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On The Move: Trades & Transactions

Broken toe sends Gordon to disabled list

Vogelbach recalled from Triple-A to fill roster spot for Mariners
MLB.com

The Mariners placed infielder-outfielder Dee Gordon to the 10-day disabled list, retroactive to Monday, with a fractured right toe and recalled infielder Daniel Vogelbach from Triple-A Tacoma.

Vogelbach is expected to be available for Tuesday night's game against the Athletics at Oakland Coliseum.

The Mariners placed infielder-outfielder Dee Gordon to the 10-day disabled list, retroactive to Monday, with a fractured right toe and recalled infielder Daniel Vogelbach from Triple-A Tacoma.

Vogelbach is expected to be available for Tuesday night's game against the Athletics at Oakland Coliseum.

In 24 games with the Rainiers this season, Vogelbach, 25, is hitting .301 (25-for-83) with seven doubles, nine home runs, 15 RBIs and 22 walks with only 10 strikeouts. He has an on-base percentage of .449 and is slugging .711 (1.159 OPS) in Tacoma. He hit .204 with 5 runs scored, 2 doubles, 2 home runs, 5 RBI, 2 HBP and 7 walks in 19 games with Seattle after opening the season on the Mariners' roster prior to being optioned to Tacoma on April 25.

Gordon, 30, is hitting .304 (with 25 runs, 10 doubles, 1 triple, 1 home run, 13 RBIs, 16 stolen bases and a .330 on-base percentage in 45 games this season. He leads the American League, and is second in the Majors, in steals, and is 10th in the AL in batting average. Over his past 20 games, he is hitting .337 (28-for-83) with 12 runs and 7 stolen bases. On Sunday, Gordon singled to lead off the 11th inning, stole second base and came around to score the winning run in Seattle's 3-2, walkoff win.

He originally injured his right great toe on May 9 in Toronto, and reinjured it in Sunday's game vs. Detroit.

Seattle Mariners, Gordon Beckham, Daniel Vogelbach

Twins promote prospect Nick Gordon to Triple-A

MLB.com

The Twins promoted their No. 4 prospect, Nick Gordon, to Triple-A Rochester on Tuesday. The 22-year-old middle infielder, son of former MLB pitcher Tom Gordon and brother of the Mariners' Dee Gordon, hit .333/.381/.525 with 10 doubles, three triples, five home runs and seven steals in 42 games for Double-A Chattanooga this season.

Gordon, ranked as the No. 76 prospect overall according to MLB Pipeline, has moved steadily through Minnesota's organization since being selected fifth overall in the 2014 Draft. In a full season at Double-A in 2017, he slashed .270/.341/.408 with nine homers and 13 steals in 122 games.

The Twins promoted their No. 4 prospect, Nick Gordon, to Triple-A Rochester on Tuesday. The 22-year-old middle infielder, son of former MLB pitcher Tom Gordon and brother of the Mariners' Dee Gordon, hit .333/.381/.525 with 10 doubles, three triples, five home runs and seven steals in 42 games for Double-A Chattanooga this season.

Gordon, ranked as the No. 76 prospect overall according to MLB Pipeline, has moved steadily through Minnesota's organization since being selected fifth overall in the 2014 Draft. In a full season at Double-A in 2017, he slashed .270/.341/.408 with nine homers and 13 steals in 122 games.

Manny Randhawa is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Follow him on Twitter at @MannyOnMLB.

Minnesota Twins

Twins designate RHP Hughes for assignment

Righty still owed roughly $22.5 million through next season
MLB.com

MINNEAPOLIS -- In a surprising move -- given that he's owed roughly $22.5 million through next season -- right-hander Phil Hughes was designated for assignment after the Twins' 4-2 win over the Tigers on Monday night.

The Twins recalled outfielder Ryan LaMarre from Triple-A Rochester on Tuesday in a corresponding move.

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MINNEAPOLIS -- In a surprising move -- given that he's owed roughly $22.5 million through next season -- right-hander Phil Hughes was designated for assignment after the Twins' 4-2 win over the Tigers on Monday night.

The Twins recalled outfielder Ryan LaMarre from Triple-A Rochester on Tuesday in a corresponding move.

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Hughes, who signed a five-year, $58 million extension after a breakout 2014 season with the Twins, struggled this season, getting moved to the bullpen following two subpar starts after beginning the year on the 10-day disabled list with an oblique strain. He posted a 6.75 ERA with eight strikeouts, five walks and four homers allowed in 12 innings. He had a 7.71 ERA in two starts and a 5.40 ERA in five relief appearances.

"I've been around Phil for a long time," Twins manager Paul Molitor said. "He's worked really hard. He's been through a lot physically. He's had to endure a lot of rehabs. We probably saw him at his best his first year over here. It's been a tough road for him since then. I thanked him for the effort that he's given me and the times he's taken the ball, and I hope something happens in a positive fashion for him moving forward."

Hughes, 31, is now no longer on the 25-man roster or the 40-man roster and within seven days of the transaction, Hughes must either be traded, released or placed on irrevocable outright waivers. Hughes, though, won't be claimed on waivers, as no team is likely to be interested in picking up the rest of his salary with the Twins expected to have to eat the rest of his contract.

