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Longest stretches between WS appearances

MLB.com

For as much pageantry and pride there is for fans who watch their teams win the pennant, utlimately all but two fanbases end each season shorter than they would've hoped. Some clubs are seemingly World Series regulars, while others -- for a variety of reasons -- have had lengthy stretches between appearances in the Fall Classsic. 

Here's a quick look at the few fanbases that have had to wait the longest to see their club make it back to the game's biggest stage.

For as much pageantry and pride there is for fans who watch their teams win the pennant, utlimately all but two fanbases end each season shorter than they would've hoped. Some clubs are seemingly World Series regulars, while others -- for a variety of reasons -- have had lengthy stretches between appearances in the Fall Classsic. 

Here's a quick look at the few fanbases that have had to wait the longest to see their club make it back to the game's biggest stage.

1. Cubs: 71 years (1945-2016)
Billy goats, black cats, Gatorade gloves and Steve Bartman. North Siders had no shortage of reasons to believe their team was cursed throughout the majority of the 20th century, which saw the Cubs last win it all in 1908. Chicago made it back to the Series, and lost, seven more times between then and '45, when they fell to the Tigers in a seven-game series that spawned that famous Curse of the Billy Goat. Then the drought really began, as the Cubs notably blew commanding leads in both the '84 and 2003 National League Championship Series before the tides finally turned with stars Jon Lester, Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo -- and an almighty Game 7 rain delay -- in 2016.

Video: WS2016 Gm7: Cubs win World Series with Game 7 win

2. White Sox: 46 years (1959-2005) and 40 years (1919-59)
Many South Siders believed their own team suffered from a curse -- that of the scandalous Black Sox in 1919 -- though there was plenty of bad baseball mixed in, too. The White Sox finished as high as second place just once between '20 and '56, before Hall of Fame manager Al Lopez began turning the 'Go Go Sox' into form.

Fellow Hall of Famers Nellie Fox, Luis Aparicio, Early Wynn and Billy Pierce captured the AL pennant for Chicago in 1959, but could not defeat the Dodgers in the World Series. The White Sox suffered through three more postseason exits before finally ending their 88-year championship drought with a commanding performance in Oct. 2005, when they lost just one game over three series.

Video: 2005 WS Gm4: Chicago White Sox are World Champions

3 (tie). Athletics: 41 years (1931-72)
Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack famously built two separate dynasties in Philadelphia, and then sold many of each dynasty's star players in the years following. After losing their third straight World Series appearance to the Cardinals in seven games in 1931, the A's fell to last place within a span of four years and largely stayed in the second division through the next several decades.

A move to Kansas City in 1955 did little to change the fortunes of the A's, who were largely viewed as a quasi-farm team for the mighty Yankees throughout the decade. But eccentric owner Charlie Finley bought the club in '60 and, slowly, turned the club around. The A's drafted Reggie Jackson with the second overall pick in '66, moved west to Oakland in '68 and became the second franchise to win three straight World Series by the end of '74.

Video: 1972 WS Gm7: A's win World Series

3 (tie). Indians: 41 years (1954-95)
Behind the likes of shortstop Lou Boudreau, outfielder Larry Doby, and pitchers Bob Lemon and Bob Feller, the 1948 Indians soared to 97 wins and a championship. The club remained a force in the years to come, finishing in the top two in the AL six more times form '49-'56, including 111 victories and a pennant in '54 -- when the New York Giants swept the Tribe in the World Series. But there rough times in Cleveland after that. Between 1960-93, the Indians finished higher than fourth just once (third in '68). Finally, the franchise struck gold again in the mid-90s behind a terrific core of position players, including Albert Belle, Manny Ramirez, Jim Thome and Omar Vizquel. After coming in second in the new AL Central division in the 1994 strike year, Cleveland stormed to 100 wins in '95 before eventually falling to the Braves in the Fall Classic.

5. Braves: 34 years (1914-48)
The Braves' drought came two cities ago. Before Atlanta, and before Milwaukee, the Braves began in Boston, where they finished off a sweep of the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1914 World Series. But the Braves went into a funk after that, back when only the winner of the eight-team National League advanced the Fall Classic. After placing second and third in 1915 and '16, the franchise didn't place better than fourth again until '47. The '48 club then won 91 games to beat out the Cardinals for the NL pennant, behind a starting rotation led by the famous duo of Warren Spahn and Johnny Sain. However, the Braves fell to the Indians in the World Series, and five years later departed for Milwaukee.

These teams have never won the World Series

MLB.com

When it comes to the Major Leagues, there are still seven teams that have never won the World Series. Granted, of the four major sports leagues in North America, baseball fans are suffering the least -- the NBA (13), NFL (12) and NHL (11) all have more championship-less franchises than MLB's seven. 

Here are the clubs for which fans still wait, in order of how long they've been in their current city:

When it comes to the Major Leagues, there are still seven teams that have never won the World Series. Granted, of the four major sports leagues in North America, baseball fans are suffering the least -- the NBA (13), NFL (12) and NHL (11) all have more championship-less franchises than MLB's seven. 

Here are the clubs for which fans still wait, in order of how long they've been in their current city:

Nationals (2005)
The Nats began in the big leagues as the Montreal Expos and moved to Washington before the 2005 season. And since then, they've already had plenty of postseason heartbreak, including their Game 5 National League Division Series defeats to the Cardinals in 2012 and the Cubs in '17, as well as first-round exits in '14 anad '16. The Expos, who were founded in 1969, never won a title in Montreal, either. 

