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Trade Talk: Harper, Phillies, Murphy, Yanks

MLB.com

The July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline has come and gone, but the transaction wire could stay hot ahead of Aug. 31. That date is important because clubs acquiring new players via trade must have those players on their 40-man roster by then in order for that player (or players) to be eligible for its postseason roster. Teams can acquire players after Sept. 1, but those players would not be eligible to play with that team in the playoffs. 

Throughout August, it's not uncommon for high-profile players to be placed on waivers. In fact, most clubs will place a sizable portion of their Major League roster on waivers to gauge interest for their talent ahead of the offseason. 

The July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline has come and gone, but the transaction wire could stay hot ahead of Aug. 31. That date is important because clubs acquiring new players via trade must have those players on their 40-man roster by then in order for that player (or players) to be eligible for its postseason roster. Teams can acquire players after Sept. 1, but those players would not be eligible to play with that team in the playoffs. 

Throughout August, it's not uncommon for high-profile players to be placed on waivers. In fact, most clubs will place a sizable portion of their Major League roster on waivers to gauge interest for their talent ahead of the offseason. 

When a waiver claim is placed, the player's original club has three options:
• Work out a standard trade with the claiming club within 48 hours
• Allow the player -- and all money remaining on his contract -- to go to the claiming club with no return
• Pull the player back off waivers

A player who is pulled back off waivers can be placed on trade waivers a second time, but at that point the waiver request becomes irrevocable. If a player passes through waivers unclaimed, he can then be traded to any club, free of restriction (though all 40-man-roster players in the trade must clear waivers before being dealt).

Glossary: Trade Waivers & Aug. 31 'Deadline'

With that in mind, here is the latest trade buzz: 

Harper to Phillies? One rival GM thinks it will happen
Aug. 17: Are the Phillies preparing to make a run at Bryce Harper? According to MLB Network insider Jon Heyman in an article for Fancred Sports, at least one rival general manager thinks the superstar outfielder will end up in Philadelphia.

Of course, that will probably need to wait until the offseason, when Harper is set to become a free agent.

While a Harper trade remains a possibility this month with the Nationals falling further and further behind in the postseason race, the Phils are unlikely to have a chance to deal for the 25-year-old, given their waiver priority. Philadelphia entered Friday with the third-highest winning percentage (.554) in the National League.

And even if the Phillies did put in a successful claim, it's questionable that the Nats would trade Harper to Philadelphia and potentially increase the chances of the slugger signing a long-term deal with one of Washington's division rivals.

The Nationals might be swayed if they received an attractive offer, but the Phils are unlikely to make their top prospects available with Harper just months away from hitting the open market.

Will Yankees chase bat on trade market?
Aug. 17: MLB Network insider Jon Heyman noted Thursday in an article for Fancred Sports that the Yankees sit just a few million dollars below the luxury-tax threshold and are reserving that money "in case there are any more rotation solutions that crop up."

However, the Yankees' offense might be a more pressing issue, even with ace right-hander Luis Severino struggling and lefty CC Sabathia going on the disabled list with a right knee injury earlier this week.

The Yankees scored just two runs while losing their past two games to the Rays, who used four pitchers Wednesday and six Thursday. Since Aaron Judge was placed on the DL with a fractured right wrist on July 27, New York has a .736 OPS, which ranks 14th in the Majors during that time.

Judge said he is feeling better since he had a cortisone shot in his wrist earlier this week, but there's a chance he won't be back until September. And while Gary Sanchez (right groin strain) is closer to a return, he is hitting just .188/.283/.416 this season.

The Orioles' Adam Jones and the Blue Jays' Curtis Granderson, who have both cleared waivers, have been mentioned as potential trade targets for the Yankees, but Jones has the power to veto any deal due to his 10-and-5 rights, and Granderson might not be a significant upgrade.

Another name the Yanks could consider? Impending free agent Daniel Murphy, should the Nats decide to sell. As ESPN's Buster Olney tweeted Thursday, Murphy would be a great fit for an American League club, as he could be used at the designated-hitter spot. New York could also play him at first base in place of Greg Bird, who is carrying a .698 OPS this season.

Tweet from @Buster_ESPN: WAS now 9 games out of 1st in NL East, 7 games out in WC. If the Nats start selling off pieces, you'd have to believe there could be real interest in Daniel Murphy, who is blistering hot -- hitting .392 in his last 30 games, with a .578 SLG. Great fit for AL teams w/DH; NYY/1B.

After missing all of April and May while recovering from right knee surgery and posting a .491 OPS with one homer in his first 21 games, Murphy has produced a 1.007 OPS with five home runs in his past 32 contests.

Donaldson getting closer to return?
Aug. 16: With just over two weeks to go before the end of August, Josh Donaldson is still rehabbing from a left calf injury that has kept him out since late May. But the Blue Jays third baseman could be nearing his return.

Donaldson posted a video of himself running the bases with the caption "Getting closer!!" on his Instagram account Wednesday.

Tweet from @AaronBenRose: #BlueJays Josh Donaldson back running the bases 👀 Says he's "getting closer" on his Instagram (tos_bor20)������������������ pic.twitter.com/eHOsedmnDw

If he can return from the disabled list and prove to be even a fraction of the player he was from 2015-17, the 32-year-old could be an attractive trade candidate before Aug. 31.

MLB Network insider Jon Heyman broke down the market for Donaldson in an article for Fancred Sports earlier this month and listed the Indians, Cardinals, Braves, Cubs and Red Sox as potential landing spots for the impending free agent.

Heyman pegged the Indians -- who will have the first chance among those teams to claim Donaldson off waivers -- as the most likely of the five to acquire the third baseman.

While the Tribe has American League MVP candidate Jose Ramirez at the hot corner, it can shift him to second base and move Jason Kipnis to the outfield to help out a group that has been decimated by injuries and lost recent acquisition Leonys Martin to the disabled list with a bacterial infection last week.

Video: IT on Josh Donaldson's ability to help a playoff team

Jones reportedly clears revocable waivers, now eligible to be traded anywhere
Aug. 16: Adam Jones has passed through revocable waivers unclaimed, sources told MLB Network insider Jon Heyman, making the Orioles outfielder eligible to be traded to any of the other 29 teams.

Of course, a deal remains unlikely, as Jones used his 10-and-5 rights to veto a trade to the Phillies prior to the July 31 non-waiver Deadline, with family, friends and his community programs in Baltimore among the major reasons why, per Heyman.

Philadelphia's plan to have Jones platoon with lefty-swinging Nick Williams in right field may also have been a factor in Jones' refusal to approve a deal there, though the veteran hasn't indicated whether that is the case.

According to Heyman, the O's recently approached the Yankees to gauge their interest in Jones with Aaron Judge, Gary Sanchez and Clint Frazier on the disabled list, but New York is close to the luxury-tax threshold and would like to save that money in case any additional rotation solutions arise.

The Indians are another potential landing spot for Jones, as they are missing Leonys Martin, Lonnie Chisenhall and Tyler Naquin, and have received lackluster production from Melky Cabrera (.695 OPS), Brandon Guyer (.663 OPS), Rajai Davis (.601 OPS) and Greg Allen (.580 OPS).

Video: BAL@NYY: Jones on invoking no-trade clause with O's

With Nelson unlikely to return, will Brewers trade for starter?
Aug. 15: The Brewers have held out hope that Jimmy Nelson, who has missed this entire season while recovering from right shoulder surgery, would be a solution to the club's rotation problems after coming off the disabled list. But general manager David Stearns and manager Craig Counsell acknowledged Wednesday that Nelson is unlikely to pitch for the team this year.

Tweet from @AdamMcCalvy: Craig Counsell on Jimmy Nelson: ���Jimmy pitching for us this year is unlikely. And that���s not due to a setback of any nature, that���s just due to the pace of his rehab right now.��� pic.twitter.com/lPiSozK3F8

Faced with that reality, Stearns is keeping open the possibility of swinging a trade for a starter.

"There's still a lot of waiver activity," Stearns said. "Guys are getting through. Tough to handicap at this point, but we're looking, and if there's something that makes sense that we think materially impacts this team, we'll do it."

Tweet from @AdamMcCalvy: Stearns on prospect of trading for starter before Sept. 1: "There's still a lot of waiver activity. Guys are getting through. Tough to handicap at this point, but we're looking, and if there's something that makes sense that we think materially impacts this team, we'll do it."

