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Meyer joins Nolan in elite Angels club

MLB.com @mi_guardado

ANAHEIM -- Alex Meyer made history during the Angels' improbable 3-2 win over the Dodgers on Wednesday night.

The Halos' rookie became the fourth pitcher in club history to fire back-to-back home starts in which he threw six-plus innings while holding opponents to two or fewer hits, joining Nolan Ryan, Kirk McCaskill and Dan Haren.

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ANAHEIM -- Alex Meyer made history during the Angels' improbable 3-2 win over the Dodgers on Wednesday night.

The Halos' rookie became the fourth pitcher in club history to fire back-to-back home starts in which he threw six-plus innings while holding opponents to two or fewer hits, joining Nolan Ryan, Kirk McCaskill and Dan Haren.

View Full Game Coverage

Though while the final tally will show Meyer tossing six innings of one-hit ball against a homer-happy Dodgers on 99 pitches, nothing came easy. A battle with command put Meyer's night in early jeopardy, and through just three innings, his pitch count had reached 68, thanks in large part to a season-high five walks.

"Alex was on the edge early," Angels manager Mike Scioscia said. "He struggled. That was an extreme effort to get through six innings."

Video: LAD@LAA: Scioscia talks about the walk-off win

"I came in after the first couple innings, I was pretty mad at myself because it's kind of the same thing," Meyer said. "Every time I get in trouble, a lot of it's because of me, with walks specifically."

Despite the early issues, Meyer found his rhythm. A Yasmani Grandal leadoff single in the fourth preceded eight straight retired batters on a tidy 31 pitches.

Through four starts at Angel Stadium this season, the 27-year-old is 2-0 with a 1.65 ERA (six runs allowed across 32 2/3 innings).

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said his offense put together quality at-bats against Meyer through the first three innings before he noticeably settled in.

"I thought we had a very good plan," said Roberts, "but couldn't get that big hit when we needed to."

Meyer attributed his resolve to his teammates and coaching staff, who didn't find fault with his high walk rate. Upon exiting, the 6-foot-9, 225-pounder expressed his frustration to reliever Cam Bedrosian, saying if he had thrown more strikes early on in the contest, he'd have pitched beyond six innings.

Nonetheless, Scioscia said he felt Meyer put the Angels in a position to win.

"The chances of him finishing six innings after his first two innings going into the third were slim to none," Scioscia said. "But he found his release point and finished strong through the sixth and gave us a chance to win, obviously.

"That's all you can ask for."

Meyer concurred.

"Definitely didn't make it easy on myself," he said. "Same issues as before -- a lot self-inflicted. But luckily, I was able to get out of it and buckle down when I really had to.

"We were able to get the win, and that's all that really matters."

Kaelen Jones is a reporter for MLB.com based in Los Angeles.

Los Angeles Angels, Alex Meyer