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Which Deadline deals have been most successful?

Former GM Jim Duquette names best 2018 Trade Deadline acquisitions
MLB.com

While less than two weeks have passed since the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline, it's not too early to evaluate some of the deals that went down last month.

After all, some of the players who were moved have already made a notable impact for their new teams. Here are the most successful Deadline acquisitions to this point.

While less than two weeks have passed since the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline, it's not too early to evaluate some of the deals that went down last month.

After all, some of the players who were moved have already made a notable impact for their new teams. Here are the most successful Deadline acquisitions to this point.

Position players

1. Steve Pearce, 1B/OF, Red Sox
In terms of the production received and the amount given up, the Pearce trade has to be considered the best of this year's Deadline so far. The journeyman slugger almost singlehandedly crushed the Yankees' hopes of winning the American League East with his home run barrage in last weekend's four-game series, belting three home runs in Boston's 15-7 win in Game 1 and following that up with another round-tripper in the club's 4-1 victory in Game 2. In 22 games with the Red Sox, Pearce has slashed .313/.423/.625 with five homers and 14 RBIs. His 1.048 OPS in that span is more than 200 points higher than the mark he posted (.868) with the Blue Jays this season and nearly 300 points greater than his lifetime number (.784).

Video: Must C Classic: Pearce belts three homers vs. Yankees

2. Brian Dozier, 2B, Dodgers
After nearly acquiring Dozier in the 2016-17 offseason, only to move on to a lower-cost alternative (Logan Forsythe), the Dodgers finally brought Dozier aboard from the Twins shortly before 4 p.m. ET on July 31. The early returns have been impressive, with Dozier recording a .276/.417/.690 slash line, three homers and nine RBIs in nine games with Los Angeles. In fact, Dozier already has more homers and RBIs than Manny Machado has tallied in 21 games with the Dodgers (two homers, five RBIs).

Honorable mention: Asdrubal Cabrera, 2B/SS/3B, Phillies
After going hitless in his first two games with the Phillies, Cabrera has been an offensive force for the club in his past nine contests (.833 OPS). The 32-year-old has primarily manned shortstop with his new team despite not appearing there since 2016 with the Mets, shoring up what was arguably Philadelphia's biggest weak spot. And though J.P. Crawford is nearing a return from the disabled list, Cabrera's versatility will allow the Phils to keep the veteran's bat in the lineup on a regular basis.

Starting pitchers

1. Cole Hamels, LHP, Cubs
Whether it's due to a change of scenery, a return to the friendlier confines of the National League, or a little of both, Hamels has been fantastic in his two starts with the Cubs. Most importantly, the left-hander hasn't allowed a homer yet after yielding 23 in 114 1/3 innings (1.8 HR/9) with the Rangers. In fact, all 10 of the hits he has surrendered with the Cubs have been singles. Hitters had a .709 slugging percentage against Hamels' four-seam fastball and a .490 mark vs. his changeup during the southpaw's time with the Rangers this year. With the Cubs, those numbers are .364 and .154, respectively. With Yu Darvish expected to be sidelined until September and Jose Quintana still providing inconsistent results, the addition of Hamels could prove to be the move that helps the Cubs win the NL Central.

Video: CHC@KC: Hamels K's 2 over 6 innings of 1-run ball

2. Nathan Eovaldi, RHP, Red Sox
The Red Sox acquired Eovaldi to reinforce the back end of their rotation, which has been shaky this season mainly due to injuries. But though he had a rough time on Friday night against the Orioles, the right-hander pitched like a top-of-the-rotation stud in his first two starts with Boston, tossing 15 shutout innings -- including eight vs. the Yankees on Aug. 4. 

Honorable mention: Lance Lynn, RHP, Yankees
Lynn was an afterthought among New York's Trade Deadline acquisitions, but he has outshined most of the pitchers who were dealt in July and allayed some of the Yankees' concerns about the back of their rotation. After tossing 4 1/3 scoreless inning in relief of Sonny Gray on Aug. 1 vs. the Orioles, Lynn replaced Gray in the rotation and threw 7 1/3 shutout frames with only two hits allowed against the White Sox on Aug. 6. Lynn still has a 4.58 ERA on the year, but he has recorded a 3.17 mark in his past 14 games (13 starts).

Relief pitchers

1. Jeurys Familia, RHP, A's
Arguably no team has benefited more from a bullpen acquisition than the A's with Familia. The former Mets closer was used for multiple innings in each of his first two Oakland appearances and hasn't allowed a run in 10 total frames with the club. The A's rotation has been decimated by injuries this season, but the addition of Familia has allowed manager Bob Melvin to effectively shorten the game by using Lou Trivino in the seventh inning and multi-inning weapon Yusmeiro Petit even earlier than that. Familia is also a tremendous insurance policy for closer Blake Treinen.

Video: OAK@TEX: Familia fans Gallo to send game into 10th

2. Brad Hand, LHP, Indians
While the Indians paid a heavy price to acquire Hand and Adam Cimber from the Padres, sending top prospect Francisco Mejia to San Diego, the left-hander's performance has made that easier for Cleveland to swallow. Hand has thrived in multiple relief roles for the club, posting a 1.80 ERA with a 12-to-1 K/BB ratio, three saves and three holds in 10 innings. His presence has taken some of the pressure off primary closer Cody Allen and will allow manager Terry Francona to ease Andrew Miller back into the mix after the lefty missed more than two months with a right knee injury.

Honorable mention: Tyler Glasnow, RHP, TB
Formerly a top prospect, Glasnow struggled mightily with his control over the past three years with the Pirates (5.8 BB/9 rate) and was working in middle relief before he was traded as part of the package for Chris Archer. While it's unclear what his long-term role will be with the innovative Rays, Glasnow has looked like a different pitcher as the "opener" in two games for Tampa Bay. Not only has the hard-throwing youngster racked up 14 strikeouts in seven innings with his new team, but he has also walked just two batters.

Jim Duquette, who was the Mets' GM in 2004, offers his opinions as a studio analyst and columnist for MLB.com.