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Thomas still opposed to PED users in Hall

MLB.com @scottmerkin

CHICAGO -- Frank Thomas has witnessed the recent upward Hall of Fame voting movement of players accused of using performance enhancing drugs, or players who actually violated that policy.

The 2014 Hall of Fame inductee continues to object to such an increase in support for those players.

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CHICAGO -- Frank Thomas has witnessed the recent upward Hall of Fame voting movement of players accused of using performance enhancing drugs, or players who actually violated that policy.

The 2014 Hall of Fame inductee continues to object to such an increase in support for those players.

View Full Game Coverage

"They shouldn't creep up. Trust me, that room is not happy with it. Trust me," Thomas said Saturday at Guaranteed Rate Field, where the 1993 American League West champions were being honored. "I talk to a lot of Hall of Famers about it, and they're not happy.

"A lot of these guys [Hall of Famers] didn't make much money, and all they have is their legacy. Trust me, they're not happy about it. We have talked about it. You saw Joe Morgan come out last year."

Thomas, who hit 521 career home runs, always preached about getting to this elite level the right way with no shortcuts. He felt his career was the most hurt, and he was stepped on during this specific era of baseball.

"I had an incredible career, and some of the guys on steroids passed me up in one year," Thomas said. "To dominate for seven straight years like I did and then overnight go back to 15th [all-time] in home runs, it's alarming.

"Back then I was naive. I thought guys were just getting better workout programs, and they were really killing themselves [to get better]. As it panned out, that wasn't the case, as we found out later. That's OK. I got what I deserved.

"Time heals all wounds, and guys go back to saying, 'This guy did this, this guy did that [on the field],'" Thomas said. "I tell people, 'Look at guys' baseball cards. They don't lie.' A guy's got a track record for a reason. If you see big bumps [in stats] and then go down, then another big bump, it is what it is."

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Chicago White Sox