The Brewers were one of the more active teams on the trade market before the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline, acquiring reliever Joakim Soria, third baseman Mike Moustakas and second baseman Jonathan Schoop.

They also reportedly discussed deals for a number of starters, including the Mets' Zack Wheeler and the Reds' Matt Harvey, but ultimately didn't come away with any of them.

Milwaukee is unlikely to have a chance to trade for Wheeler at this point, but Harvey, Twins right-hander Ervin Santana, Blue Jays right-hander Marco Estrada and White Sox right-hander James Shields could be available.

The question, of course, is whether any of those hurlers represents a significant upgrade over Zach Davies, who is nearing the conclusion of his rehab assignment.

Cutch, Holland among top August trade candidates
Aug. 14: The market has been relatively quiet since the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline, with Mike Fiers, Fernando Rodney and Justin Bour representing the biggest names to have been moved in August. But as MLB.com's Mark Feinsand wrote Tuesday, trade season is far from over.

And though they are still in the thick of the National League postseason race, the Giants could be an interesting team to watch. San Francisco entered Tuesday with a 60-60 record, putting it five games out in the NL West and 6 1/2 behind in the NL Wild Card chase. However, the Giants will need to leapfrog three other teams to win the division and six teams to grab the second NL Wild Card spot.

Giants outfielder Andrew McCutchen and left-hander Derek Holland each made Feinsand's list of 10 August trade candidates. Both players are set to become free agents this offseason.

Feinsand notes that the Blue Jays could be active on the trade market before Aug. 31 as well, with third baseman Josh Donaldson, outfielder Curtis Granderson and right-hander Marco Estrada among Toronto's most likely candidates to be dealt.

Reds right-hander Matt Harvey, White Sox right-hander James Shields, Twins right-hander Ervin Santana, Rays right-hander Sergio Romo and Tigers shortstop Jose Iglesias also made Feinsand's list. More >

Granderson reportedly clears revocable waivers
Aug. 14: Blue Jays outfielder Curtis Granderson, who was one of the 10 August trade candidates MLB.com's Mark Feinsand broke down Tuesday, has cleared revocable waivers and is free to be dealt anywhere, reports Robert Murray of The Athletic. 

Tweet from @ByRobertMurray: #BlueJays' Curtis Granderson has cleared revocable trade waivers, source tells The Athletic. He's free to be traded anywhere.

Granderson, who can become a free agent this offseason, owns a solid .766 OPS against right-handers in 2018. He also has extensive postseason experience, having played in the playoffs in seven seasons.

Granderson, 37, was part of an August trade just last season, going from the Mets to the Dodgers after passing through waivers unclaimed earlier in the month. More >

Bruce could be odd man out of Mets' outfield
Aug. 14: Jay Bruce is a name to monitor this month as the Mets could look to deal from their outfield surplus. Trading Bruce would open up time at the corners for Michael Conforto and Brandon Nimmo.

Bruce is nearing a return from a right hip injury that's sidelined him since June 17. Joel Sherman of the New York Post suggested Monday that Bruce could be dealt if he show's he's healthy before the end of the month, pointing to the Giants, Mariners, Rockies, Indians and Tigers as potential trade partners for the Mets.

Bruce has a five-team no-trade clause of the Orioles, Mariners, Rays, Blue Jays and A's, per Sherman, and two years, $28 million remaining on his contract after this season. He's batting .212/.292/.613 with three homers and 17 RBIs through 62 games this season.

Will Dodgers look to trade market to bolster injury-plagued bullpen?
Aug. 14: The Dodgers are down another reliever, with John Axford set to join Kenley Jansen, Tony Cingrani, Josh Fields, Yimi Garcia and Daniel Hudson on the disabled list after suffering a fractured tibia when he was hit by a comebacker Sunday.

While Los Angeles recently moved starters Kenta Maeda and Ross Stripling to the bullpen to help out its beleaguered relief corps, it's possible the club will look to swing an August trade for some bullpen help.

The problem? There might not be many attractive options available.

Sergio Romo, Jim Johnson and Tyler Clippard pitch for AL teams, meaning the Dodgers will be one of the last clubs that has a chance to claim them, based on the waiver-priority rules. Those hurlers might not even make it out of the AL before being claimed, as was the case with Fernando Rodney, who was traded to the A's last Thursday after being snagged off waivers from the Twins.

As for NL relievers, pitchers such as Bud Norris, Kirby Yates, Craig Stammen, Jared Hughes and David Hernandez also have a good chance of being claimed before the Dodgers have the opportunity to grab them.

Tigers southpaw Francisco Liriano reportedly cleared waivers already, but he's unlikely to draw interest as anything more than a lefty specialist. Liriano has held same-sided hitters to a .567 OPS since the outset of 2017, but right-handed batters have posted an .849 mark against him in that time.

Video: LAD@COL: Friedman provides update on Jansen

Marlins remain open to trading more veterans
Aug. 13: While the Marlins have traded Dee Gordon, Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, Christian Yelich, Cameron Maybin, Brad Ziegler and Justin Bour in less than nine months, they might not be done dealing.

According to the Miami Herald's Barry Jackson, the Marlins remain open to moving some veterans before Aug. 31, with infielder/outfielder Derek Dietrich, second baseman Starlin Castro and right-hander Dan Straily among the most likely candidates to be dealt.

Dietrich could draw more suitors than the other two, as he has considerable experience at three positions (2B, 3B, LF), owns a 116 OPS+ over the past four seasons and is controllable through 2020. Per Jackson, the Cubs and Indians inquired about the 29-year-old during July.

Meanwhile, Jackson writes that "no team expressed serious interest" in Castro, who is owed nearly $12 million in '19 and has a team option for $16 million with a $1 million buyout for '20, before the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline. And though the A's discussed a Straily trade with the Marlins last month, Oakland has since acquired Mike Fiers from the Tigers.

The 29-year-old Straily has two more seasons of arbitration eligibility remaining after this one before he can become a free agent, which helps his trade value. But teams may be hesitant to give up notable prospects for a pitcher who has recorded a lifetime 4.27 ERA with a 4.81 FIP (4.42 ERA, 5.40 FIP in '18).

10 August trade candidates for contenders

MLB.com

It has been nearly two weeks since the non-waiver Trade Deadline, but trade season is far from over.

Since the clock struck 4 p.m. ET on July 31, multiple contenders have bolstered their roster for a postseason run with post-Deadline deals. The Athletics have been the busiest, adding Mike Fiers, Fernando Rodney and Shawn Kelley, while the Phillies traded for Justin Bour and the Pirates acquired Adeiny Hechavarria.

It has been nearly two weeks since the non-waiver Trade Deadline, but trade season is far from over.

Since the clock struck 4 p.m. ET on July 31, multiple contenders have bolstered their roster for a postseason run with post-Deadline deals. The Athletics have been the busiest, adding Mike Fiers, Fernando Rodney and Shawn Kelley, while the Phillies traded for Justin Bour and the Pirates acquired Adeiny Hechavarria.

Some players cleared waivers, while others were dealt to the club that claimed them. Either way, more players figure to be on the move during the next two-plus weeks.

As a reminder, teams can place players on revocable trade waivers, which means the player can be claimed by any club. Waiver priority is determined by reverse standings in the player's league, following by reverse standings in the other league.

If a player is claimed, his original club can either work out a trade with the claiming club within 48 hours, allow the player -- and his entire contract -- to go to the club, or pull the player back off waivers. Once a player is pulled back off waivers, he can be placed on trade waivers a second time, though the request then becomes irrevocable.

Should a player pass through waivers unclaimed, he can then be traded to any club without any restrictions. Any players on the 40-man roster involved in the trade must also have cleared waivers.

Players acquired before the end of August are eligible to be on the postseason roster, so we could see action right up until 11:59 p.m. on Aug. 31, which was right about the time Justin Verlander was dealt to the Astros last year, changing the shape of the entire postseason.

With that in mind, here are 10 names to watch in the coming weeks.

