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Where's the hair? Straily talks shave, rebuild

Right-hander: 'Guys are kind of curious of what our team is going to look like'
MLB.com @JoeFrisaro

MIAMI -- All the offseason moves mean the Marlins will have plenty of new faces in the clubhouse when Spring Training opens in February. It also may take a second or two to recognize a familiar face, because right-hander Dan Straily has shaved his previously full, red beard.

A guest Tuesday on MLB Network Radio's "Power Alley," Straily addressed his clean-shaven look as well as the Marlins' new organizational direction.

MIAMI -- All the offseason moves mean the Marlins will have plenty of new faces in the clubhouse when Spring Training opens in February. It also may take a second or two to recognize a familiar face, because right-hander Dan Straily has shaved his previously full, red beard.

A guest Tuesday on MLB Network Radio's "Power Alley," Straily addressed his clean-shaven look as well as the Marlins' new organizational direction.

First, the beard. Straily had grown it out since the 2017 season ended. His wife had other ideas.

"I was politely invited by my wife to shave before for some pictures come up here pretty soon," Straily told radio hosts Mike Ferrin and Jim Duquette.

The Marlins allowed facial hair last year, as long as it was groomed. The organization is under new ownership, and there has been no word if the policy will stay the same in 2018. It may not. New chief executive officer Derek Jeter spent his entire playing career with the Yankees, an organization with a longstanding no facial hair policy.

"We had some unwritten rules about beard length," Straily said. "I wasn't able to get too carried away over the summer. I didn't touch it when I got home until the other day. ... It was getting pretty lumberjack-ish."

Straily was the Marlins' most durable starter in 2017, going 10-9 with a 4.26 ERA. His 33 starts and 181 2/3 innings topped the club.

Video: MIA@PHI: Straily K's 10 over six strong innings

Arbitration-eligible for the first time, Straily and Jose Urena are considered frontrunners to start on Opening Day. But Straily also could be dealt at some point during the year; the Orioles are among the clubs that have spoken with Miami about the right-hander.

In a hectic offseason, the Marlins dealt Dee Gordon to the Mariners, Giancarlo Stanton to the Yankees and Marcell Ozuna to the Cardinals in December. Miami also is listening to potential offers for Christian Yelich and J.T. Realmuto.

"We kind of figured it would go one or two ways," Straily said. "[The Marlins] were either going to add a little bit and try one more time at it or start the rebuild process. They obviously made it no secret they are going for the rebuild.

"I really hope that a lot of these guys they were able to pick up in some of these trades, hopefully, they turn out to be great ballplayers. I think that's what they went for and are hoping for as well. But it's prospects. You never know what you're going to get."

If some of the prospects pan out, Straily notes, the franchise could climb back into contention in a shorter period of time.

"I'm really hoping these were all the right moves, and we'll only be in this rebuild mold a very, very short amount of time," the right-hander said.

Video: Frisaro discusses Yelich, Realmuto trade rumors

The Marlins are already around their projected payroll of under $100 million, and they are not mandated to make any further moves. But if something makes sense, they will consider additional moves. In conversations he's had with teammates, Straily noted the players are wondering who will be in camp when Spring Training opens.

"Everyone is kind of getting the same feeling," he said. "At first, it was more of like, 'Hey, who's next?' Then, it was more like, 'This is what we've got.' Then you see the rumblings of Yelich and Realmuto possibilities. … Guys are kind of curious of what our team is going to look like."

Just in case, his name pops up in trade talks, Straily is already making provisions.

"My wife and I are planning people," Straily said. "Little things. When we plan for people to come out to see us or do things, we recommend they do so on Southwest Airlines, because you can change those flights easily."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins, Dan Straily