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Sandoval walks all the way to first ... on ball 3

MLB.com @JoeTrezz

SAN FRANCISCO -- Over the course of the five perfect innings that began Luke Weaver's night in Thursday's 11-2 Cardinals win at AT&T Park, no hitter put up more of a fight than Pablo Sandoval. The Giants' third baseman fouled off six consecutive pitches before seemingly working a walk, accounting for Weaver's first baserunner of the evening with two outs in the fifth.

But shortly after Sandoval reached first, he was called back.

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SAN FRANCISCO -- Over the course of the five perfect innings that began Luke Weaver's night in Thursday's 11-2 Cardinals win at AT&T Park, no hitter put up more of a fight than Pablo Sandoval. The Giants' third baseman fouled off six consecutive pitches before seemingly working a walk, accounting for Weaver's first baserunner of the evening with two outs in the fifth.

But shortly after Sandoval reached first, he was called back.

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Sandoval had already removed his protective elbow and shin gear and jogged entirely down the baseline before the Cardinals' dugout noticed a vital detail. The 10th pitch of the at-bat -- a curveball from Weaver that hung up and away -- was only the third ball of the sequence, not the fourth.

"I asked the bench," Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said. "I whistled and had the umpire stop for a second. The replay phone rang and by that point, they figured it out on the field."

Given another chance to retire Sandoval, Weaver struck him out on another curve -- the 12th pitch of the at-bat -- to remain flawless through five.

But it did not come without delay. Sandoval took considerable time returning to the plate, so much so that home-plate umpire Fieldin Culbreth allotted Weaver a warmup pitch. Weaver followed that with a 94.2 mph four-seam fastball that Sandoval spoiled, before getting him on a curve below the zone.

"He wears a lot of gear," Weaver said. "It left me in a weird state of mind there … it became about trying to lock back in and make a big pitch. I was pretty emotional afterwards because it was a pretty big pitch. I tried not to worry about what was going on with the [perfect game]. I was focusing on executing a pitch that I had just walked him on, so to speak."

Joe Trezza is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @joetrezz.

San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, Pablo Sandoval, Luke Weaver