Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon

news

MLB News

For d'Arnaud's dad, every day is Father's Day

MLB.com @mlbbowman

ATLANTA -- Lance d'Arnaud never sought anything more than the opportunity to coach his sons at the Little League level. But nearly two decades after being enriched by this experience, he stands as one of the few fathers who can proudly lay claim to having two sons playing at the Major League level.

d'Arnaud spent last October watching his youngest son, Travis, help the Mets reach the World Series. Over the past month, he has seen his oldest son, Chase, establishing himself as an everyday member of the Braves' lineup and provide hope that he's distanced himself from the need to experience any more long stretches at the Minor League level.

ATLANTA -- Lance d'Arnaud never sought anything more than the opportunity to coach his sons at the Little League level. But nearly two decades after being enriched by this experience, he stands as one of the few fathers who can proudly lay claim to having two sons playing at the Major League level.

d'Arnaud spent last October watching his youngest son, Travis, help the Mets reach the World Series. Over the past month, he has seen his oldest son, Chase, establishing himself as an everyday member of the Braves' lineup and provide hope that he's distanced himself from the need to experience any more long stretches at the Minor League level.

:: Father's Day 2016 ::

Unfortunately, Travis will not return from a shoulder injury in time to give his dad a chance to spend Sunday soaking in a Father's Day treat of seeing his two sons compete against each other at Citi Field.

"It would be perfect to see them on the Father's Day, but every day is Father's Day this year," Lance d'Arnaud said. "It's been a great year."

The proud father wore a white jersey emblazoned with both a Phillies logo and a Mets logo when his two sons competed against each other as big leaguers for the first time in September. Over the course of the month that followed, he and Chase attended nearly every postseason game Travis competed in with the Mets.

This year, it has been Chase's turn to grab most of the spotlight.

"I wouldn't be here if it weren't for my father," Chase d'Arnaud said. "He's the best dad there is. He coached me throughout Little League. Fortunately, we got to a point where my other coaches knew more than he did because he only played through Little League. But I'm very happy to have him in my life."

As his younger brother has spent most of this season on the disabled list, Chase d'Arnaud has shown he still has some of those same skills he possessed when he was once considered one of the Pirates' top prospects. A couple ill-timed injuries have clouded some of that promise. But the 29-year-old infielder has made the most of the opportunity he's gained since being called up to Atlanta in early May.

"I'm just elated he has found a good home here with the Braves," Lance d'Arnaud said. "He had a chance to get a lot of extra seasoning in the Minor Leagues and it's all paying off right now."

Nearly 20 years since last coaching a team that included both Chase and Travis, Lance d'Arnaud can be found riding around Long Beach (Calif.) on his Harley Davidson Road King, which includes a license plate that simply reads, "The Bigs."

"My dad is very positive," Chase said. "He treats everybody the same with love and respect. Travis and I adopted that. It makes life a lot more enjoyable when you can enjoy the company of others around you."

Mark Bowman has covered the Braves for MLB.com since 2001.

Atlanta Braves, Chase D'Arnaud