Josh Donaldson, 3B, age 32
The former American League MVP Award winner hasn't played since May 28 thanks to a calf injury, but all indications are he is getting close to a return from the disabled list. Donaldson won't have much time to prove he's healthy before Aug. 31, but a contender in need of an impact bat might be willing to roll the dice on Donaldson, who is owed a little less than $7 million for the rest of the season.
Contract: Free agent this offseason

Matt Harvey, RHP, age 29
That Harvey is still pitching for the Reds in mid-August is one of the great upsets of the season. The right-hander was gaining momentum leading up to the Deadline before getting blown out by the Pirates on July 22, causing some contenders to wonder whether he'd be an upgrade for their rotation. August didn't start out much better, as the Nationals tagged Harvey with a loss, but he bounced back with seven innings of two-run ball against the D-backs on Saturday. He's owed about $1.7 million more this season, which is a reasonable gamble for a team seeking a starter.
Contract: Free agent this offseason

Video: ARI@CIN: Harvey strikes out 7 over 7 strong frames

Andrew McCutchen, OF, age 31
McCutchen's name was thrown around quite a bit before the Deadline, yet he remained with San Francisco as the Giants lingered in the postseason picture. They remain only five games off the National League West pace, but at 60-60, things don't look promising. Should San Francisco fall further, it could look to move McCutchen, who is owed just under $4.5 million for the rest of 2018.
Contract: Free agent this offseason

Video: PIT@SF: McCutchen leads off with homer to right

Derek Holland, LHP, age 31
Holland might not clear waivers, as he's owed about $500,000 over the final six-plus weeks of the season, but we've seen teams work out deals with claiming clubs. As with McCutchen, things would likely need to take a turn for the worse for San Francisco for players to be moved, but Holland has posted a 3.57 ERA in four starts since returning to the rotation on July 25, making him a good back-end depth candidate.
Contract: Free agent this offseason

Video: SF@SEA: Holland strikes out 4 over 6 strong frames

James Shields, RHP, age 36
A couple of spotty July outings may have prevented teams from taking a chance on Shields, but "Big Game James" has pitched well in his two August starts, posting a 2.77 ERA. His 4-14 record is deceiving: In Shields' 15 quality starts this season, Shields is 3-5 with seven no-decisions. The right-hander is owed a little more than $6 million this season.
Contract: $16 million club option for 2019 ($2 million buyout)

Video: CWS@SEA: Shields K's 5 over 7 strong vs. the Mariners

Ervin Santana, RHP, age 35
Santana has not pitched particularly well since making his season debut on July 25, posting a 6.53 ERA in his four starts. The Twins -- who have already unloaded Brian Dozier, Eduardo Escobar, Ryan Pressly, Lance Lynn, Zach Duke and Rodney in recent weeks -- might be willing to pay some of the $4 million owed to Santana for the rest of 2018. Remember: this is a guy who received AL Cy Young Award votes a year ago and started the American League Wild Card Game for Minnesota.
Contract: $14 million club option (no buyout)

Video: MIN@TOR: Santana fans Gurriel Jr. for first K of 2018

Curtis Granderson, OF, age 37
The veteran slugger is owed about $1.5 million more this season, and while Granderson is no longer the power threat who averaged nearly 30 homers a year from 2009-17, he can certainly help a team off the bench or as an injury fill-in. He also provides a solid clubhouse presence and has been to the postseason seven times in his career.
Contract: Free agent this offseason

Video: TOR@CWS: Granderson leads off the game with a homer

Marco Estrada, RHP, age 35
Estrada has had an up-and-down season, so while he won't be a difference-maker for a contending team, he can fill a back-end rotation spot or provide some insurance. He twirled seven innings of one-run, one-hit ball on Aug. 4 in Seattle, showing he has something left in the tank. Estrada is owed about $4 million for the rest of the season.
Contract: Free agent this offseason

Video: TOR@SEA: Estrada dominates over 7-plus one-hit frames

Sergio Romo, RHP, age 35
The Rays' closer (and occasional opener) has pitched exceptionally well since the beginning of June, posting a 1.71 ERA in 33 appearances. Romo has struck out a batter per inning during that stretch and would be a quality addition to any bullpen. He's owed about $750,000 for the rest of the season.
Contract: Free agent this offseason

Video: TB@TOR: Romo locks down his 99th career save

Jose Iglesias, SS, age 28
Iglesias has reportedly cleared waivers already, meaning he can be traded at any point. His overall numbers are nothing special, but he has crushed lefties to the tune of a .909 OPS this season, making him a solid candidate for a platoon or bench spot. Iglesias is owed about $1.9 million for the rest of 2018.
Contract: Free agent this offseason

Video: MIN@DET: Iglesias drives 2-run smash to left

Mark Feinsand, executive reporter for MLB.com, has covered the Yankees and MLB since 2001 for the New York Daily News and MLB.com.

As Deadline passes, Crew could still add starter

Club aims to potentially bolster rotation; Schoop reports, starts vs. Dodgers
MLB.com

LOS ANGELES -- Jonathan Schoop arrived at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday and became the third high-profile player in a week to circle the Brewers' clubhouse shaking hands with his new teammates. Reliever Joakim Soria and third baseman Mike Moustakas did the same days earlier.

However, Brewers general manager David Stearns did not find a starting pitcher ahead of Tuesday's non-waiver Trade Deadline to bolster a surprisingly solid, but not particularly deep, Brewers rotation, despite working hard on a number of fronts and coming very close on one particular player. Stearns opted not to name him.

View Full Game Coverage

LOS ANGELES -- Jonathan Schoop arrived at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday and became the third high-profile player in a week to circle the Brewers' clubhouse shaking hands with his new teammates. Reliever Joakim Soria and third baseman Mike Moustakas did the same days earlier.

However, Brewers general manager David Stearns did not find a starting pitcher ahead of Tuesday's non-waiver Trade Deadline to bolster a surprisingly solid, but not particularly deep, Brewers rotation, despite working hard on a number of fronts and coming very close on one particular player. Stearns opted not to name him.

View Full Game Coverage

He'll keep working on it.

"We still have August," Stearns said.

That's right -- the end of July is baseball's non-waiver Deadline, not a hard cap to trade season. Teams can still deal players, provided they clear waivers first, and there are a number of starting pitchers among the potential candidates. MLB.com's Mark Feinsand included three on his list of 10 who could still be traded: Matt Harvey of the Reds, Ervin Santana of the Twins and James Shields of the White Sox.

Whether any of those players represent an upgrade over what the Brewers already have is open for debate. Through Wade Miley's seven scoreless innings in Tuesday's 1-0 win over the Dodgers, Milwaukee's starters rank seventh in the Majors with a 3.80 ERA. And the Brewers had 63 quality starts entering Wednesday, trailing only the Astros.

That might surprise some outsiders, considering the Brewers don't have any aces like Justin Verlander on their staff. Instead, they have a current five-man rotation of Jhoulys Chacin, Chase Anderson, Junior Guerra, Freddy Peralta and Miley, with right-hander Zach Davies scheduled to throw a second of at least three Minor League rehab starts on Wednesday night as he works through a back injury and Brandon Woodruff in reserve at Triple-A Colorado Springs.

Stearns acknowledged that the Brewers' own view of their rotation is more optimistic than outsiders' "and that's fine," he said. Lorenzo Cain weighed in on the matter after Miley's gem, saying, "For me, the pitching has been carrying our team all year long. That speaks for itself."

Still, adding depth at the right price would not hurt. Jimmy Nelson, the team's best starting pitcher a year ago, remains in rehab mode following shoulder surgery. He threw breaking balls for the first time during a Dodger Stadium session on Wednesday, but is not quite ready to pitch at full strength off a mound. The Brewers don't know whether Nelson will pitch for them this season. Left-hander Brent Suter, who has been valuable as a swingman in recent seasons, is out for the year after undergoing Tommy John surgery on Tuesday.

Tweet from @AdamMcCalvy: Here���s how Jimmy Nelson looked in the Dodger Stadium bullpen on Tuesday. First time throwing breaking balls since surgery. pic.twitter.com/ENKCG3p0xF

So, Stearns did some shopping.

"When you're talking about potentially acquiring an elite, controllable player -- regardless of position -- other teams are going to target the top of your system," Stearns said. "In certain cases, we thought that was appropriate, and in other cases, we weren't willing to go there.

"We've proven that when we feel the time is right, we're willing to deal from the top of our system. We did it in the case of Christian Yelich. We think that was a transaction that was worth making. In these cases, we just couldn't line up with the teams that had the controllable starting pitching to make deals that we thought were in our best interest."

Among the controllable pitchers the Brewers pursued were the Rays' Chris Archer and the Orioles' Kevin Gausman, but Archer went to the Pirates and Gausman to the Braves. Either pitcher would have probably required Stearns to part with one or more of the team's top four prospects per MLB Pipeline -- infielder Keston Hiura, pitchers Corbin Burnes and Peralta and outfielder Corey Ray.