Molitor admitted it was a tough decision for ownership and the front office because of Hughes' contract situation, but he wasn't pitching well enough to keep his roster spot, with Molitor comparing it to keeping a Rule 5 reliever on the roster.

"It was time as far as we were concerned," Molitor said. "That's not my part of the game, but it's a guaranteed contract through the end of next year."

Hughes, who originally signed with the Twins on a three-year, $24 million contract prior to '14, had a 3.52 ERA in 209 2/3 innings his first year in Minnesota, walking 16 batters in 32 starts to earn his extension. But it's been rough since then, as he's dealt with several injuries, including two surgeries to alleviate symptoms from thoracic outlet syndrome and knee surgery.

Rhett Bollinger has covered the Twins for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @RhettBollinger and Facebook.

Minnesota Twins, Phil Hughes

Astros release former top prospect Singleton

MLB.com

The Astros have released former top prospect Jon Singleton, the team announced Monday. The 26-year-old first baseman was drafted by the Phillies in the eighth round of the 2009 Draft out of Millikan High School in Long Beach, Calif. He was traded to the Astros in July 2011, and signed a five-year, $10 million extension in '14, announced the day before his MLB debut.

Prior to signing the extension, Singleton had been suspended twice for failed marijuana tests. In January of this year, he was suspended 100 games for a third positive test for a drug of abuse in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program

The Astros have released former top prospect Jon Singleton, the team announced Monday. The 26-year-old first baseman was drafted by the Phillies in the eighth round of the 2009 Draft out of Millikan High School in Long Beach, Calif. He was traded to the Astros in July 2011, and signed a five-year, $10 million extension in '14, announced the day before his MLB debut.

Prior to signing the extension, Singleton had been suspended twice for failed marijuana tests. In January of this year, he was suspended 100 games for a third positive test for a drug of abuse in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program

Singleton was the No. 3 prospect in the Astros' organization behind Mark Appel and Carlos Correa when he made his big league debut on June 3, 2014, according to MLB Pipeline. In 95 games that season, he slashed .168/.285/.335 with 13 home runs. He appeared in 19 games for Houston in '15, slashing .191/.328/.298 with one home run.

Singleton hit .205/.376/.397 with 18 homers in 117 games for Double-A Corpus Christi in 2017.

Houston Astros, Jon Singleton

Crew options Peralta with Anderson off DL

No. 9 prospect impressed over first MLB stint; Counsell talks Rays' reliever-as-starter strategy
MLB.com

MILWAUKEE -- Twenty-one-year-old Brewers pitching prospect Freddy Peralta returned to Triple-A Colorado Springs on Monday after the team activated Opening Day starter Chase Anderson from the 10-day disabled list to work against the D-backs.

Peralta's six walks in a no-decision against the Twins on Saturday showed he still has work to do. A 13-strikeout gem against the Rockies six days earlier showed he has the stuff to get big league hitters out.

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MILWAUKEE -- Twenty-one-year-old Brewers pitching prospect Freddy Peralta returned to Triple-A Colorado Springs on Monday after the team activated Opening Day starter Chase Anderson from the 10-day disabled list to work against the D-backs.

Peralta's six walks in a no-decision against the Twins on Saturday showed he still has work to do. A 13-strikeout gem against the Rockies six days earlier showed he has the stuff to get big league hitters out.

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"Going back down, he'll have all the confidence in the world knowing you can pitch at this level," said Brandon Woodruff, a teammate in both the Majors and Minors this season who experienced his own big league debut last year. "His first one was spectacular, and then you're going to have your lumps here. He'll be just fine. He's a good kid."

Peralta's demotion was not a surprise, since Anderson was ready to return from a DL stint (illness), and another member of the Opening Day rotation, Zach Davies, is due back later this week from a shoulder injury.

Video: MIL@COL: Peralta strikes out 13 over 5 2/3 in debut

Davies said he expects to start Thursday against the Mets, though the Brewers were not ready to make anything official until Davies, who made a Minor League rehab start on Saturday for Class A Wisconsin, cleared his between-starts bullpen session.

"Look, we're at a stage that when the guys come here, they're expected to help us win. That's what Freddy did," Brewers manager Craig Counsell said. "But you get all the other stuff out of the way, the butterflies, the nerves, the stuff you can't replicate anywhere else. He's comfortable with the guys, knows what to expect on his start day, has some feel of the lay of the land.

"But the big thing is he came here and helped us win two games. That's the main thing."

Peralta's 18 strikeouts in his first two Major League starts set a Brewers record. Thirteen of them came in 5 2/3 scoreless innings of his Mother's Day debut in Denver, when Peralta carried a no-hitter into the sixth inning with his family in the stands at Coors Field, watching him pitch professionally for the first time.

Video: Peralta joins MLB Tonight to discuss his MLB debut

The follow-up was not as sharp, as Peralta, whom MLB Pipeline ranks as Milwaukee's No. 9 prospect, walked the Twins' leadoff man in four of the five innings he took the mound. Peralta was charged with four earned runs on three hits with five strikeouts in four-plus innings.

