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Let's play two: Best multiposition players

Cabrera could join elite list of superstars to play 700 games at two defensive spots
MLB.com

With the Tigers set to play four of their first nine regular-season games in National League ballparks, Miguel Cabrera could find himself spending time at third base during the season's opening two weeks.

Though Cabrera did not appear anywhere other than first base last season, the 10-time All-Star is certainly no stranger to the hot corner. In fact, if Cabrera indeed logs time at third base in each of those four Interleague games, it will give him 700 career appearances there.

With the Tigers set to play four of their first nine regular-season games in National League ballparks, Miguel Cabrera could find himself spending time at third base during the season's opening two weeks.

Though Cabrera did not appear anywhere other than first base last season, the 10-time All-Star is certainly no stranger to the hot corner. In fact, if Cabrera indeed logs time at third base in each of those four Interleague games, it will give him 700 career appearances there.

Ausmus: Cabrera may open season at 3B

That would put him in some elite company, as he would become only the 40th player with at least 700 appearances at multiple defensive positions. He's already exceeded that mark at first base, where he's appeared 831 times.

Video: Top 10 First Basemen Right Now: Nos. 10-3

While the number of multiposition players is limited, there is certainly no shortage of star power on the list. The following is a closer look at where Cabrera would rank among players who have appeared in 700-plus games at multiple infield positions, based on WAR (courtesy of Baseball-Reference).

Though this piece features only infielders, there is also a list below of the top five players who appeared in at least 700 games at any two positions, outfield included.

5. Harmon Killebrew
Positions: 1B/3B
Career WAR: 60.3

Before going on to hit 573 homers in his Hall of Fame career, Killebrew made only three homerless starts during his first go-around in the Majors in 1954 -- all at second base. He continued to play there in a limited role for the Washington Senators over the next four years, though he transitioned to third base for 50 of his 52 starts from 1955-58. Killebrew finally burst onto the scene in '59, crushing an American League-best 42 home runs, all while making 149 of his 153 starts at third base.

He wouldn't get too comfortable, however, as he spent the following season splitting time between first and third base. He then played primarily first base in 1961 before moving out of the infield entirely the following year. The slugger spent the vast majority of his time from 1962-64 patrolling left field, before right knee surgery forced him back to the infield for the '65 season. Killebrew returned to mostly alternating between first and third for the remainder of his 22-year career, ultimately finishing with 930 starts at first base, 718 at third base and 468 in left field. He earned the '69 AL Most Valuable Player Award while appearing 105 times at third base and 80 at first base.

Video: 1965 ASG: Killebrew's two-run homer ties the game

4. Cabrera
Positions: 1B/3B
Career WAR: 64.7

Originally signed as a shortstop at the age of 16, Cabrera instead spent his first three big league seasons primarily in the Marlins' outfield due to surrounding circumstances. With the 2003 Marlins getting little to no offensive production in left field -- and Mike Lowell in the midst of his second straight All-Star campaign at third base -- the club elected to promote Cabrera and his highly touted bat directly from Double-A Carolina in an attempt to fill the void. He made his Major League debut in left field on June 20, 2003, after making only three outfield appearances in the Minors.

Though his defense was understandably less than ideal, Cabrera notched 12 homers and 62 RBIs in just 87 games en route to helping the Marlins win the World Series. He switched back to third base for the 2006-07 seasons, but he lasted only 14 games at the hot corner after being traded to Detroit before the '08 campaign. After making five errors in only 50 total chances, the Tigers moved Cabrera to first base, where he would remain until the arrival of Prince Fielder in '12. Cabrera spent two seasons at third -- and won back-to-back AL MVP Awards in the process -- before moving back to first when Detroit traded Fielder to Texas following the '13 season.

Video: CLE@DET: Statcast™ tracks Miggy's homer into well

3. Ernie Banks
Positions: 1B/SS
Career WAR: 67.4

Affectionately known as Mr. Cub, Banks is widely remembered as a shortstop despite the fact that he actually logged more time at first base. The 11-time All-Star and two-time NL MVP spent his first nine seasons almost exclusively at shortstop before a knee injury forced him to switch positions in 1961. He originally moved to left field, then shifted to first base for seven games, then went back to shortstop for his final 74 games. Banks' knee problems, however, forced him to begin the following season at first base and he never again appeared at shortstop.

Banks finished his 19-year career with 1,259 games played at first base and 1,125 games at shortstop. The Hall of Famer slugged 512 homers and drove in 1,636 runs while spending his entire career with the Cubs.

Video: Hall of Fame Bio: Ernie Banks

2. Rod Carew
Positions: 1B/2B
Career WAR: 81.1

Carew burst onto the scene as an elite second baseman in 1967, cruising his way to the AL Rookie of the Year Award and earning the first of 18 consecutive All-Star selections. He remained a consistent offensive force at the keystone until late in the 1975 season, when Twins manager Frank Quilici used him at first base for the club's final 15 games. Gene Mauch took over as Minnesota's skipper the following season and elected to keep Carew at first base permanently, with the intention of extending his career.

Though Carew later left Minnesota as a free agent to sign with the Angels following the 1983 season, he remained almost exclusively at first base. He appeared at second base only 17 times following the initial switch -- and never again as a starter. Carew finished his 19-year career with 1,184 appearances at first and 1,130 at second.

Video: MIN@LAA: Carew collects his 3,000th career hit

1. Alex Rodriguez
Positions: SS/3B
Career WAR: 118.9

Aside from a few appearances as a designated hitter, Rodriguez never appeared anywhere other than at shortstop over his first 10 big league seasons with the Mariners and Rangers. That all changed in 2004, when he agreed to waive his no-trade clause for a deal that sent him to the Yankees -- a team that had Derek Jeter at shortstop. A-Rod agreed to move to third base, despite the fact that he had won back-to-back Gold Glove Awards at shortstop and was the reigning AL MVP Award winner at the time of the trade.

Though he's made a few appearances at shortstop in a Yankees uniform, Rodriguez has not started a single game at shortstop since the trade. He spent the majority of his first 10 seasons in the Bronx at third base before missing the entire 2014 campaign due to suspension. Following his return, A-Rod was used almost exclusively as a DH, making only six appearances in the field -- four at third base and two at first base -- last year.

Video: TOR@NYY: A-Rod launches two-run blast off Estrada

Top 5 overall, including outfielders

1. Babe Ruth (LF/RF): 163.1 WAR
2. Ty Cobb (CF/RF): 151
3. Stan Musial (1B/LF/RF): 128.1
4. Rodriguez (3B/SS): 118.9
5. Frank Robinson (LF/RF): 107.1

Paul Casella is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @paul_casella.

Miguel Cabrera, Alex Rodriguez