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Rollins Attempts To Break Guinness World Record

I read a very neat story out of Philadelphia the other day. For a Red Bull promotion, Jimmy Rollins attempted to break the Guinness World Record for the longest home run ever hit, which is currently held by none other than Babe Ruth. The Bambino hit a ball 575 feet back in 1921, and Rollins was attempting to pass that mark on a street in downtown Philadelphia. J-Roll did give himself a bit of an advantage, however, as he decided to attempt the feat using an aluminum bat.

His try came up short. Well short, actually, as the longest ball Rollins could muster was 463 feet. A valiant effort, but it takes a herculean swing to pass the Babe. It did get me thinking though. Who would have the best chance of hitting a ball 577 feet, if aluminum bats are fair play?

Here is my list of the top-5 current players who might have a shot at it.

5. Mark Reynolds, Baltimore Orioles

This is assuming that the guy throwing the pitch doesn't aim for the gargantuan hole in Mr. Reynolds' swing. When the big third baseman does connect, the ball goes a long way. He hit one about 440 the other day, so you know he's got the pop to do it, especially with aluminum.

4. Nelson Cruz, Texas Rangers

No brainer here, as Nelly is one of the very best in the business at hitting the ball a long, long way. His shot in Texas a few weeks ago still has people talking.

3. Carlos Pena, Chicago Cubs

He's finally starting to come around for the Cubbies, so now might be the best opportunity to get him to try this. He has the perfect swing for a left-handed power hitter, though his tendency to pull the ball might make it dangerous to try it on a street, J-Roll style.

2. Adam Dunn, Chicago White Sox

He also suffers from Mark Reynolds' disease, but if the batting practice pitcher can throw it to the sweet spot, I'm not sure there is another guy who can hit the ball farther. Dunn has been responsible for some of the most prodigious moonshots in recent memory.

1. Mike Stanton, Florida Marlins

My favorite in this competition. Stanton has ridiculous power, incredible strength, and fantastic bat speed. Plus, his tendency to hit line drive home runs rather than high, arching blasts may help him here. I'd love to see Big Mike with an aluminum bat in his hands, but I'd prefer to see it from behind. I certainly don't want to be in front of him when he starts lining frozen ropes off the metal.

Which player do you think would be most likely to break the record? Tweet me at @rwags614.

I read a very neat story out of Philadelphia the other day. For a Red Bull promotion, Jimmy Rollins attempted to break the Guinness World Record for the longest home run ever hit, which is currently held by none other than Babe Ruth. The Bambino hit a ball 575 feet back in 1921, and Rollins was attempting to pass that mark on a street in downtown Philadelphia. J-Roll did give himself a bit of an advantage, however, as he decided to attempt the feat using an aluminum bat.

His try came up short. Well short, actually, as the longest ball Rollins could muster was 463 feet. A valiant effort, but it takes a herculean swing to pass the Babe. It did get me thinking though. Who would have the best chance of hitting a ball 577 feet, if aluminum bats are fair play?

Here is my list of the top-5 current players who might have a shot at it.

5. Mark Reynolds, Baltimore Orioles

This is assuming that the guy throwing the pitch doesn't aim for the gargantuan hole in Mr. Reynolds' swing. When the big third baseman does connect, the ball goes a long way. He hit one about 440 the other day, so you know he's got the pop to do it, especially with aluminum.

4. Nelson Cruz, Texas Rangers

No brainer here, as Nelly is one of the very best in the business at hitting the ball a long, long way. His shot in Texas a few weeks ago still has people talking.

3. Carlos Pena, Chicago Cubs

He's finally starting to come around for the Cubbies, so now might be the best opportunity to get him to try this. He has the perfect swing for a left-handed power hitter, though his tendency to pull the ball might make it dangerous to try it on a street, J-Roll style.

2. Adam Dunn, Chicago White Sox

He also suffers from Mark Reynolds' disease, but if the batting practice pitcher can throw it to the sweet spot, I'm not sure there is another guy who can hit the ball farther. Dunn has been responsible for some of the most prodigious moonshots in recent memory.

1. Mike Stanton, Florida Marlins

My favorite in this competition. Stanton has ridiculous power, incredible strength, and fantastic bat speed. Plus, his tendency to hit line drive home runs rather than high, arching blasts may help him here. I'd love to see Big Mike with an aluminum bat in his hands, but I'd prefer to see it from behind. I certainly don't want to be in front of him when he starts lining frozen ropes off the metal.

Which player do you think would be most likely to break the record? Tweet me at @rwags614.