Stearns didn't find a deal to his liking, so with moments to go before the Deadline, he got Schoop from the Orioles for infielder Jonathan Villar and Minor Leaguers Luis Ortiz and Jean Carmona.

Schoop checked in Wednesday and batted cleanup as the Brewers' second baseman.

"My agent kind of told me, 'Don't be surprised if they trade you. Be ready for it,'" Schoop said. "It was 50-50. I was expecting it a little bit."

With the lineup and bullpen strengthened, Stearns will keep working on the rotation. He suggested that some of the pitchers he targeted didn't get traded.

Stearns expects August to be busy with trades around baseball.

"We had numbers of parallel paths, and we certainly had a number of conversations revolving around pitchers; some of whom were traded and many of whom were not," Stearns said. "We did think it was important for us to focus on potentially adding a starter. We were unable to do that at this point, but we still have the August trade period to see if there's something out there that makes sense for us."

Adam McCalvy has covered the Brewers for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @AdamMcCalvy and like him on Facebook.

Milwaukee Brewers

Marlins may explore trades during waivers period

Several veterans received interest from clubs before non-waiver Deadline
MLB.com

ATLANTA -- As one trade window closes, another opens.

Through Aug. 31, Major League clubs can continue to make trades, but only after the player first clears waivers. Wednesday started the revocable waivers trade period.

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ATLANTA -- As one trade window closes, another opens.

Through Aug. 31, Major League clubs can continue to make trades, but only after the player first clears waivers. Wednesday started the revocable waivers trade period.

View Full Game Coverage

This means the Marlins can continue to explore trade options even after Tuesday's passing of the non-waiver Trade Deadline.

"August is still an opportunity to make moves," Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill said. "We don't have the ability to do so without having waivers secured, but it's always an opportunity to potentially find a way to improve your organization."

Miami players most likely to be dealt in August are second baseman Starlin Castro, left fielder Derek Dietrich, first baseman Justin Bour and right-hander Dan Straily.

The Marlins fielded calls on each of these veterans before Tuesday's Deadline. Contending clubs may have interest in those players in the upcoming weeks. The market for these veterans may hinge on whether injuries occur to teams in the postseason race.

Video: MIA@TB: Dietrich crushes 2 big homers vs. the Rays

Before July 31, players could be traded without first clearing waivers. Now, the process is different.

Teams can place players on revocable trade waivers, which means the player can be claimed by any club. Waiver priority is determined by reverse standings in the player's league, followed by reverse standings in the other league.

If a player is claimed, his original club can either work out a trade with the claiming club within 48 hours, allow the player -- and his entire contract -- to go to the club or pull the player back off waivers. Once a player is pulled back off waivers, he can be placed on trade waivers a second time, though the request then becomes irrevocable.

Should a player pass through waivers unclaimed, he can then be traded to any club without any restrictions. Any players on the 40-man roster involved in the trade must also have cleared waivers.

In the final two months, the Marlins likely will start giving young players more opportunities. That has already been the case with rookie Magneuris Sierra, who recently got called up from Triple-A New Orleans. The 22-year-old will play mostly center and left field. Isaac Galloway, after spending 10 1/2 years in the Minor Leagues, received his first big league callup on Tuesday, and the 28-year-old can play all three outfield spots.

Video: MIA@ATL: Galloway singles in his 1st career at-bat

The Marlins on Tuesday completed two trades before the non-waiver Trade Deadline: reliever Brad Ziegler was dealt to the D-backs for Double-A right-hander Tommy Eveld, and outfielder Cameron Maybin was moved to the Mariners for middle infielder Bryson Brigman and $250,000 of international bonus pool money.

Eveld will report to Double-A Jacksonville and Brigman will join Class A Advanced Jupiter, where he will get a shot at both shortstop and second base.

Like they've done with all their player evaluations, the Marlins are leaning heavily on their upgraded analytics department.

Video: MIA@ATL: Chattin on Brigman's arm, Eveld's defense

Eveld and Brigman fit the profile the player development department is seeking: athletic, middle-of-the-field players and pitchers who show movement on their pitches as well as the ability to miss bats.

Eveld has an upper 90-mph fastball, with a four-seam spin rate average of 2,450 rpm, above the MLB average of about 2,200. Through tracking data, Eveld gets misses on 25 percent of his fastballs up in the zone.

Brigman has the potential to be an everyday shortstop or second baseman who makes consistent contact. The 23-year-old has a 14 percent strikeout rate. Eventually, he may wind up at second base, but for now, he will get plenty of chances at shortstop.

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.

Miami Marlins

Bryce to Tribe? Indians pursued deal before Deadline

Cleveland reportedly balked at including righty Shane Bieber in trade
MLB.com

While Tuesday was highlighted by a whirlwind of noteworthy deals leading right up to 4 p.m. ET, the 2018 non-waiver Trade Deadline will also be remembered for the big name that stayed put: the Nationals' Bryce Harper.

However, the superstar outfielder may have been closer to being moved than many realize. The destination? Cleveland.

While Tuesday was highlighted by a whirlwind of noteworthy deals leading right up to 4 p.m. ET, the 2018 non-waiver Trade Deadline will also be remembered for the big name that stayed put: the Nationals' Bryce Harper.

However, the superstar outfielder may have been closer to being moved than many realize. The destination? Cleveland.

Trade Deadline recap: Every team's moves

According to Jayson Stark, multiple sources told The Athletic (subscription required) that the Indians were "in deep conversations" with Washington about Harper "before the Nationals pulled back the FOR SALE sign."

If Cleveland had been willing to include young right-hander Shane Bieber -- the Tribe balked at that request, per MLB.com's Jon Paul Morosi, who initially wrote about the club's interest in Harper on Monday -- the outcome might have been different.

On Wednesday morning, Bieber, who has recorded a 4.73 ERA (3.40 FIP) over 51 1/3 innings with the Indians as a rookie this season, commented on Cleveland's reported refusal to put him in a deal for Harper.

"There wasn't much reaction, just because there were no legs to it," Bieber told MLB.com's Jordan Bastian. "It's a pretty cool thing to see. It's always nice to have commitment from the club. The Indians have been nothing but great to me. They're great to everybody in the organization, through and through, from when you first get drafted until when you're with them for however many years. All the guys have nothing but high regards for the organization. It's definitely nice to hear, but there wasn't much to it."

The Nationals are in the midst of a disappointing season, but the chances of them trading Harper -- one of their many veterans on expiring contracts -- seemed almost nonexistent up until Monday night, when MLB.com's Mark Feinsand reported that Washington was making it known to other teams that the slugger was available.

As Tuesday dawned, the baseball world was abuzz about the chances of a Harper blockbuster, but that enthusiasm was quickly dispelled by general manager Mike Rizzo's declaration that Harper wasn't going anywhere.

Video: Harper on trade talks, happy to remain with Nationals

Per Feinsand, a source with knowledge of the situation said that Cleveland was one of several teams to contact the Nats about Harper. The Indians ultimately acquired Leonys Martin from the Tigers to shore up an outfield that has been a notable weak spot this season.

The Nats could always revisit a Harper trade in August, but the Indians are unlikely to have another opportunity to deal for him. In order for that to happen, Harper would need to go unclaimed on waivers by the other 14 National League teams and then every AL team with a worse record than Cleveland's, per MLB's waiver rules.

Harper, 25, has hit just .226 in 2018, but he ranks among the NL leaders in homers (25, tied for third) and walks (85, first) and has produced an .855 OPS. He's earning $21.65 million this season, his final year before free agency.

Thomas Harrigan is an editor for MLB.com.

What Phillies' trades mean for Nick Pivetta

MLB.com

PHILADELPHIA -- The Phillies' actions before Tuesday's non-waiver Trade Deadline proved that their faith in Nick Pivetta and the rest of the rotation remains unbowed.

Pivetta will make his 22nd start of the season Thursday night against the Marlins at Citizens Bank Park. He had been one of the Phillies' most encouraging developments through May. But after he went 4-3 with a 3.26 ERA in his first 11 starts, he is 1-6 with a 6.84 ERA in his last 10.

PHILADELPHIA -- The Phillies' actions before Tuesday's non-waiver Trade Deadline proved that their faith in Nick Pivetta and the rest of the rotation remains unbowed.

Pivetta will make his 22nd start of the season Thursday night against the Marlins at Citizens Bank Park. He had been one of the Phillies' most encouraging developments through May. But after he went 4-3 with a 3.26 ERA in his first 11 starts, he is 1-6 with a 6.84 ERA in his last 10.

