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For Hoffman, HoF induction is a family affair

MLB.com @AJCassavell

NEW YORK -- For the first time he can remember, Glenn Hoffman has the weekend off during the baseball season. He's got a party to attend in Cooperstown, N.Y.

When the Padres depart for San Diego on Thursday, Hoffman -- their third-base coach and the brother of Hall of Fame-bound closer Trevor Hoffman -- will head to upstate New York instead.

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NEW YORK -- For the first time he can remember, Glenn Hoffman has the weekend off during the baseball season. He's got a party to attend in Cooperstown, N.Y.

When the Padres depart for San Diego on Thursday, Hoffman -- their third-base coach and the brother of Hall of Fame-bound closer Trevor Hoffman -- will head to upstate New York instead.

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For Glenn Hoffman, it's the weekend of a lifetime. No, he's not being inducted. But his little brother is, and that might be just as special.

"Being involved in baseball, it's in your life. It's in your blood, and this is the ultimate -- to get into the Hall of Fame," Glenn Hoffman said, as a smile crept onto his face. "He's going in. That's so awesome."

Trevor, meanwhile, is the first to acknowledge that his Hall enshrinement isn't an individual honor.

"It's pretty hard to quantify the impact [Glenn] had on a daily basis, on a career basis," Trevor said. "He's somebody I've always looked up to, admired and idolized. ... It's going to be a crowning moment for the entire family. And to think of all the times where he was teaching without teaching -- that's him by nature."

Video: HOFer Hoffman expresses gratitude towards family

A young Trevor kept a watchful eye as Glenn broke into the big leagues 13 years before him. Since he was 10 years older, Glenn didn't get to watch his younger brother play baseball much. He imparted plenty of wisdom nonetheless.

"I had a front-row seat more than anything, watching his career from high school and obviously into pro ball, through multiple years in the game," Trevor said. "Those lessons really helped."

"He was 10 years younger, but he still had that desire to beat you every time at everything, even though he was smaller than everybody else, and against his older brothers, he had no chance," Glenn said. "When he grew, he still had that competitiveness."

That competitiveness carried Trevor to 601 career saves, a 2.87 career ERA, a 1.05 WHIP and 18 seasons in the Majors. He still serves as a special adviser in the Padres' organization, and he is constantly around the club -- especially during Spring Training, when he works extensively with young pitchers.

Glenn fills a more formal role. He's spent nearly 30 years coaching, including part of the 1998 season as interim manager of the Dodgers, when he got to manage against his little brother. Trevor recorded five saves and didn't allow a run to Glenn's squad.

Video: Trevor's Time: Pranking Glenn

"I'm trying to win a game for us, and I see him coming in," Glenn said. "That's not good for me, when you know that every time he saves the game."

After the 2005 season, Glenn joined the Padres' coaching staff, and his tenure coincided with three of Trevor's seasons, including a National League West title in '06.

"It was just so rewarding after all those years to come over to the Padres and be with him for three years," Glenn said. "I was more nervous then than I've ever been, because I was rooting so hard for him to get it done.

"That was something special, those three years. With the age gap, and me being away playing ball, then him being away playing ball, we got all that time spent together."

Glenn and Trevor have a bit more time to spend together this weekend, when infielders coach Josh Johnson will fill in for Glenn against Arizona.

It took Trevor three years on the ballot before he was elected, and the younger Hoffman was never quite certain until he got the fateful phone call. Glenn, meanwhile, knew it was coming all along.

Video: Hoffman discusses memorable phone call for the Hall

"The day I knew he was going to the Hall of Fame was when they started collecting every ball that he threw and every shoe after every game," Glenn said. "I thought, 'How do you do that? How do you change shoes after every save?'

"Now it's here, and it's going to be fun."

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

San Diego Padres