.

Big contracts they might unload

The only guaranteed contracts on New York's books are those of David Wright, Yoenis Cespedes, Cabrera, Juan Lagares and Blevins. Of that group, only Lagares stands even the slightest chance of being traded, and that's unlikely given the Mets' uncertainty in center field.

Payroll summary

The Mets opened last season north of $155 million, a number that Alderson has expressed a desire to stay below this offseason. But the GM hinted that he convinced ownership to overspend its budget last offseason, with a promise to unload salary if things went south. When they did, Alderson kept his promise, which could earn him enough trust to make a similar bargain this offseason.

Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2008. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo and Facebook.

New York Mets

Prospect Nido learns from '17 MLB, AFL stints

MLB.com

NEW YORK -- Though he spent many summers of his youth traveling to Florida for baseball leagues, Tomas Nido did not permanently move from Puerto Rico until his junior year of high school. It was there, at Orangewood Christian High School outside Orlando, that Nido developed into an eighth-round Draft pick and top-10 prospect of the Mets.

Nido made his big league debut in September but, unlike most of his new teammates, did not return home for good at season's end. Instead, Nido traveled onward to the Arizona Fall League, appearing in 13 games at catcher for the Scottsdale Scorpions.

NEW YORK -- Though he spent many summers of his youth traveling to Florida for baseball leagues, Tomas Nido did not permanently move from Puerto Rico until his junior year of high school. It was there, at Orangewood Christian High School outside Orlando, that Nido developed into an eighth-round Draft pick and top-10 prospect of the Mets.

Nido made his big league debut in September but, unlike most of his new teammates, did not return home for good at season's end. Instead, Nido traveled onward to the Arizona Fall League, appearing in 13 games at catcher for the Scottsdale Scorpions.

"Baseball's a lot harder these days than it was back in high school, but being on the same team, you see how hard he works and how much he's dedicated to being the best player he can be," said David Thompson, Nido's roommate this summer at Double-A Binghamton. "I love Tomas. I think everybody does."

Video: Nido discusses improving during Arizona Fall League

It was one year ago when Nido made his most significant jump as a professional, batting .320 with seven home runs and an .816 OPS in 90 games for Class A Advanced St. Lucie. That earned Nido a promotion to Binghamton, a spot in the 2017 SiriusXM Futures Game in Miami and an invitation to the AFL, typically the haunt of some of baseball's best prospects.

Although Nido took a step back offensively in 2017, posting a .641 OPS in Binghamton and a .577 mark for the Scorpions, he has earned accolades for his throwing and receiving skills.

"He made a lot of good adjustments last year, and I think he's still adjusting," Mets director of player development Ian Levin said earlier this year. "Double-A is a more difficult level. It's a big jump going from [Class] A ball to Double-A, and he has definitely shown signs that he can be a very good Major League player. He's still going through his development process."

Video: WEST@EAST: Nido pops quick to nab Acuna at second

Nido isn't likely to make the Mets out of Spring Training, with Travis d'Arnaud and Kevin Plawecki penciled in as the team's primary catchers. But with a strong spring, he could position himself to be a significant contributor at some point next summer -- particularly considering d'Arnaud's injury history and Plawecki's inconsistencies.

For now, Nido can at least fall back on his brief Major League experience, which included a 3-for-10 performance in five games (two starts) down the stretch for the Mets.

"I think the first two or three days, it really didn't sink in," Nido said. "I was still numb. Even when I got my first hit, I didn't even remember running to first base. It was everything I dreamed of and more. It was worth everything I did to get there."

Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2008. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo and Facebook.

New York Mets, Tomas Nido