"First game, for sure, should give him confidence. Second game, he needs to figure out what he did wrong," said catcher Manny Pina, who said the key was a lack of fastball command in blustery conditions at Target Field. "He'll be back here, for sure."

Pondering pitching
Counsell and the Brewers watched with some interest as the Rays tabbed veteran reliever Sergio Romo as their starting pitcher for back-to-back games against the Angels over the weekend.

Former Brewers general manager Doug Melvin floated a similar idea for years: Start one of your best relievers and pitch him an inning or two or three, then turn to an innings-eating "starter." The idea is to maximize your chances of grabbing a lead and taking control of how the manager deploys his pitching the rest of the game.

Cozart not a fan of Rays' reliever strategy

Video: Counsell on Romo making two consecutive starts

"I understand why they did it in this situation with the Angels' lineup," said Counsell. "They've been [creative] all year, too, and their thought process with it. I think it's a different way of saying, 'How can we get 27 outs?' That's the question they're asking, and they're trying to find the best way to get 27 outs. I appreciate that they're trying to answer the question in a different way, and they're trying to find a bit of an edge.

"Doug's talked about it for a long time. It presents different challenges in [the National League, where pitchers hit]. … It's a different question in our league I think, and there are still answers for it. We've talked about, but it's a more complicated question."

The Brewers did start short-stint relief pitchers for some games last August and September after Jimmy Nelson went down with a shoulder injury, but not on consecutive days.

Suter to start
Counsell tabbed Brent Suter to start what had been an open date on the schedule Wednesday against the D-backs and said Woodruff would be available out of the bullpen for the time being.

Woodruff, incidentally, turned heads in the clubhouse on Monday afternoon after he shaved off the long, red beard he'd been growing since 2016. He said he simply felt like a change.

"Everybody was freaking out, coming in here," Woodruff said with a laugh.

Adam McCalvy has covered the Brewers for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @AdamMcCalvy and like him on Facebook.

Milwaukee Brewers, Chase Anderson, Freddy Peralta

Asuaje sent down; lefty reliever Webb called up

Renfroe, Hedges take step forward in rehab in Triple-A
Special to MLB.com

WASHINGTON -- With the Padres turning to Robbie Erlin to start Monday's game against the Nationals, the team made a move to shore up the bullpen in his absence, calling up left-hander Tyler Webb from Triple-A El Paso and optioning infielder Carlos Asuaje to the Chihuahuas.

For Asuaje, the move to Triple-A is about getting him more at-bats. He's played in 43 games this season for the Padres, slashing .193/.256/.284 with two home runs and 13 RBIs.

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WASHINGTON -- With the Padres turning to Robbie Erlin to start Monday's game against the Nationals, the team made a move to shore up the bullpen in his absence, calling up left-hander Tyler Webb from Triple-A El Paso and optioning infielder Carlos Asuaje to the Chihuahuas.

For Asuaje, the move to Triple-A is about getting him more at-bats. He's played in 43 games this season for the Padres, slashing .193/.256/.284 with two home runs and 13 RBIs.

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"He's going to go down and do what we talked about -- play some third base, bounce around the field, continue to work on his versatility," Padres manager Andy Green said. "He's had quality at-bats in the last week and a half as he's been up, but opportunity has been dwindling just by roster composition. He's got to find his rhythm, and the best way to do that sometimes is to go play."

This will be Webb's second stint this season with the Padres, after the team claimed him off waivers from the Brewers in April. Webb (0-1, 8.10 ERA) made two appearances with San Diego, including a three-inning scoreless relief effort against the Dodgers on April 18. He was then optioned to Triple-A on April 20, where he registered a 1.38 ERA in 11 appearances.

"We've got Robbie Erlin going today, and we wanted to be sure we had coverage in the bullpen over the next number of days," Green said. "We anticipate Robbie being down the rest of this series, and just the ability to have another left-hander in the bullpen gives us a little bit more options."

Video: LAD@SD: Erlin gets Seager swinging

Renfroe, Hedges going nine
Outfielder Hunter Renfroe (right elbow) and catcher Austin Hedges (right elbow) were both scheduled to play a full game Monday at Triple-A El Paso, the next step in their rehab efforts.

Renfroe has missed 27 games after being placed on the disabled list on April 21, and while there has been some speculation that he could rejoin the club soon, Green wasn't ready to put a timetable on his return.

"We're watching and seeing how he responds," Green said. "We're waiting to see how he, 1. performs, and 2. how he feels. We want to make sure he's ready to go before he comes back. We don't have a date marked out when Hunter will return, and we want to see how he responds each and every day."

Hedges' injury wasn't considered as serious as Renfroe's, but the team is still taking a wait-and-see approach to his return, as Green has been pleased with A.J. Ellis and Raffy Lopez as his catchers.

"His injury wasn't as tough on him as Hunter's was, so in Austin's case, we want to get him playing well before we bring him back," Green said. "If he's playing well and looking good and responding from a health perspective, which I really don't have any doubts on him right now, I think he'd probably be back sooner rather than later."

