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Gleyber shows elder Colon no respect with HRs

MLB.com @BryanHoch

ARLINGTON -- There was a point when the Yankees would marvel over the date on Gleyber Torres' birth certificate, but that has ceased, 25 games into what is shaping up to be a memorable rookie campaign. The Yankees infielder has earned his place on the roster and the respect of his teammates.

Torres contributed another night to remember on Monday, becoming the youngest Yankee to enjoy a multihomer game since Mickey Mantle in 1952. Torres crushed a two-run homer in the second inning and a solo blast in the sixth, leading New York to a 10-5 drubbing of the Rangers at Globe Life Park.

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ARLINGTON -- There was a point when the Yankees would marvel over the date on Gleyber Torres' birth certificate, but that has ceased, 25 games into what is shaping up to be a memorable rookie campaign. The Yankees infielder has earned his place on the roster and the respect of his teammates.

Torres contributed another night to remember on Monday, becoming the youngest Yankee to enjoy a multihomer game since Mickey Mantle in 1952. Torres crushed a two-run homer in the second inning and a solo blast in the sixth, leading New York to a 10-5 drubbing of the Rangers at Globe Life Park.

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"I just try to look for my pitch," Torres said. "If the pitcher doesn't throw me my pitch, I try to stay focused, waiting for my pitch."

Ranked as the Yankees' top prospect and the No. 4 prospect in baseball by MLB Pipeline, Torres has homered three times in his last three games and six times in his last 13 contests. Manager Aaron Boone might not have expected so much power so soon, but the poise has not been a surprise.

"Oh, he belongs," Boone said. "When I pencil him in every day, I feel like I'm penciling in a really good player that really knows how to play the game as well. He plays beyond his years from the intangible things that he brings, but obviously he's doing so many things well on both sides of the ball."

Aaron Hicks no longer thinks about the fact that Torres is playing -- and succeeding -- in the big leagues at age 21. Rather, Hicks has taken to appreciating the patience Torres is showing on a nightly basis.

"He has professional at-bats all the time," Hicks said. "You'll see him swing at a bad pitch and then you'll see [the pitcher] throw that pitch again. He'll lay off. He'll get deep into the count, and he's not afraid to shoot the ball the other way. ... His approach is beyond his years. It's amazing that he's so young, being able to have an approach like that. It's pretty impressive."

Both of Torres' homers came off right-hander Bartolo Colon, who was hammered for a season-high six runs, three days shy of his 45th birthday. Torres was three months old when Colon made his Major League debut for the 1997 Indians.

Video: TEX@NYY: How old were Yankees when Colon debuted?

"I feel pretty good," Torres said. "Bartolo is a really good pitcher. He's got a lot of experience. I feel good for that. I focus and try to do my job."

Sandwiched between the homers was a fourth-inning Colon pitch that drilled Torres in the right thigh, but both Torres and Boone do not believe there was any intent.

"No, I didn't," Boone said. "He might have been going in there without regard, like, 'I'm going to make sure that I miss with this pitch in. I'm not going to miss on the plate with it.' But I don't think there's any intent there."

Torres rounded the bases twice at 21 years and 159 days of age. Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he did so on Aug. 11, 1952.

In addition, there was an age gap of 23 years and 203 days between Torres and Colon. According to STATS, that is the third-largest for a home run in Yankees history; the largest was Mantle, who had a gap of 25 years and 105 days when he homered off Satchel Paige on Aug. 29, 1951.

Torres is flattered by the lofty (and continuing) comparisons to the Commerce Comet, but he is no stranger to high expectations. He has spoken several times about wanting to remain humble on this stage, something he tries to do every time he laces his cleats.

"I learn every day," he said. "I try to take more experience every day, enjoy every day. Do my job and try to have fun every time."

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

New York Yankees, Gleyber Torres