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Schebler's slam leads to win over Mets

MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Joey Votto's patience and Scott Schebler's power remained a lethal combination for the Reds, who leaned on three walks from the former and a grand slam from the latter Tuesday in a 14-4 win over the Mets at Great American Ball Park.

Schebler also walked, scored twice and singled home a run, matching his career high with five RBIs. Each of those came against Mets rookie Chris Flexen, who allowed seven runs in 4 2/3 innings to bloat his ERA to 6.89. For that, Flexen could mostly thank Schebler, whose first-inning slam made him the third Reds player to reach 27 homers.

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CINCINNATI -- Joey Votto's patience and Scott Schebler's power remained a lethal combination for the Reds, who leaned on three walks from the former and a grand slam from the latter Tuesday in a 14-4 win over the Mets at Great American Ball Park.

Schebler also walked, scored twice and singled home a run, matching his career high with five RBIs. Each of those came against Mets rookie Chris Flexen, who allowed seven runs in 4 2/3 innings to bloat his ERA to 6.89. For that, Flexen could mostly thank Schebler, whose first-inning slam made him the third Reds player to reach 27 homers.

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Grand slams mean 40% off pizza

"This kid has the opportunity to be a real beast," Reds manager Bryan Price said of Schebler. "The power is phenomenal."

Video: NYM@CIN: Reds plate seven runs in the 8th inning

Votto's three walks gave him eight in his last two games and 112 on the season -- 16 more than anyone else in baseball and 26 more than St. Louis' Matt Carpenter, his closest National League rival. Votto also singled home a run and Adam Duvall hit a three-run homer during a seven-run, eighth-inning rally, which prompted the Mets to use backup catcher Kevin Plawecki on the mound for the second time this season.

Video: NYM@CIN: Duvall cranks a three-run jack to left

All the offense made life easy for Reds starter Sal Romano, who held the Mets to three runs in six innings. Retiring 10 straight Mets during one stretch, Romano improved to 2-0 with a 2.70 ERA in his last three starts.

Video: NYM@CIN: Romano strikes out five across six innings

The win snapped Cincinnati's 14-game losing streak to the Mets, which dated back to 2014. It was one shy of New York's franchise-best streak against any opponent.

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Five-run first: Schebler's slam capped an opening inning that saw the Reds send eight men to the plate against Flexen, taking advantage of the rookie's suspect control. With two men on base, two outs and no runs in, Flexen issued his second walk of the inning to load the bases. That brought up Eugenio Suarez, who singled home the Reds' first run, before Schebler cleared the bases to give the Reds all the offense they would need.

Fighting back: Mets first baseman Dominic Smith snapped an 0-for-11 funk when he singled home two runs against Romano in the sixth. The Mets' seven-batter rally that inning nearly pushed Romano to an early exit.

Video: NYM@CIN: Smith pulls a two-run single to right field

But the rookie struck out Juan Lagares with two men on base to end the threat, completing six innings to record his third consecutive quality start.

"He did what he does best," Mets manager Terry Collins said of Smith. "That's hit the ball the other way."

OLD DOG, NEW TRICKS
In need of outfield help with Yoenis Cespedes and Michael Conforto done for the year, and Curtis Granderson and Jay Bruce traded to contenders, the Mets started Jose Reyes in left for the first time in his 15-year career. Reyes had only one chance at a putout, when Billy Hamilton hit a relatively routine fly ball that soared over his head for a second-inning double.

Video: NYM@CIN: Collins on Reyes' first start in left field

QUOTABLE
"In the moment, I was frustrated. But as soon as the game was over, I went over and addressed it and apologized for that. … Regardless of the frustration or whatever, that can't happen." -- Flexen, who threw his hands in the air in exasperation when Reyes misplayed Hamilton's double

SOUND SMART WITH YOUR FRIENDS
Votto, who walked in five consecutive plate appearances Sunday, made it a team-record six in a row during the first inning before grounding out to end the second. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, only five big leaguers have walked seven straight times in a season: Billy Rogell (1938 Tigers), Mel Ott (1943 Giants), Eddie Stanky (1950 Giants), Jose Canseco (1992 A's) and Barry Bonds (2004 Giants). Votto's streak of six in a row was MLB's longest since Colorado's Brad Hawpe did it in 2008. Votto was playing in his 1,400th career game for Cincinnati, which pushed him past Edd Roush into sole possession of 20th place on the club's all-time list. Dan Driessen (1,480) is ninth.

Video: NYM@CIN: Votto works his sixth consecutive walk

UPON FURTHER REVIEW
Collins asked for a replay review when umpires called Reyes out attempting to steal second base in the seventh inning. But the crew confirmed the ruling via a 62-second review.

Video: NYM@CIN: Reyes out stealing after call confirmed

WHAT'S NEXT
Mets: Seeking to retain his rotation spot as Matt Harvey and Noah Syndergaard edge toward returns from injury, right-hander Rafael Montero (2-9, 5.64 ERA) will start against the Reds at 7:10 p.m. ET Wednesday at Great American Ball Park. Montero last pitched in relief on Sunday, allowing two runs and recording just one out against the Nationals.

Reds: The series continues Wednesday as Homer Bailey (4-6, 7.99 ERA) will start for the Reds. Bailey came out of his most recent start, Aug. 22 vs. the Cubs, after three innings due to irritation on the back of his right shoulder. He has thrown two bullpen sessions since then. He is 1-2, with a 7.15 ERA in four career starts against the Mets.

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Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2008. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.

Andy Call is a contributor to MLB.com based in Cincinnati.