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Escobar feels lucky to avoid injury after HBP

Royals shortstop plunked on left wrist during Monday's loss
MLB.com @FlannyMLB

KANSAS CITY -- When Tigers right-hander Jordan Zimmermann hit Royals shortstop Alcides Escobar in the left wrist with a 90-mph fastball on Monday night, Escobar for a moment thought his season was over.

"When it hit me, I told [trainer] Nick [Kenney], 'I broke my [wrist]. I can't move my hand,'" Escobar said.

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KANSAS CITY -- When Tigers right-hander Jordan Zimmermann hit Royals shortstop Alcides Escobar in the left wrist with a 90-mph fastball on Monday night, Escobar for a moment thought his season was over.

"When it hit me, I told [trainer] Nick [Kenney], 'I broke my [wrist]. I can't move my hand,'" Escobar said.

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Escobar said his entire hand felt numb. But as Kenney walked with Escobar up the dugout stairs and toward the Royals' clubhouse a few minutes later, Escobar suddenly started squeezing his left hand and shaking it.

Escobar turned to Kenney and said, "I'm good."

And just like that, Escobar was back in the starting lineup a day later on Tuesday, his 263rd consecutive start, extending his club record.

Teammate Jason Vargas jokes that Escobar is like a shark -- all cartilage and no bones, therefore nothing can get broken.

Royals manager Ned Yost concurs, saying, "Esky just has a unique body. He doesn't break down."

Escobar said before Tuesday's game that he had no intention of missing any time.

"I'm feeling good," Escobar said. "Just a little bruise and pain. Nothing broke. I'm just getting treatment. I can do everything."

Escobar considers himself very fortunate.

"Oh yeah. I looked at replay last night and thought, 'Oh, wow. I'm lucky,'" he said.

Yost no doubt breathed a sigh of relief, too. He calls Escobar as hot a hitter as he has on the team. Escobar entered Tuesday hitting .347 since June 10, and he had raised his average over 50 points to .233.

"And he did that after he already had 200 at-bats -- that's hard to do," Yost said.

Escobar has been working diligently with hitting coach Dale Sveum, especially on pitch selection.

"I'm swinging more at strikes than balls," Escobar said. "Before I was struggling because I was swinging at balls. But swinging at strikes, that's the key."

Jeffrey Flanagan has covered the Royals since 1991, and for MLB.com since 2015. Follow him on Twitter @FlannyMLB.

Kansas City Royals, Alcides Escobar