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MVP - Must Visit the Postseason

He is the league's best and most consistent performer. His stats are head and shoulders above the rest. Without him, his team wouldn't be anywhere near as good. He is the Most Valuable Player…but what if he doesn't get his team to the Postseason? Is he really an MVP?

It's been debated and debated again. Can someone truly be the MVP of the league if the club he plays for spends the early part of October cleaning out their lockers and making vacation plans? I mean sure, the guy killed the ball all season and if he is available, every team in the Bigs will be lighting up some agent's iPhone like the 4th of July trying to retain the services of said player…but shouldn't an MVP be in the playoffs?

I'm saying no. The truth of the matter is the best player in the game doesn't always play for a contender. Yes, it does and has happened, but not always. An outstanding talent emerges on a team going nowhere fast. He might be a vacuum at shortstop, rake with runners in scoring position, possess speed and have a staggering natural knack for the game of baseball…but if his starting staff gives up six runs a game on average, if his bullpen can only shutdown on themselves, and if the rest of the lineup plays like Timmy Lupus and Rudy Stein…well, how much can one man do by himself? Does the play of his club lessen his own?

Baseball is the epitome of a team sport. Playoff and championship teams have to fire on all cylinders to get it done. As great as one player is, one player can't do it alone. Even the Babe had help.

I think the MVP should be measured on how much he does to help his club—October-bound or not. A poor-playing, cellar dweller can hover around the .500 mark because one player is performing on another planet. He also makes his teammates push themselves to be better. He is the "most valuable" asset the club has, a guy who brings his "A game" every day, but also helps his teammates find theirs…even if that only gets them to 3rd place in the division.

The great thing about having an MVP on your team is that you can and should build around them or through them. If you have the MVP and still need so much more, a good GM will work a deal to move his top gun for a host of young, up and comers who can get a franchise turned around. On the other hand, top free agents will be more apt to want to join a club that has the game's best player. That's what an MVP does.

Former Major League manager Bobby Valentine was here at the MLB Fan Cave for a visit on Friday night. He stressed that in this game the best player doesn't always play on the best team, but the team playing the best at the right time will always win. You can be the best in the game and not play in the Postseason, but I think every man that ever earned the MVP would gladly trade it to be a part of a World Series Championship team.

What do you think? Tweet me @mikeyoh21.

He is the league's best and most consistent performer. His stats are head and shoulders above the rest. Without him, his team wouldn't be anywhere near as good. He is the Most Valuable Player…but what if he doesn't get his team to the Postseason? Is he really an MVP?

It's been debated and debated again. Can someone truly be the MVP of the league if the club he plays for spends the early part of October cleaning out their lockers and making vacation plans? I mean sure, the guy killed the ball all season and if he is available, every team in the Bigs will be lighting up some agent's iPhone like the 4th of July trying to retain the services of said player…but shouldn't an MVP be in the playoffs?

I'm saying no. The truth of the matter is the best player in the game doesn't always play for a contender. Yes, it does and has happened, but not always. An outstanding talent emerges on a team going nowhere fast. He might be a vacuum at shortstop, rake with runners in scoring position, possess speed and have a staggering natural knack for the game of baseball…but if his starting staff gives up six runs a game on average, if his bullpen can only shutdown on themselves, and if the rest of the lineup plays like Timmy Lupus and Rudy Stein…well, how much can one man do by himself? Does the play of his club lessen his own?

Baseball is the epitome of a team sport. Playoff and championship teams have to fire on all cylinders to get it done. As great as one player is, one player can't do it alone. Even the Babe had help.

I think the MVP should be measured on how much he does to help his club—October-bound or not. A poor-playing, cellar dweller can hover around the .500 mark because one player is performing on another planet. He also makes his teammates push themselves to be better. He is the "most valuable" asset the club has, a guy who brings his "A game" every day, but also helps his teammates find theirs…even if that only gets them to 3rd place in the division.

The great thing about having an MVP on your team is that you can and should build around them or through them. If you have the MVP and still need so much more, a good GM will work a deal to move his top gun for a host of young, up and comers who can get a franchise turned around. On the other hand, top free agents will be more apt to want to join a club that has the game's best player. That's what an MVP does.

Former Major League manager Bobby Valentine was here at the MLB Fan Cave for a visit on Friday night. He stressed that in this game the best player doesn't always play on the best team, but the team playing the best at the right time will always win. You can be the best in the game and not play in the Postseason, but I think every man that ever earned the MVP would gladly trade it to be a part of a World Series Championship team.

What do you think? Tweet me @mikeyoh21.