But the Phillies didn't add to the rotation at the Deadline, even with starters like Chris Archer, Cole Hamels and J.A. Happ on the move, because they trust the numbers and believe in Pivetta's stuff. They instead acquired infielder Asdrubal Cabrera, catcher Wilson Ramos and left-hander Aaron Loup. If they make more moves before the Aug. 31 waiver Trade Deadline, it figures to be a bench player or another bullpen arm.

"It's not just comfort," Phillies general manager Matt Klentak said Tuesday. "We are really excited about our starting pitching. No matter how you measure it, our starting five have been among the better starting fives in all of baseball this year. I recognize that that's not every single night, but the total body of work puts us at or near the top."

The Phillies' rotation has a 3.81 ERA, which ranks eighth in baseball. It is seventh in WHIP (1.22) and seventh in strikeout-to-walk ratio (3.25). It averages 0.98 home runs per nine innings, which is the third-best mark in baseball.

Those are some of the more traditional stats.

The Phillies look at other numbers, too. The rotation is third in MLB in WAR (12.2), according to FanGraphs. It is fifth in xFIP (3.76).

Video: PHI@CIN: Pivetta strikes out Votto, the side in 1st

The Phillies simply believe Pivetta will turn things around. He has struck out 67 and walked 18 in 49 2/3 innings in this current 10-start stretch. Those are like his early-season numbers, when he struck out 67 and walked 14 in 58 innings.

The biggest difference? Pivetta has allowed 11 home runs in his past 10 starts. He allowed five in his first 11.

"I think there is some chance involved," Phillies manager Gabe Kapler said last weekend. "First you have to hang a pitch or throw a very hittable pitch. And then the batter has to throw a swing on it where he squares it up. And then it's got to go in the air rather than on the ground, so there's some chance involved in it. I'm not saying that's all there is, but he certainly has the capability to make better pitches and locate his balls better. And that's probably the No. 1 most important factor."

And that is why the Phillies never seriously pursued Archer, Hamels or Happ. They could have bumped Pivetta to the bullpen for the stretch drive. Teams have bumped promising young starters, even established ones (remember Pedro Martinez bumping Jamie Moyer to the 'pen in 2009?), before. But not these Phillies.

They will move forward with what they have, believing they have enough depth in Triple-A to cover them.

"You've heard me say it before and I'm happy to repeat it: If you can stay out of the trade market for starting pitching at the Trade Deadline, you should do that, because it tends to be very expensive," Klentak said.

Todd Zolecki has covered the Phillies since 2003, and for MLB.com since 2009. Follow him on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

Philadelphia Phillies, Nick Pivetta

10 players who could be traded during August

MLB.com

The trading frenzy has quieted to a calm following Tuesday's 4 p.m. ET non-waiver Trade Deadline, but that doesn't mean there won't be more deals over the next month.

Remember that the most impactful deal last summer took place on Aug. 31, when the Astros acquired Justin Verlander from the Tigers moments before the calendar flipped to September.

The trading frenzy has quieted to a calm following Tuesday's 4 p.m. ET non-waiver Trade Deadline, but that doesn't mean there won't be more deals over the next month.

Remember that the most impactful deal last summer took place on Aug. 31, when the Astros acquired Justin Verlander from the Tigers moments before the calendar flipped to September.

If you're not familiar with the rules for August trades, here's the deal: Teams can place players on revocable trade waivers, which means the player can be claimed by any club. Waiver priority is determined by reverse standings in the player's league, followed by reverse standings in the other league.

If a player is claimed, his original club can either work out a trade with the claiming club within 48 hours, allow the player -- and his entire contract -- to go to the club, or pull the player back off waivers. Once a player is pulled back off waivers, he can be placed on trade waivers a second time, though the request then becomes irrevocable.

Should a player pass through waivers unclaimed, he can then be traded to any club without any restrictions. Any players on the 40-man roster involved in the trade must also have cleared waivers.

Although players can technically be traded through the end of the season, Aug. 31 is considered to be the unofficial deadline, because players acquired after that date are not eligible to be on a postseason roster.

Video: Rizzo says Nationals will not trade Bryce Harper

With all of that in mind, which players might be candidates to be traded in August? Here are 10 names to watch.

Bryce Harper, Nationals OF
Monday night's news that the Nationals had been gauging interest in Harper sent the rumor mill into a frenzy, so much so that general manager Mike Rizzo felt compelled to say publicly that he was not trading Harper and that he believed in his team. But the fact remains that Washington was indeed taking the temperature of potential buyers, opening the door for a Harper trade.

Video: Martinez, Rizzo on Trade Deadline decisions

If the first couple weeks of August find the Nationals plummeting further in the National League East standings, Rizzo could find himself shopping Harper again. With more than $7 million still owed to Harper, it's unlikely that a non-contender would claim the former NL Most Valuable Player Award winner, but a contender could see a unique opportunity to add a top talent for the stretch run. Chances are this won't happen, but it can't be ruled out, either.

Video: Harper on trade talks, happy to remain with Nationals

Josh Donaldson, Blue Jays 3B
Once considered a prime candidate to be traded by July 31, the former American League MVP Award winner hasn't played since May 28, leaving his trade value in limbo. Donaldson is aiming for a return from the disabled list in a couple weeks, and if he shows he can contribute to a contender, the Blue Jays may move him before Aug. 31. Donaldson is owed more than $7 million for the remainder of the season and is slated to hit free agency this winter.

Video: TEX@ARI: Beltre makes a pair of barehanded plays

Adrian Beltre, Rangers 3B
Several teams expressed interest in the Texas mainstay, who had full control over his future thanks to his 10-and-5 rights. The Braves and Red Sox were among the teams that talked to the Rangers about Beltre, but he was not moved before the Deadline. The 39-year-old is still in search of his first World Series championship, and if a contending team makes a push for him, he might be moved to accept a deal. Beltre, who is owed about $6 million over the final two months, will be a free agent after the season.

Adam Jones, Orioles OF
Jones has spent 11 of his 13 big league seasons in Baltimore. With his family rooted there and a decade of personal history, Jones -- who reportedly shot down an opportunity to go to the Phillies -- might choose to exercise his 10-and-5 rights and veto any deal in order to finish his Orioles career on his own terms. Jones, an impending free agent who is extremely unlikely to re-sign in Baltimore, is owed a little less than $6 million for the remainder of the season.

Video: PHI@CIN: Harvey hurls a pair of high-90s fastballs

Matt Harvey, Reds RHP
Possibly the most surprising name not to move on Tuesday, Harvey could be a prime August trade candidate. The right-hander has been better -- albeit not close to his prime self -- since moving from the Mets to the Reds, posting a 4.44 ERA in 14 starts with Cincinnati. Harvey is owed about $1.9 million for the rest of the season, but he may be able to clear waivers, based on the fact that no teams made a move for him before the Deadline.

Video: SF@SD: Cutch launches a solo homer to right field

Andrew McCutchen, Giants OF
The former NL MVP Award winner was a popular name on Tuesday, though the Giants opted not to move him. The Phillies, Indians and Yankees were all reported to have interest in the outfielder, and any of those contenders could revisit talks with San Francisco if McCutchen -- who is owed just shy of $5 million for the remainder of 2018 -- clears waivers.

Ervin Santana, Twins RHP
The right-hander has made only two starts since returning from finger surgery, making it difficult for the Twins to move him before July 31. Santana, who posted a 3.32 ERA from 2016-17 for Minnesota, could become a valued asset if he puts a few good starts together this month. The 35-year-old is owed about $4.5 million for the rest of this year, with a $14.5 million club option for 2019.

Video: KC@CWS: Shields fans Mondesi in the 3rd inning

James Shields, White Sox RHP
Shields has been a steady presence in the White Sox rotation, throwing at least six innings in 17 of his 22 starts entering Tuesday, 13 of them quality starts. With a 4.53 ERA, Shields isn't likely to be a difference-maker, but he can provide some back-end stability for a contender, especially one that sustains an injury in the rotation. The 36-year-old is owed about $7 million over the final two months and has a $16 million club option with a $2 million buyout, so the White Sox would likely need to include some cash to offset the salary.

Video: TEX@ARI: Choo hits 2 homers, drives in 4 runs

Shin-Soo Choo, Rangers OF
The 36-year-old outfielder/DH is having one of the best seasons of his career, posting a .280/.392/.491 slash line with 20 home runs entering Tuesday. Choo could help a contender -- especially one in the AL -- with a steady left-handed bat, though his price tag -- he's owed about $6.5 million for the rest of 2018 and has two more years on his deal at $21 million each -- make it a lock that he'd clear waivers and a long shot that the Rangers would be able to move him.

