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Coaching carousel just part of today's game

Six clubs making change at manager, 12 at pitching coach
MLB.com @TracyRingolsby

In the aftermath of the 2017 season, six clubs made managerial changes, including a record three teams that had advanced to the postseason.

Surprised? Don't be.

In the aftermath of the 2017 season, six clubs made managerial changes, including a record three teams that had advanced to the postseason.

Surprised? Don't be.

It's a part of the ever-evolving game.

Yes, Dusty Baker (who won back-to-back division titles in two years with the Nationals), Joe Girardi (who is coming off taking the Yankees to the postseason for the sixth time in the past nine years) and John Farrell (who took the Red Sox to a World Series championship in 2013 and division titles the past two seasons) are out of work.

That, however, isn't the most unique part of this offseason.

How about the fact that 12 teams have changed pitching coaches? Now, that includes the Indians, who saw Mickey Callaway resign after five years to become the manager of the Mets.

Six of the other 11 already have found big league jobs, including Carl Willis, who was let go after three years with the Red Sox and replaced Callaway on the Indians' staff.

Video: Bastian on Indians rehiring Willis as pitching coach

That's the same Carl Willis who became a pitching coach for the first time in Cleveland, where he served from 2003-09, and his pupils included Cy Young Award winners Cliff Lee (2008) and CC Sabathia (2007). Willis also was a pitching coach with the Mariners from 2010-13, with Felix Hernandez winning a Cy Young in '10. Willis then joined the Red Sox for three seasons in 2015, guiding Rick Porcello to a Cy Young in '16.

Dana LeVangie -- a Whitman, Mass., native -- who has spent 27 years in the Red Sox organization as a player, advance scout and big league bullpen coach, takes over for Willis in Boston.

Video: LeVangie, Cora on promotion to Sox's pitching coach

Derek Lilliquist and Mike Maddux ostensibly swapped jobs. Lilliquist, let go after 16 years as a coach in the Cardinals' system, including the past seven as the big league pitching coach, is now in the same role for the Nationals. He replaced Maddux, who was let go with Baker and is now St. Louis' pitching coach.

Dave Eiland, who had been the Yankees' pitching coach from 2008-10 and joined the Royals in 2011, was let go after the season. He now finds himself back in New York, only this time as the pitching coach for the Mets, replacing Dan Warthen, who spent the past 10 seasons tutoring the Mets' pitching staff. He came to the Mets after serving in a similar role with the Dodgers (2006-07), Tigers (1999-2002), Padres (1996-97), Mariners (1991-92) and Pirates (1981).

Video: Maddux excited to join historic Cardinals franchise

Cal Eldred, who most recently was a special assistant to Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak, replaced Eiland in Kansas City. It will be his coaching debut.

Jim Hickey, after 11 years with the Rays, opted to rejoin former Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon with the Cubs. Hickey replaces Chris Bosio, who after six years in Chicago now finds himself as the pitching coach with the Tigers, who let Rich Dubee go after two years on the job. Kyle Snyder, a pitching coach in the Rays' system the past six seasons, was promoted to replace Hickey.

Video: Bosio on being named pitching coach of the Tigers

After 17 years as the Giants' pitching coach, Dave Righetti was moved into the role of a special adviser for the final year of his contract. He was replaced by Curt Young, a veteran pitching coach who was let go by the A's on June 15. Young began his coaching career with Oakland (2004-10) before spending 2011 in Boston and returning to the A's at the start of the 2012 season.

The Twins did give manager Paul Molitor a three-year extension at season's end, but Neil Allen -- their pitching coach the past four seasons -- was replaced by Garvin Alston, who will be making his debut as a big league coach. Alston spent 11 years coaching in Oakland's Minor League system before joining the D-backs as a bullpen coach in 2016 and spending '17 as the Padres coordinator of Minor League pitching rehab.

Video: Bollinger on Twins naming Alston pitching coach

And then there is Philadelphia. Longtime pitching coach Bob McClure, who has spent time with the Marlins (1994), Royals (2006-11), Red Sox (2012) and the past four seasons with the Phillies, won't be back, but his replacement hasn't been announced.

There are plenty of experienced candidates who are available if the Phillies are interested.

It's a part of the ever-changing face of the game.

Tracy Ringolsby is a columnist for MLB.com.