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Jeter returns to New York for charity events

Former Yankees shortstop and Marlins owner attends Turn 2 luncheon
MLB.com

NEW YORK -- Although a new, high-profile job in Miami takes up most of his time, Derek Jeter has spent a significant chunk of October in New York, the city where he became a star and will always be linked.

The former Yankees shortstop and new Marlins owner still returns to New York once or twice a month, he said. And he tries to make the days count.

NEW YORK -- Although a new, high-profile job in Miami takes up most of his time, Derek Jeter has spent a significant chunk of October in New York, the city where he became a star and will always be linked.

The former Yankees shortstop and new Marlins owner still returns to New York once or twice a month, he said. And he tries to make the days count.

"I schedule a lot of things when I come up," Jeter said. "I'm better at time management now."

Most of those days are spent the way Jeter spent Thursday: in business casual attire, surrounded by immediate family and children he's tended to as such. The agenda for this particular trip: speaking appearances at two events in Upper Manhattan related to his charity work with children.

Jeter spent his late morning at Manhattan's 92nd Street Y, then in the afternoon he was at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital in Washington Heights at a luncheon to celebrate his charity foundation's work with elementary-school students.

For 21 years, Jeter's Turn 2 Foundation has sought to motivate young people to pursue healthy lifestyles, mostly by funding, creating and overseeing programs to work toward that initiative.

Over the past 16 years, one of those programs has been Turn 2 Us, a partnership with NewYork-Presbyterian that's reached more than 10,000 students. Through Turn 2 Us, children are taught techniques to improve their mental health and are encouraged to implement them in their daily lives.

Video: Turn 2 Foundation celebrates 21st year

"For us, as a family, we're extremely proud to see the progress and all the kids that have gone through our program over the years," Jeter said. "It makes us feel pretty good as a family."

Jeter and his father, Sanderson, founded Turn 2 in 1996, after Jeter's rookie season. For the past several years, Derek's sister, Sharlee, has headed it.

"She's the creative one in the family," Derek Jeter said.

But on Thursday, the creative ones at the luncheon were students from local Public School 4, one of the schools Turn 2 helps mentor. Public School 4 is named after late musician Duke Ellington. And in that spirit, students took to the luncheon stage to perform poetry from the Harlem Renaissance. They earned a standing ovation from all in attendance, including the Jeter family.

"That performance was pretty impressive. I was scared to speak in front of 20 people in a classroom at that age," Jeter said. "I grew up here, so to speak. I don't get up here that much anymore. But it always feels good to do something like this."

Joe Trezza is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @joetrezz.