Devin Mesoraco, Mets C
The Mets tried to deal Mesoraco before the Deadline, but couldn't find any takers. Given his high salary -- he's owed a little more than $4 million over the final two months -- it's hard to imagine him not clearing waivers. But a team with a catching injury could be inclined to roll the dice on the 30-year-old, who hit 25 home runs during his lone All-Star season in 2014.

Mark Feinsand, executive reporter for MLB.com, has covered the Yankees and MLB since 2001 for the New York Daily News and MLB.com.

Adrian Beltre, Shin-Soo Choo, Josh Donaldson, Bryce Harper, Matt Harvey, Adam Jones, Andrew McCutchen, Devin Mesoraco, Ervin Santana, James Shields

Twins deal Dozier to LA for Forsythe, prospects

MLB.com

MINNEAPOLIS -- The Twins made their fifth and final deal before Tuesday's non-waiver Trade Deadline, sending second baseman Brian Dozier to the Dodgers for veteran second baseman Logan Forsythe and prospects Devin Smeltzer and Luke Raley.

Dozier, perhaps the club's most popular player over the last five seasons, had become one of the faces of the franchise, along with Joe Mauer, after developing into a power-hitting All-Star second baseman and a clubhouse leader. But he will become a free agent after the season, and the Twins weren't going to re-sign him, so they decided to move him to the Dodgers, who had been linked to Dozier before the '17 season.

View Full Game Coverage

MINNEAPOLIS -- The Twins made their fifth and final deal before Tuesday's non-waiver Trade Deadline, sending second baseman Brian Dozier to the Dodgers for veteran second baseman Logan Forsythe and prospects Devin Smeltzer and Luke Raley.

Dozier, perhaps the club's most popular player over the last five seasons, had become one of the faces of the franchise, along with Joe Mauer, after developing into a power-hitting All-Star second baseman and a clubhouse leader. But he will become a free agent after the season, and the Twins weren't going to re-sign him, so they decided to move him to the Dodgers, who had been linked to Dozier before the '17 season.

View Full Game Coverage

"It's a very difficult day on a lot of fronts," Twins chief baseball officer Derek Falvey said. "Brian has been a meaningful part of this franchise. This an opportunity for him to go to a winning ballclub that was in the World Series last year and with their roster is looking to maybe finish it off this time. We just felt like for us as an organization, this was the right time to make this decision. We were able to acquire some talent we feel can help us build toward a championship future."

Dozier joins Eduardo Escobar (D-backs), Ryan Pressly (Astros), Zach Duke (Mariners) and Lance Lynn (Yankees) as those traded by Minnesota prior to the Trade Deadline, bringing back 11 prospects and Forsythe. Pressly was under contract through next year, but the rest were all going to be free agents after the season. The Twins hung onto closer Fernando Rodney, as they have a $4.25 million club option on him for next season, and right-hander Kyle Gibson, who remains under team control through next year.

• Twins add 4 prospects in Duke, Lynn trades

Video: Twins improve their system with recent trades

"It's been tough," said Mauer, who was never asked to waiver his no-trade clause. "We've lost some really good people, some really good players and really close friends. It's disappointing on a lot of levels. But I understand. It's a business, and I don't like to say that, but it really is when things like this happen. But I try not to worry about things I can't control. "

Dozier, an eighth-round Draft pick in 2009, was a success story in Minnesota, winning the organization's Minor League Player of the Year Award in 2012 before unexpectedly becoming a power hitter in the Majors and a fan favorite. He participated in the Home Run Derby in '14, was an All-Star in '15, hit a career-high 42 homers in '16 and won a Gold Glove Award in '17. He had expressed interest in signing an extension prior to this season, but the front office never approached him or his agent about a potential new contract.

"I think the reality of it always stings a little bit more than as you think about it potentially going down," Twins manager Paul Molitor said about Dozier. "Kind of like with Esco, you've got a guy who's just meant a lot to this organization. He's been here since '09, I believe when we drafted him, and just been an integral part of what the Twins have been about here at least the last handful of years."

Tweet from @Twins: Thanks for everything you���ve done for the #MNTwins organization over the years, Doz! Best of luck on the West Coast. pic.twitter.com/TbPsfQxIqW

Raley, 23, is the headliner for the Twins, as he ranked as the Dodgers' No. 19 prospect, per MLB Pipeline. The left-handed-hitting first baseman/outfielder is having a solid year at Double-A Tulsa, hitting .275/.345/.477 with 17 homers, 17 doubles and 53 RBIs in 93 games. He's expected to move into an outfield role with Double-A Chattanooga.

"I think he's really developed into that power, the last year-plus," Falvey said. "He's somebody we think going to Double-A is not unlike a Brent Rooker. He really gives us a chance to add some power to our lineup."

Smeltzer, 22, has posted a 4.73 ERA with 67 strikeouts and 19 walks in 83 2/3 innings at Double-A. He had been starting early in the season but moved to relief in July.

Forsythe, 31, was included in the deal because he's making the same salary as Dozier this season ($9 million) and the Dodgers wanted to avoid going over the luxury tax. He also gives the Twins a veteran infielder for the second half, but he's hitting .207/.270/.290 with two homers and 13 RBIs in 70 games this season. He's expected the join the roster on Wednesday.

"He's going to get plenty of chances to play, I would imagine, in the short term," Molitor said. "I'll have an opportunity to get a chance to look at some different people in different roles."

While Forsythe couldn't join the roster in time for Tuesday's game, reliever Trevor May was called up from Triple-A Rochester to take the place of Duke. It marked May's return to the Majors after undergoing Tommy John surgery in March 2017. He had a 4.00 ERA with 25 strikeouts and 16 walks in 27 innings at Triple-A Rochester.

"It's been a long road for me, just personally, and it doesn't always work out this way," May said. "So it's good to get the opportunity again. I made a pact with myself to get out of my own way, and I'm going to give myself every opportunity to earn a spot and keep it for a long, long time."

Rhett Bollinger has covered the Twins for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @RhettBollinger and Facebook.

Minnesota Twins, Brian Dozier, Logan Forsythe

Trade Talk: Archer, Gausman, Dozier, Harvey

The latest news and rumors leading up to today's non-waiver Trade Deadline
MLB.com

As today's 4 p.m. ET non-waiver Trade Deadline approaches, we'll keep you up to date with the latest news, buzz, rumors and more.

Pirates reportedly 'have deal in place' for Archer
July 31: After years of being a regular on the rumor mill, Chris Archer finally is being traded, according to numerous reports. The Pirates appear to be the landing spot, as they "have a deal in place," Stephen J. Nesbitt of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports.

As today's 4 p.m. ET non-waiver Trade Deadline approaches, we'll keep you up to date with the latest news, buzz, rumors and more.

Pirates reportedly 'have deal in place' for Archer
July 31: After years of being a regular on the rumor mill, Chris Archer finally is being traded, according to numerous reports. The Pirates appear to be the landing spot, as they "have a deal in place," Stephen J. Nesbitt of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports.

Tweet from @stephenjnesbitt: I���m told the Pirates have a deal in place to acquire Chris Archer.

That syncs with what others had been hearing leading up to the Deadline.

Tweet from @JeffPassan: Source: Chris Archer to the Pittsburgh Pirates is done.

Tweet from @TBTimes_Rays: BREAKING: Under deal being finalized, #Rays trade Archer to #Pirates for Glasnow, Meadows and a still being decided 3rd piece

MLB Network insider Joel Sherman reported that the Pirates were "in front" in talks for Archer. 

Tweet from @Joelsherman1: #Pirates are in front for Archer with 52 minutes to go to deadline. Told that is way #Rays are leaning.

ESPN's Buster Olney had the same, noting that Pittsburgh and the Rays were "deep in talks." 

Tweet from @Buster_ESPN: Industry sources say Pirates remain deep in talks with Rays about right-hander Chris Archer.

Archer is controllable through 2021 on a remarkably team-friendly salary -- signed for just $7.7 million in '19 with club options for '20 and '21 totaling only $20 million.

O's deal Gausman to Braves, Schoop to Brewers
July 31: While they had already moved a number of their trade pieces prior to Tuesday, including Manny Machado, Zach Britton and Brad Brach, the Orioles continued to work right up to the 4 p.m. ET non-waiver Trade Deadline, sending right-hander Kevin Gausman to the Braves and reportedly dealing second baseman Jonathan Schoop to the Brewers.