Elliott Smith is a contributor to MLB.com based in Washington D.C.

San Diego Padres, Carlos Asuaje, Austin Hedges, Hunter Renfroe, Tyler Webb

Rangers recall Bush, designate Jepsen

MLB.com

ARLINGTON -- Right-handed reliever Matt Bush is back in the Major Leagues.

The Rangers recalled Bush from Triple-A Round Rock on Monday and designated veteran reliever Kevin Jepsen for assignment. Manager Jeff Banister said Bush will step into his previous role as a multi-inning bridge and late-inning reliever.

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ARLINGTON -- Right-handed reliever Matt Bush is back in the Major Leagues.

The Rangers recalled Bush from Triple-A Round Rock on Monday and designated veteran reliever Kevin Jepsen for assignment. Manager Jeff Banister said Bush will step into his previous role as a multi-inning bridge and late-inning reliever.

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He did just that on Monday, allowing two runs in 1 2/3 innings in the Rangers' 10-5 loss to the Yankees.

"All the reports on Matt Bush have been quality reports," Banister said. "Fastball velo has been good. Location, pitchability, he has been able to make adjustments. Throw the ball out of the strike zone, he is able to get back in the strike zone. Pitch efficiency has been outstanding."

Bush was optioned to Round Rock on April 25 after he posted a 3.97 ERA and a 1.50 WHIP in his first 13 appearances for the Rangers. He pitched in eight games at Round Rock and allowed two runs in nine innings on nine hits and four walks. He struck out 14.

Bush also closed out with 6 2/3 scoreless innings over his last six outings, striking out 12. That helped convince the Rangers he was ready to return.

"I went down there to get better, get more consistent," Bush said. "Just making a few adjustments, throwing more strikes. Being able to command all my pitches. Just not throwing enough strikes. I started throwing more strikes and had some consistent outings down there and got back here ready to go."

Bush said the time in Triple-A also helped him mentally. He was able to spend time with his friend and counselor Roy Silver and clear his head. The Rangers view it as a good sign that Bush went right to Round Rock when he was sent down rather than take the full 72 hours to report.

"I enjoyed it," Bush said. "Great atmosphere there. Great group of guys. Very loose, very relaxed. Had a good amount of time to work with Roy Silver, get back to some basics. Get a fresh start, get a clear mind. Kind of like I did when I first got called up [in 2015]."

Jepsen made the Rangers out of Spring Training and had a 1.69 ERA and a 0.94 WHIP through his first 11 games. But he had a 13.50 ERA and a 2.67 WHIP in his last 10 games as his command became erratic and he lost the effectiveness of his high fastball.

"I just know he came out of Spring Training throwing the ball well," Banister said. "I know he was working hard, but it was a situation where his high fastball got away from him. He still has quality stuff, but Matt was ready to come back and we had to make a decision. This was the decision that had to be made."

When a player's contract is designated for assignment -- often abbreviated "DFA" -- that player is immediately removed from his club's 40-man roster, and 25-man roster if he was on that as well. Within seven days of the transaction (it was previously 10 days), the player must either be traded, released or placed on irrevocable outright waivers.

Rangers beat

• Third baseman Adrian Beltre, on the disabled list with a strained left hamstring, is doing some baseball activities, but general manager Jon Daniels said, "He is making progress but not close. He is still a couple of weeks away."

• The Rangers are undecided on Thursday's starter against the Royals. Triple-A right-hander Austin Bibens-Dirkx appears to be a candidate since it is his day to pitch. The Rangers also have long reliever Jesse Chavez as a potential candidate as well as rookie Yohander Mendez, also at Round Rock.

• Utility player Drew Robinson has been activated off the disabled list and optioned to Round Rock. He had been sidelined since May 5 with a strained left hip.

T.R. Sullivan has covered the Rangers since 1989, and for MLB.com since 2006. Follow him on Twitter @Sullivan_Ranger and listen to his podcast.

Texas Rangers, Matt Bush

Tribe calls up veteran outfielder Cabrera

Righty reliever Marshall optioned to Triple-A Columbus
MLB.com

HOUSTON -- The Indians added outfield depth to their roster, calling up veteran Melky Cabrera on Sunday. The 33-year-old Cabrera, who signed a Minor League contract with the Indians in late April, was slated to start in right field and bat sixth in the series finale against the Astros at Minute Maid Park.

In a corresponding move, the Indians optioned right-handed reliever Evan Marshall to Triple-A Columbus, and to make room for Cabrera on the club's 40-man roster, right-hander Alexi Ogando was designated for assignment.

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HOUSTON -- The Indians added outfield depth to their roster, calling up veteran Melky Cabrera on Sunday. The 33-year-old Cabrera, who signed a Minor League contract with the Indians in late April, was slated to start in right field and bat sixth in the series finale against the Astros at Minute Maid Park.

In a corresponding move, the Indians optioned right-handed reliever Evan Marshall to Triple-A Columbus, and to make room for Cabrera on the club's 40-man roster, right-hander Alexi Ogando was designated for assignment.

