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Broxton pulls off great escape on basepaths

Arcia helps engineer scoring play by prolonging rundown
MLB.com @AdamMcCalvy

CINCINNATI -- It wasn't exactly the clean escape choreographed by Lorenzo Cain and Christian Yelich a few weeks earlier against the Cubs, but the result was similar for Orlando Arcia and Keon Broxton in Friday's 8-2 win over the Reds at Great American Ball Park.

The Brewers were happy to take a free run, any way they could get it.

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CINCINNATI -- It wasn't exactly the clean escape choreographed by Lorenzo Cain and Christian Yelich a few weeks earlier against the Cubs, but the result was similar for Orlando Arcia and Keon Broxton in Friday's 8-2 win over the Reds at Great American Ball Park.

The Brewers were happy to take a free run, any way they could get it.

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"When you do something to help the team win, no matter what it is, it makes you happy," said Arcia. "It makes everyone happy."

The Brewers were nursing a 2-1 lead in the eighth inning with Broxton at third base and Arcia at second after the duo pulled off a double steal with one out. On the next pitch, Reds catcher Tucker Barnhart threw down to third and had Broxton picked off, but Broxton and Arcia remained in a rundown long enough to draw a throw to second base.

That gave Broxton a chance to break for home and score for a 3-1 lead.

"That play is on Arcia," said manager Craig Counsell. "Arcia made that play happen, for sure."

Arcia was out on the play, but it was still reminiscent of a bit of baserunning magic by Cain and Yelich back on June 12 against the Cubs, when the duo's escape on a similar play led to two runs in a 4-0 win.

Video: Must C Crafty: Baserunning helps pad Crew's lead

"Keon caused a little traffic jam, but there's no question Arcia's paying attention to the game against the Cubs when Cain does it, and he did the same exact thing," Counsell said. "It turned out a little bit different, but it disrupted their rundown, obviously. At the time it was a huge run to make it 3-1."

Said Arcia: "Right there I was just thinking to be as close to third as I can, just in case Broxton got tagged out, I could make it to third without being tagged out. Then once he made it safe to third, I was just trying to make it safe to second, make something happen."

It worked. When the Reds ran Broxton all the way back to third base, their only play was to try to retire Arcia.

That was the opening Broxton needed to score.

"You know what? That play, I take full responsibility for that play," said Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman. "I'm the manager of the club. When we do not execute a rundown correctly, which has happened to us a couple of times, that's on the manager to make sure it doesn't happen, and it did happen. It's the second or third time it's happened, and we've got to clean that up."

What went wrong?

"I don't want to get into specifics of it," Riggleman said. "What's supposed to happen is I'm supposed to make it more clear to them what they're supposed to do there. We will do that."

The Brewers, meanwhile, will wait for a spot to pull off the play again.

"That was a wild one," said Broxton. "It was high adrenaline, and it was fun. I'm glad it worked out."

Adam McCalvy has covered the Brewers for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @AdamMcCalvy and like him on Facebook.

Milwaukee Brewers, Keon Broxton