The 27-year-old Gausman owns a 4.43 ERA this year but has flashed mid-rotation upside throughout his first six seasons in the Major Leagues. Furthermore, he comes with two years of control beyond 2018, which fits what the Braves were seeking.

In exchange for Gausman and reliever Darren O'Day, who is out for the season following left hamstring surgery but is under contract for 2019, the O's acquired right-hander Evan Phillips, infielder Jean Carlos Encarnacion, catcher Brett Cumberland and left-hander Bruce Zimmerman as well as international signing bonus money from the Braves.

Tweet from @Orioles: The Orioles have acquired RHP Evan Phillips, INF Jean Carlos Encarnaci��n, C Brett Cumberland, LHP Bruce Zimmerman, and International Signing Bonus Slot Money from the Atlanta Braves in exchange for RHPs Kevin Gausman and Darren O���Day. #Birdland

Milwaukee, meanwhile, is reportedly sending right-hander Luis Ortiz, shortstop Jean Carmona and infielder Jonathan Villar to the O's for Schoop.

Tweet from @Ken_Rosenthal: Source: #Brewers get Schoop from #Orioles.

Tweet from @Feinsand: Per source, the full return for Schoop: Luis Ortiz, Jean Carmona and Jonathan Villar. #Brewers #Orioles

The Brewers, of course, already traded for third baseman Mike Moustakas and shifted Travis Shaw to second, so it's unclear how the club will align its infield with Schoop in the fold.

Dodgers reportedly acquire Brian Dozier from Twins
July 31: The Dodgers had been quiet on the trade front since they acquired Manny Machado during the All-Star break, but they swung a deal to add second baseman Brian Dozier from the Twins shortly before the non-waiver Trade Deadline on Tuesday, sources told MLB.com's Mark Feinsand.

Per Feinsand, Los Angeles is sending second baseman Logan Forsythe, Luke Raley and Devin Smeltzer to Minnesota.

Tweet from @Feinsand: Source: Twins sending Dozier to Dodgers for Forsythe, Raley and Smeltzer.

Despite being in the middle of a rocky offensive season, Dozier provides notable power for a middle infielder. The 31-year-old, who will be a free agent this offseason, averaged 29 home runs from 2013-17 and still has 16 homers with 52 RBIs this year even while carrying a slash line of .224/.305/.402 entering Tuesday.

There appeared to be a questionable market for Dozier after the Brewers, Phillies, D-backs and Red Sox all acquired infielders in the past week, but the Dodgers evidently view Dozier as an upgrade over their other options at second base. The Dodgers were connected to Dozier prior to the 2017 season, but ultimately declined the Twins' asking price and instead picked up Forsythe from the Rays.

Nats not expected to trade Harper; others still available?
July 31: While rumors have swirled about the availability of Bryce Harper, Nats general manager Mike Rizzo told MLB.com's Jamal Collier Tuesday that the superstar outfielder isn't going anywhere.

That may be the case for most of Washington's key players, based on Rizzo's comments to Chelsea Janes of the Washington Post.

"I believe in this team," Rizzo said.

Tweet from @chelsea_janes: Mike Rizzo just reached out with this message: "Bryce is not going anywhere. I believe in this team."

Video: Rizzo says Nationals will not trade Bryce Harper

Still, the Nats may continue taking offers for some of their assets before Tuesday's 4 p.m. ET non-waiver Trade Deadline. Besides Harper, Washington has a number of veterans on expiring contracts, including Ryan Madson, Kelvin Herrera, Shawn Kelley, Daniel Murphy and Gio Gonzalez.

Matt Harvey: Will strong run in Cincinnati convince a contender?
July 31: Harvey's final audition before the Deadline was a strong one -- five innings of two-run, two-hit, five-strikeout ball Saturday against the NL East-leading Phillies. And it was just one of a slew of solid outings for the Reds -- in six of his final seven starts before the Deadline, Harvey allowed two earned runs or fewer.

But was it enough? Will Harvey's performance sway a contender to pulling the trigger on a deal, or improve the return from a potential trade partner?

The Brewers and Cubs have been the apparent favorites to trade for Harvey, according to MLB Network insider Jon Heyman. The Cubs hold one of the worst starting ERAs in the big leagues, with pitchers Jose Quintana and Kyle Hendricks struggling this season and Yu Darvish on the shelf. 

Tweet from @JonHeyman: sources: brewers and cubs are among main teams in mix for matt Harvey. (not likely braves, I am told).

Meanwhile, according to a report from MLB Network insider Ken Rosenthal on Sunday, some teams might not be convinced, even with Harvey's stuff looking sharper of late. Per Rosenthal, "rival clubs still don't sound terribly excited about him, viewing him as No. 4-No. 5 starter."

Tweet from @Ken_Rosenthal: Take away one poor outing, and Matt Harvey���s ERA in 13 other starts with #Reds is 3.63 ERA. Velo is up, but rival clubs still don���t sound terribly excited about him, viewing him as No. 4-No. 5 starter. Averaging fewer than 7 K/9 and 5 1/3 IP per start with CIN.

On Saturday, Harvey's four-seam fastball averaged 95.2 mph and reached as high as 97.9 mph on a first-inning strikeout of Odubel Herrera -- Harvey's fastest pitch of the season. Harvey struck out three batters -- Herrera, Rhys Hoskins and Nick Williams -- on fastballs thrown 97 mph or harder. The last time he had gotten multiple swings-and-misses on 97-plus mph fastballs was Game 5 of the 2015 World Series.

Harvey remains Cincinnati's most likely player to be traded -- the 29-year-old will be a free agent this winter and can't bring the Reds any Draft-pick compensation (he's ineligible for a qualifying offer because he was an in-season acquisition from the Mets).

Milwaukee has had "ongoing" talks with the Reds about Harvey, as MLB.com's Jon Paul Morosi reported this week. Heyman reiterated Saturday that the Brewers "are in" on Harvey and would be "a great spot for him." According to USA Today's Bob Nightengale, Atlanta is determind to get a starter by Tuesday's 4 p.m. Trade Deadline, and the Braves are in the mix for Harvey.

Tweet from @BNightengale: The Atlanta #Braves have been the team most aggressive in pursuit of Cincinnati #Reds starter Matt Harvey in their trade talk

Having moved Pham, could Cards sell more pieces?
July 31: The Cardinals made a surprising deal Tuesday morning, sending outfielder Tommy Pham to the Rays for a trio of prospects. For a club that entered the day at 54-52 and only four games out of a National League postseason spot, this could indicate St. Louis is planning to sell. If so, what's next?

"I think the Cardinals are willing to shake things up right now," insider Jon Heyman said on MLB Network. "They're not happy with the way things are going. They're barely over .500 … and clearly are in a sell mode."

Video: Rays acquire Tommy Pham from Cardinals

Right-hander Bud Norris, their 33-year-old closer, is having a strong year (3.07 ERA, 1.07 WHIP, 11.3 K/9) and will be a free agent at season's end, which makes him a possible trade chip as has been rumored.

Same goes for slugger Jose Martinez, who began 2018 as the club's starting first baseman before falling out of favor under new manager Mike Shildt, in part for his limited defensive capabilities. The 30-year-old is hitting .294/.358/.459 with 13 homers and 59 RBIs and comes with club control through 2022.

One other intriguing name that might not be entirely out of the question? Marcell Ozuna, an outfielder the Cards acquired last offseason with the expectation he would solidify the middle of their lineup. The 27-year-old, however, has struggled to find consistency in his first year in St. Louis (.708 OPS). The club might not want to sell low on Ozuna; then again, it just did with Pham, who was fantastic in his breakout 2017 before slumping to .248/.331/.399 in '18.

Rays trade Ramos to Phillies
July 31: Wilson Ramos is on his way to Philadelphia. The Rays traded the catcher to the Phillies for a player to be named later Tuesday, less than an hour before the 4 p.m. ET non-waiver Trade Deadline.

In the final season of a two-year deal with Tampa Bay, Ramos has recorded a .297/.346/.488 slash line with 14 homers and 53 RBIs in 78 games. He was set to start behind the plate for the American League in this year's All-Star Game before injuring his left hamstring. Ramos, 30, is still on the disabled list, but that apparently wasn't enough to prevent the Phils from dealing for him.