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The switch-hitting Cabrera spent a little over a week in extended spring training when he first signed before moving to Columbus, where he logged 12 hits in 42 at-bats.

"We've been talking about the need," manager Terry Francona said. "I just think we wanted to give Melky enough time to have a chance to be Melky. I don't think it's fair to anybody, just because you have a need, to call anybody up prematurely. By all accounts, he's done a really good job. He's worked hard. He's got himself in good shape."

Video: CLE@HOU: Cabrera fires strong throw to nab Bregman

The Indians are familiar with Cabrera, a veteran of 13 Major League seasons. He played for two teams in the Indians' division last year, compiling a .285 average with 17 homers and 85 RBIs over 156 games for the White Sox and Royals.

"It'll be nice because now I can finally root for him not to make outs," Francona said. 

Cabrera was one of many established big leaguers who found themselves without contracts when Spring Training began. Cabrera said he did not participate in the free-agent camp that was coordinated by the Players Association to help job-seekers get into playing shape.

He finalized a Minor League deal with the Indians on May 1.

"It was a little bit weird at that time, because I'm so used to having a contract in place and being ready for Spring Training," Cabrera said through interpreter William Clements. "I was able to keep working, just as I always would, throughout that time. I'm thankful the Indians have given me the opportunity."

Because of injuries, the Indians are lacking depth in their outfield. Tyler Naquin has been on the disabled list since May 12 with a left hamstring strain, while Bradley Zimmer has been sidelined more than a week with a left rib contusion. Lonnie Chisenhall, out since early April with a right calf strain, is beginning a rehab assignment on Monday.

"One day at a time," Francona said. "We don't know exactly when guys are coming back. We'll see how it goes."

Miller improving
A stiff back prevented lefty reliever Andrew Miller from pitching on Saturday, but he felt confident he would be available for the Tribe's series finale with Houston Sunday.

Miller didn't pitch, but Francona said after the Indians' 3-1 loss that had they tied the game or moved ahead, he would have called on the left-hander.

Francona consulted pitching coach Carl Willis before the game to get his recommendation on how to handle Miller.

"I said, 'Would it be better for him to pitch, or not?'" Francona said. "He said, 'Probably not, unless we had a chance to win.' We stayed away."

Hours before first pitch, Miller threw on the side and felt no lingering issues from the back stiffness that sidelined him on Saturday.

"I'm not really worried about it," he said. "Maybe try to sit with better posture."

Alyson Footer is a national correspondent for MLB.com. Follow her on Twitter @alysonfooter.

Cleveland Indians, Melky Cabrera

Yanks option Frazier, recall righty Gallegos

MLB.com

The Yankees optioned outfielder Clint Frazier back to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on Sunday following their 10-1 win over the Royals. On Monday, the club recalled right-hander Giovanny Gallegos from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

Frazier logged his first big league game of 2018 on Saturday following a prolonged absence with concussion symptoms, going 1-for-2 with a double and two walks out of the No. 7 spot as New York's designated hitter. He did not appear in Sunday's series finale at Kauffman Stadium.

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The Yankees optioned outfielder Clint Frazier back to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on Sunday following their 10-1 win over the Royals. On Monday, the club recalled right-hander Giovanny Gallegos from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

Frazier logged his first big league game of 2018 on Saturday following a prolonged absence with concussion symptoms, going 1-for-2 with a double and two walks out of the No. 7 spot as New York's designated hitter. He did not appear in Sunday's series finale at Kauffman Stadium.

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This will be Gallegos' first time up this season. In 2017, he went 0-1 with a 4.87 ERA in 16 appearances out of the bullpen.

Frazier sustained the concussion when he made a leaping catch against the wall in a Spring Training game against the Pirates on Feb. 26. He hit .362 with three doubles, two triples and three homers over a 12-game span in Triple-A before his weekend callup. Yankees manager Aaron Boone was impressed by Frazier's one-off performance on Saturday.

"He has earned this opportunity," Boone said of Frazier. "He has played well, swung the bat really well. I know what he is capable of and just want him to go out there and let his talent take over."

Matt Kelly is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @mattkellyMLB.

New York Yankees, Clint Frazier

Astros place Fisher on 10-day DL, recall Davis

MLB.com

HOUSTON -- The Astros placed outfielder Derek Fisher on the 10-day disabled list on Sunday with gastrointestinal discomfort, retroactive to Saturday. In a corresponding move prior to the series finale against the Indians, the club recalled J.D. Davis from Triple-A Fresno to replace Fisher on the 25-man roster.

Unsure of the specifics, Fisher said he had a poor "reaction to something" days before Sunday. Fisher will see a specialist Monday for clarity on the digestive issue after being unable to eat properly or normally before hitting the DL, a stint he doesn't expect to last long.

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HOUSTON -- The Astros placed outfielder Derek Fisher on the 10-day disabled list on Sunday with gastrointestinal discomfort, retroactive to Saturday. In a corresponding move prior to the series finale against the Indians, the club recalled J.D. Davis from Triple-A Fresno to replace Fisher on the 25-man roster.

