Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon

news

MLB News

Dancing with the Horror

It was a stumble that was heard 'round the world.

It was like the Fall of the Galactic Empire. The loss by the Pats in Super Bowl XLIV. The Russians falling against the U.S. hockey team in Lake Placid. Suffice it to say, it was a stumble that was heard round the world. Kirstie Alley, darling of Dancing with the Stars, and her partner Maksim Chmerkovskiy had a momentary lack of coordination during their rumba in Monday night's episode. While dancing gracefully to "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" (I didn't realize Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg wrote rumba numbers), Maksim attempted a dramatic technique with the bubbly, yet voluptuous Kirstie, and in doing so lost his balance, and both went down.

Shock! Dismay! Embarrassment! The couple did, however, continue the performance, eventually earning a respectable 21/30 from the judges. A gift score? Probably, but you have to reward the pair for remembering that age old show business mantra, "The show must go on."

Now, how does this relate to baseball, you ask? Actually there is a very current situation that, in my humble opinion, is almost identical to the Kirstie/Maksim horror of Monday evening.

Can you think of any situation in baseball where one man was asked to shoulder an unrealistic load? How about a guy who was asked to perform under circumstances that were, perhaps, a bit larger than normal? If we were to, hypothetically of course, cast Maksim Chmerkovskiy in the role of Adrian Gonzalez and Kirstie Alley in the role of, say, PETCO Park, could we not draw some comparisons between the two situations? One man asked to support the weight of the world, expected to always come up with the game-winning hit or the home run that breaks the tie, all the while playing in a stadium that is just too large to really be effective in. Eventually, his patience breaks, and he ends up on the Red Sox.

All I'm saying is, I wouldn't be surprised if Maksim Chmerkovskiy is playing shortstop for Boston by the middle of next week.

It was like the Fall of the Galactic Empire. The loss by the Pats in Super Bowl XLIV. The Russians falling against the U.S. hockey team in Lake Placid. Suffice it to say, it was a stumble that was heard round the world. Kirstie Alley, darling of Dancing with the Stars, and her partner Maksim Chmerkovskiy had a momentary lack of coordination during their rumba in Monday night's episode. While dancing gracefully to "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" (I didn't realize Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg wrote rumba numbers), Maksim attempted a dramatic technique with the bubbly, yet voluptuous Kirstie, and in doing so lost his balance, and both went down.

Shock! Dismay! Embarrassment! The couple did, however, continue the performance, eventually earning a respectable 21/30 from the judges. A gift score? Probably, but you have to reward the pair for remembering that age old show business mantra, "The show must go on."

Now, how does this relate to baseball, you ask? Actually there is a very current situation that, in my humble opinion, is almost identical to the Kirstie/Maksim horror of Monday evening.

Can you think of any situation in baseball where one man was asked to shoulder an unrealistic load? How about a guy who was asked to perform under circumstances that were, perhaps, a bit larger than normal? If we were to, hypothetically of course, cast Maksim Chmerkovskiy in the role of Adrian Gonzalez and Kirstie Alley in the role of, say, PETCO Park, could we not draw some comparisons between the two situations? One man asked to support the weight of the world, expected to always come up with the game-winning hit or the home run that breaks the tie, all the while playing in a stadium that is just too large to really be effective in. Eventually, his patience breaks, and he ends up on the Red Sox.

All I'm saying is, I wouldn't be surprised if Maksim Chmerkovskiy is playing shortstop for Boston by the middle of next week.