The Phillies have been involved in trade discussions regarding several major names throughout July, including Manny Machado, Zach Britton, Adam Jones and Andrew McCutchen, but adding Asdrubal Cabrera from the Mets had been their biggest move.

The Phillies' current starting catcher, Jorge Alfaro, owns a .704 OPS with 104 strikeouts and just 13 walks in 275 plate appearances this season. The former top prospect may still be part of Philadelphia's future plans, but the club was evidently looking to shore up the position, at least for 2018.

As an added bonus for the Phillies, the acquisition of Ramos keeps him away from the division-rival Nationals, who had also been connected to the catcher. Ramos played for Washington from 2010-16.

Mets holding on to deGrom, Syndergaard, Wheeler?
July 31: This season hasn't been up to expectations for the Mets, but it seems they're holding out hope for 2019 -- by holding on to their three top starting pitchers.

While there has been nearly non-stop speculation all month long about the Mets' plans for Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard and Zack Wheeler amid an underwhelming market for starters, it became evident Monday afternoon that the three right-handers just might be staying put, according to Buster Olney of ESPN.

Tweet from @Buster_ESPN: Mets will keep deGrom, Syndergaard through deadline b/c they don't want to rebuild--which is also part of reason why they aren't lowering price on Wheeler. They intend to contend next year, and will need to round out their rotation, and looks like Wheeler will be part of it.

With deGrom, 30, in the middle of a career campaign -- featuring an MLB-best 1.82 ERA -- and under club control through 2020, New York had no pressure to deal him and had set an astronomical asking price.

Meanwhile, it was unlikely the Mets would sell low on the 25-year-old Syndergaard, who has been limited to 13 starts due to a strained ligament in his right index finger and, most recently, being on the DL with hand, foot and mouth disease.

Wheeler, 28, had been garnering the most interest over the past week or so, as teams have been taking notice of his improved performance and velocity increase dating back to the start of June (3.20 ERA in past 11 starts). But Andy Martino of SNY would consider it "very surprising" if Wheeler is traded today.

Tweet from @martinonyc: At this point would be very surprising if the Mets trade Zack Wheeler today.

Heyman: Realmuto trade talks 'nonexistent'
July 31: It looks as though J.T. Realmuto will be staying with the Marlins beyond Tuesday's 4 p.m. ET non-waiver Trade Deadline, as MLB Network insider Jon Heyman reports that trade discussions for the catcher are "nonexistent."

Tweet from @JonHeyman: told that, at this moment, talks regarding Realmuto are "nonexistent" #marlins

Miami, though, is still exploring additional deals after sending reliever Brad Ziegler to the D-backs and reportedly trading outfielder Cameron Maybin to the Mariners on Tuesday. Per Heyman, the Marlins are talking to teams about utility player Derek Dietrich and first baseman Justin Bour.

Tweet from @JonHeyman: marlins aren't done, and are talking to teams about dietrich and bour

While the Marlins have discussed Realmuto with the Nationals since the offseason, those talks have continually stalled as Miami's asking price has remained exorbitant.

Of course, it's no surprise that the Marlins want a huge haul for Realmuto. He's a standout at the catcher position in every phase of the game.

Realmuto is hitting .309/.359/.529 with 13 home runs and 52 RBIs in 79 games this season. He's the fastest catcher in baseball by Statcast™'s sprint speed metric. Behind the plate, he has the fastest average pop time on steal attempts of any regular catcher, as well as one of the strongest arms. Not only that, he's just 27 years old and remains under club control through 2020.

McCutchen trade considered unlikely?
July 31: Several contenders have reportedly considered trading for Andrew McCutchen, but a deal may be unlikely.

"I don't see that happening today," a Giants official told MLB Network insider Jon Heyman.

Tweet from @JonHeyman: giants official on possible McCutchen trade: "I don't see that happening today."

MLB.com's Jon Paul Morosi reported Monday that the Yankees, Indians and Phillies had all shown interest in the 31-year-old right fielder, who is hitting .253/.348/.405 with 10 homers and 43 RBIs for San Francisco this year.

Cleveland, however, might be out of the mix after addressing its outfield need by getting Leonys Martin from the Tigers on Tuesday.

McCutchen could be a good fit for the Yankees, who are currently seeking an outfield bat, ideally a righty hitter, with Aaron Judge on the disabled list. But New York's interest in the 2013 NL MVP is "soft," according to MLB.com's Mark Feinsand, who notes that the Yankees appear to be targeting other outfielders ahead of McCutchen.

Tweet from @Feinsand: Source: Yankees have "soft interest" in Giants' Andrew McCutchen. They're expected to deal for an OF today, but appear to have others in their sights ahead of the former NL MVP.

McCutchen is in the final year of a seven-year deal that's paying him $14.75 million this year, $2.5 million of which is being picked up by his former team, the Pirates. 

Padres arms could be on the move
July 31: For teams still in need of pitching, the Padres could prove to be the answer.

MLB.com's AJ Cassavell reports that contending clubs have recently checked in on starter Tyson Ross as well as relievers Kirby Yates and Craig Stammen. Ross, 31, will be a free agent after this season, but he has re-established his value as a starter after returning to San Diego in the offseason. In 21 starts this year, he is 6-8 with a 4.41 ERA, a 1.32 WHIP and an 8.0 K/9 rate.

Yates and Stammen are both under team control beyond this season, however. Yates, 31, is under contract through 2020, while the 34-year-old Stammen won't reach free agency until after 2019. Both have been excellent out of the Padres' bullpen this year, with Yates posting a 1.60 ERA and a 0.89 WHIP while Stammen holds a 2.63 ERA and a 1.11 WHIP. Accordingly, San Diego seems likely to move at least one arm prior to the Deadline.

Could Grandy return to the Bronx?
July 30: The Yankees took further steps to bolster their rotation Monday by adding Lance Lynn, and could now turn to the outfield as their chief priority before the Deadline. MLB.com's Jon Morosi reports the Bronx Bombers' targets could include an old friend: Granderson.

Tweet from @jonmorosi: Source: #Yankees, #Phillies have shown interest in #BlueJays OF Curtis Granderson. @MLB @MLBNetwork

Granderson enjoyed a fruitful four-year run in the Bronx from 2010-13, which included two All-Star Game selections and a fourth-place finish in AL MVP voting in '11 when he paced the Junior Circuit with 119 RBIs. Granderson could give New York some outfield depth as the club awaits Aaron Judge's return from the disabled list, and he still remains a viable bat against right-handed pitching.

The Phillies have checked in on outfielders Joey Gallo and Adam Jones, and so Morosi's report reaffirms their search for outfield depth.

White Sox acquire lefty Schryver from Rays

MLB.com

CHICAGO -- The Chicago White Sox have acquired left-handed pitcher Hunter Schryver from the Tampa Bay Rays in exchange for international signing bonus pool money.

Schryver, 23, is a combined 1-3 with a 2.40 ERA (13 ER/48.2 IP), nine saves, 59 strikeouts, a 1.07 WHIP and .212 opponents average (38-179) in 31 appearances (one start) this season between Class A Bowling Green and Class A Charlotte. He started the season with Bowling Green, where he posted a 2.23 ERA (9 ER/36.1 IP) and .188 (25-133) opponents average in 21 appearances before being promoted.

CHICAGO -- The Chicago White Sox have acquired left-handed pitcher Hunter Schryver from the Tampa Bay Rays in exchange for international signing bonus pool money.

Schryver, 23, is a combined 1-3 with a 2.40 ERA (13 ER/48.2 IP), nine saves, 59 strikeouts, a 1.07 WHIP and .212 opponents average (38-179) in 31 appearances (one start) this season between Class A Bowling Green and Class A Charlotte. He started the season with Bowling Green, where he posted a 2.23 ERA (9 ER/36.1 IP) and .188 (25-133) opponents average in 21 appearances before being promoted.

A 6-foot-1, 195-pound native of Harrisburg, Pa., Schryver recorded a 2.92 ERA (4 ER/12.1 IP) in 10 games with Charlotte. His last five appearances with the Stone Crabs were scoreless IP (5.2 IP).

Schryver originally was selected by Tampa Bay in the seventh round of the June 2017 First-Year Player Draft out of Villanova University. He is 5-3 with a 2.70 ERA (25 ER/83.1 IP), 15 saves and 97 strikeouts (10.5 per 9.0 IP) in 51 career games (one start) in the Rays organization. Schryver will be assigned to Class A Winston-Salem.

Chicago White Sox