Unsure of the specifics, Fisher said he had a poor "reaction to something" days before Sunday. Fisher will see a specialist Monday for clarity on the digestive issue after being unable to eat properly or normally before hitting the DL, a stint he doesn't expect to last long.

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"Obviously, if you're not eating, it's going to do a lot of things to you," Fisher said. "It's going to do everything to you. Obviously, with as much as we're working here and as much as we're on the field, and obviously, playing every day is something you've got to be fueled for. And if you're not, you can't be there to help.

"This is something pretty new to me," the outfielder added. "And I feel like it's going to be something I'm going to be able to bounce back from pretty quick."

Fisher, who has made 17 starts in left field, was batting .176 and has 37 strikeouts in 74 at-bats before being placed on the DL, including striking out twice and walking once in Friday's series opener against the Indians.

Video: HOU@OAK: Fisher goes back-to-back, hits go-ahead jack

"Even the day he played, he wasn't completely feeling great and had some digestive issues and was starting to lose a little bit of weight," said Astros manager AJ Hinch. "We had him see our doctors. We got him some medication and it still didn't resolve itself. We felt like we needed to get him a little more extensive tests over the next couple days and play with a full roster."

In 33 games with Fresno since being sent down in mid-April, Davis posted a .415/.473/.654 slash line. His .415 batting average was the highest among all Triple-A players. A traditional infielder with limited outfield experience, Davis batted .250 in 24 at-bats during a nine-game stint with the Astros from Opening Day through April 11.

"J.D.'s obviously put himself in a nice position to come up and contribute," Hinch said. "He swung the bat extremely well in Triple-A. … We'll incorporate him as much as we can. I have the debate every day about what to do in left field and what to do at [designated hitter]. Those are two spots that I'm going to take a look at. He may see some time at first base as well. It just depends on how it's all configured."

Video: HOU@MIN: Davis drives in Correa with an RBI single

Davis, who Hinch said could start Tuesday against the Giants, completed Fresno's third cycle in 21 seasons Thursday, briefly raising his batting average to .425. Davis' 17 doubles in the Pacific Coast League play are tied for first.

Davis, who has never started a Major League game in left field, made nine appearances (five starts) at first base earlier this season and 22 appearances at third base in 2017.

"One day, you know, you take ground balls at third," Davis said. "One day you take fly balls out in left and then you take ground balls at first the next day.

"I'm not a fish out of the water out there," Davis said of playing left. "I feel pretty comfortable out there."

Injury note
• Right fielder Josh Reddick returned to the Astros' lineup Sunday. Reddick was scratched from Friday's game with a skin infection near his left knee. He did not start Saturday, but reported a pain-free appearance after he pinch-hit in Saturday's ninth inning.

Christian Boutwell is a reporter for MLB.com based in Houston.

Houston Astros, J.D. Davis, Derek Fisher

Braves release Bautista; Camargo to play third

MLB.com

ATLANTA -- Once Saturday afternoon's staff meeting led to the decision to have Johan Camargo serve as the Braves' everyday third baseman, general manager Alex Anthopoulos approached Jose Bautista and came to the agreement it was best to end what proved to be just a two-week experiment.

Before Sunday afternoon's game against the Marlins, Anthopoulous revealed that Bautista has been released and can attempt to extend his career elsewhere. The 37-year-old spent the past two weeks creating regular reminders he is not close to what he was when he won consecutive American League Hank Aaron Awards, earned six All-Star selections and had four top-10 finishes in MVP balloting.

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ATLANTA -- Once Saturday afternoon's staff meeting led to the decision to have Johan Camargo serve as the Braves' everyday third baseman, general manager Alex Anthopoulos approached Jose Bautista and came to the agreement it was best to end what proved to be just a two-week experiment.

Before Sunday afternoon's game against the Marlins, Anthopoulous revealed that Bautista has been released and can attempt to extend his career elsewhere. The 37-year-old spent the past two weeks creating regular reminders he is not close to what he was when he won consecutive American League Hank Aaron Awards, earned six All-Star selections and had four top-10 finishes in MVP balloting.

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Now that shortstop Dansby Swanson is back from the disabled list and Camargo has a chance to play third base on an everyday basis, the Braves simply couldn't afford to provide Bautista the regular opportunities he needs to prove he might still have something left to offer.

"We agreed if there's not going to be playing time and there's not going to be at-bats here, that's not right for him," Anthopoulos said. "He needed to get going. We just agreed it was best to give him that chance to get that playing time."

Video: ATL@CHC: Bautista's towering homer hangs for 6.5 sec

This wasn't necessarily an enjoyable responsibility for Anthopoulos, who developed a strong friendship with Bautista when he served as his GM in Toronto. But as is the case with most decisions he and his peers make, it was best to remove any emotional attachment from the equation and look at the reality that the once-feared slugger hit .143 (5-for-35) with two home runs and 12 strikeouts since joining Atlanta on May 4.

"This is about the Braves at all times," Anthopoulous said. "I think everybody understands that."

After Bautista remained unsigned throughout Spring Training, Anthopoulos took a chance by giving him a Minor League contract in April with the understanding he would need to play third base, a position he had not manned on an everyday basis for more than a decade.

As expected, Bautista's range was limited. More importantly, his bat didn't come close to compensating for his defensive limitations at the hot corner. The former Blue Jays outfielder has batted .136 with a .522 OPS against right-handed pitchers since last year's All-Star break. The tremendous power he once had was not witnessed, as he produced a 100-plus mph exit velocity with just five of the 23 balls put in play for Atlanta.

"We took a shot," Anthopoulos said. "There was a lot of upside for us if it clicked. We felt that was the reward at the end of it, but we certainly didn't feel like there was any downside."

Video: MIA@ATL: Camargo plates Suzuki with a single to right

Now, the Braves will turn to Camargo, who is arguably the best defensive infielder within the entire organization. The slick-fielding switch-hitter was projected to be Atlanta's everyday third baseman until he missed the final two weeks of Spring Training with an oblique strain that sidelined him through April's first couple of weeks. This led to the signing of Ryan Flaherty a few days before Opening Day.

When Camargo returned from the DL, Flaherty remained a fixture at third base, primarily because he ranked among the league leaders in batting average throughout April. Bautista then arrived the same day that Swanson's move to the DL led Camargo to spend two weeks as Atlanta's shortstop.

"Everything happens for a reason," Camargo said. "God has a plan, and I think [my injury in Spring Training] was another trial, another test for me to kind of go through, and now this is the moment we are in right now and just kind of move forward."

Video: ATL@DET: Riley hits a two-run homer in the 6th

With highly touted prospect Austin Riley (No. 8 per MLB Pipeline) now with Triple-A Gwinnett and one step away from beginning his potential tenure as Atlanta's third baseman of the future, there might be a point this season or next when Camargo returns to a utility role. But for now, the third-base job is rightfully his.

"Obviously, we're high on [Riley] and excited about him," Anthopoulos said. "He'll tell us when he's ready. If he performs and gets hot, that's a good problem to have. You can never have too many good players. If Austin can show us he's ready, we'd love to be in that spot where we have a tough decision to make."

Mark Bowman has covered the Braves for MLB.com since 2001.

Atlanta Braves, Jose Bautista

Frazier needs rehab assignment before return

Flexen, Nido recalled; Baumann optioned to Triple-A; Lobaton DFA'd
Special to MLB.com

NEW YORK -- Mets third baseman Todd Frazier said on Saturday that he will need to go on a Minor League rehab assignment before he is ready to return from the 10-day disabled list, and he isn't sure when he will be ready to start one. Frazier has been on the shelf since May 8 with a strained left hamstring.

"If I gave you a timestamp, I'd be lying to you. We're taking it day by day," Frazier said before the Mets faced the D-backs at Citi Field. "It's just one of those things that I've never had it before. It's a mild strain and it takes some time to heal. So we want to be 100 percent. I'd rather lose two more weeks -- if that's the case -- than two more months, if you know what I mean."

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NEW YORK -- Mets third baseman Todd Frazier said on Saturday that he will need to go on a Minor League rehab assignment before he is ready to return from the 10-day disabled list, and he isn't sure when he will be ready to start one. Frazier has been on the shelf since May 8 with a strained left hamstring.

"If I gave you a timestamp, I'd be lying to you. We're taking it day by day," Frazier said before the Mets faced the D-backs at Citi Field. "It's just one of those things that I've never had it before. It's a mild strain and it takes some time to heal. So we want to be 100 percent. I'd rather lose two more weeks -- if that's the case -- than two more months, if you know what I mean."

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He added that the rehab assignment is not going to be at Triple-A Las Vegas, but "somewhere closer for sure."

Frazier has done all manner of baseball activities but still feels it when he runs.

"Just running," he said. "I hit today and felt really good. I'm doing everything I'm supposed to do: hitting, fielding. I haven't fielded in a couple of days, but that doesn't bother me at all either."

Jose Reyes has had several hamstring injuries during his career and has spoken with Frazier about the pitfalls of rushing back. Frazier said pushing it "could be detrimental."

"We were running earlier and he told me, 'I don't know if that's a good idea just yet,'" Frazier said, "and he was right."

Frazier first felt something in his hamstring a month ago while running the bases. He said it was "about three weeks" that he tried to play with it, but when he went to field a ground ball in Cincinnati on May 7 it grabbed.

"It's a slow process and it's frustrating because I want to get out there," he said. "But it's one of those things where you have to take your time."

Roster moves
The Mets on Saturday recalled right-hander Chris Flexen and catcher Tomas Nido from Triple-A Las Vegas, optioned lefty Buddy Baumann to Las Vegas and designated catcher Jose Lobaton for assignment. Manager Mickey Callaway said the club made the move because "we wanted to get another look at Nido" and the organization likes the idea of exposing him to recently acquired Devin Mesoraco.

"We have a catcher in Mesoraco who prepares the right way. He does a tremendous job of it," Callaway said. "When you're in Triple-A, it's really tough to simulate what you have to go through in the big leagues. We sat down with Nido today, and he's going to really pay attention to what Mesoraco is doing and learn how to prepare the right way."

Roger Rubin is a contributor to MLB.com based in New York.

New York Mets, Buddy Baumann, Chris Flexen, Todd Frazier, Jose Lobaton, Tomas Nido

J-Hay collects 3 hits in return from DL

Harrison singles in 1st AB, doubles, hits sac fly; Kingham optioned to Triple-A
MLB.com

PITTSBURGH -- The Pirates' sparkplug second baseman is back.

The Bucs activated Josh Harrison from the 10-day disabled list before their 8-5 loss to the Padres at PNC Park on Sunday. To make room for Harrison on the roster, Pittsburgh optioned right-hander Nick Kingham to Triple-A Indianapolis.

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PITTSBURGH -- The Pirates' sparkplug second baseman is back.

The Bucs activated Josh Harrison from the 10-day disabled list before their 8-5 loss to the Padres at PNC Park on Sunday. To make room for Harrison on the roster, Pittsburgh optioned right-hander Nick Kingham to Triple-A Indianapolis.

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Harrison made an instant impact in the leadoff spot, going 3-for-4 with a double and a go-ahead sacrifice fly in the eighth inning before the Pirates unraveled in the ninth. Suffice it to say he was ready to get back on the field after five weeks away.

"Oh, it sucked. But that's the past," Harrison said, smiling. "We're here now. Glad to be back."

Video: SD@PIT: Harrison ruled safe at first after challenge

Harrison had been sidelined since April 15 by a fractured left hand, which he sustained when he was hit by a Jose Urena fastball at Marlins Park. The Pirates went 15-15 during his absence -- using Adam Frazier, Sean Rodriguez and Max Moroff at second base, while experimenting with a number of different leadoff hitters.

Harrison hit .263/.328/.351 with a home run and five RBIs in 14 games before the injury. After a brief Minor League rehab assignment with Double-A Altoona, he rejoined the Pirates at PNC Park on Saturday.

"He's one of our best players," Pirates manager Clint Hurdle said. "He helps us on both sides of the ball. He helps us in the clubhouse. He helps us in everything we do."

Video: SD@PIT: Harrison puts Bucs ahead in 8th with sac fly

Sending out Kingham was not an easy decision for the Pirates, especially after he showed his stuff and resiliency in a quality start against the Padres on Saturday night. Kingham carried a perfect game into the seventh inning of his Major League debut on April 29, earning another start and beat the Brewers in Milwaukee on May 4. Kingham went to Triple-A and down to Double-A to stay in line for Saturday's spot start, only to be optioned back to Indianapolis.

"Nick continues to be very professional in everything that he does and everything that he touches. He understands the roster, the way it's set up to work right now," Hurdle said. "Obviously he's done everything he can do to keep himself fresh in our minds as we move forward. Whether there's injury, performance, whatever it might be, he's shown the ability to pitch at this level."

The Pirates will fill Kingham's spot in the rotation with right-hander Joe Musgrove, who is scheduled to come off the disabled list and join Pittsburgh's staff Friday against the Cardinals at PNC Park. Musgrove has not pitched for the Bucs this season due to a muscle strain in his right shoulder, so this will be the first time the Pirates see the rotation they envisioned entering Spring Training.

Video: SD@PIT: Kingham strikes out Hosmer swinging

"He's put in the work. He's to that point where he's ready to go," Hurdle said. "He put himself in the best position that he can be in to have success when he goes out there for the team. I look forward to that as well."

To make room for Musgrove, the Pirates will have to make another move in the coming days. With Harrison back and Kingham sent down, they are carrying a five-man bench and an eight-man bullpen to complement their four-man rotation. When Musgrove returns, they could drop a reliever or use a short bench as they did earlier this season.

"The comfort at this point is still 13 pitchers overall, eight relievers. That may change as we get Musgrove active," general manager Neal Huntington said. "That may change a week or two weeks after Musgrove gets active. There's a lot of baseball to play between now and then."

Around the horn
• Center fielder Starling Marte (right oblique strain) said Sunday he is feeling better but not yet taking part in any baseball activities. Marte noted that his injury is not as painful as the one he endured in 2012 and agreed with Hurdle's assessment that it won't require a long stay on the disabled list.

"I believe we're going to be able to bounce back right away," Marte said through interpreter Mike Gonzalez. "I just need to continue to work with my trainers, submit to them and what they have in store for me, and I should be back as soon as possible."

• Infielder Jung Ho Kang has played in three extended spring camp games in Bradenton, Fla., Huntington said. Kang recently progressed to playing seven innings after a pair of five-inning appearances. Kang homered in his last game, Huntington said. He is playing third base in games and doing pregame work at shortstop.

"He continues to do everything that he can do to get back to being the best player that he's going to be," Huntington said. "He's been fine. At times he shows that he hasn't played competitively, other than a short stint in the Dominican Republic, in a long time. And at times he shows that he can still hit a ball and still play the game."

Adam Berry has covered the Pirates for MLB.com since 2015. Follow him on Twitter and Facebook and read his blog.

Pittsburgh Pirates, Josh Harrison, Joe Musgrove