Video: Hughes calls Davis' K to end Game 5, win NLDS

Rays (1998)
The Rays don't have a lengthy history like some of the other clubs on this list, though they did win the American League pennant in 2008 before bowing out to the Phillies in a five-game World Series. That marked their first of four postseason appearances in a six-year stretch under former manager Joe Maddon. Tampa Bay has always been unconventional and unorthodox as a mid-market club lacking some of the resources that the heavyweights benefit from, and it quietly put together a 90-win season in '18 that indicates there might be more to come. 

Video: Price gets Lowrie to ground out to end the ALCS

Rockies (1993)
The Rockies clinched consecutive postseason berths for the first time in franchise history in 2017 and '18, but they didn't win a single playoff game in either run. In fact, over their three playoff appearances (they also reached in '09 as the NL Wild Card) since reaching the World Series in the well-revered "Rocktober" of '07, Colorado has only one won postseason contest since its NL-pennant clinching win against Arizona; the Rox were swept by the Red Sox in that year's World Series. The Rockies have never won the NL West, though they did force a Game 163 against the Dodgers in '18 for the right to win what would've been their first division title. 

Video: 2007 NLCS Gm4: Rockies win the NLCS vs. the D-backs

Mariners (1977)
The Mariners have not only never appeared in a World Series, but they are riding the longest playoff drought in any of the four major pro sports at 17 years. Seattle has had some of the game's biggest superstars through the years -- Ken Griffey Jr., Alex Rodriguez, Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki and many more -- but it has also had some of the postseason's biggest disappointments, most notably in 2001, when the Mariners set an MLB record with 116 wins (a feat some suggest may never been matched), yet lost to the Yankees in the ALCS in just five games. 

Video: 2001ALDS Gm5: Mariners take Game 5, move on to ALCS

Rangers (1972)
Rangers fans have had some of the most agony lately among clubs on this list, particularly given that thieir five postseason appearances since 2010 have failed to produce a title. Prior, they had made the postseason only three times -- including their time as the Washington Senators, who were founded in 1961. Texas was twice a strike away from winning the title in Game 6 of the '11 World Series against St. Louis, and the Rangers lost in five games to a Giants team that simply got hot at the right time in 2010. They also lost the 2012 AL Wild Card Game at home to the Orioles and were knocked out of the ALDS by the Blue Jays in '15 and '16. 

Video: ALCS Gm 6: Feliz gets A-Rod to secure the AL pennant

Brewers (1970)
The Brew Crew has made it to only one World Series -- a memorable seven-game loss to the Cardinals in 1982 with the "Harvey's Wallbangers" team -- and that was when they were in the AL. They nearly made it back in 2018, taking the Dodgers all the way to Game 7 of the NL Championship Series. 

• Longest stretches between WS appearances

Video: 1982 ALCS Gm5: Brewers advance to World Series

Padres (1969)
The Friars have reached the World Series twice, but both times they ran up against buzzsaws. The first was a dominant Tigers team that beat Tony Gwynn and Steve Garvey's Padres, 4-1, in the 1984 World Series, and the second was a sweep at the hands of the incredible '98 Yankees, who won 114 games in the regular season and are considered among a handful of teams as the greatest of all-time. 

Video: 1984 NLCS Gm5: Padres win the NL pennant

Daniel Kramer is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Follow him on Twitter at @DKramer_.

Best catches in postseason history

MLB.com

Perhaps some of the most memorable plays in October are made in the outfield. The range, speed and agility lead to some of the most exciting moments -- many of which are game- and season-saving. 

There has been a long line of players to make incredible, memorable catches in the postseason. Here are 18 of the best catches in MLB playoff history. 

Perhaps some of the most memorable plays in October are made in the outfield. The range, speed and agility lead to some of the most exciting moments -- many of which are game- and season-saving. 

There has been a long line of players to make incredible, memorable catches in the postseason. Here are 18 of the best catches in MLB playoff history. 

Chris Taylor, Dodgers: National League Championship Series Game 7
With elimination on the line, Taylor made what could've been a game-changing catch in robbing Christian Yelich of what would've assuredly been a run-scoring extra-base hit during the fifth inning. Shaded to the far left, Taylor sprinted into the gap and made a leaping catch over his head and shoulders while avoiding a collision with Cody Bellinger at the warning track. The snag ended the inning and helped preserve the Dodgers' lead in their eventual 5-1 win. 

Video: Must C Catch: Taylor ranges to make run-saving grab

Andrew Benintendi, Red Sox: American League Championship Series Game 4 
Benintendi's catch would have been amazing no matter what the circumstances. He had a catch probability of just 21 percent on the play, according to Statcast™ -- a 5-star catch, the most difficult grade a play can have. But the situation took it to a whole different level: the postseason stage ... the game situation -- ninth inning, two outs, bases loaded, an AL MVP Award candidate in Alex Bregman at the plate, and Boston clinging to a two-run lead ... plus the all-or-nothing nature of the play -- if Benintendi dove and missed, three runs would have scored and the Red Sox would have lost.

Video: ALCS Gm4: Statcast™ measures Benny's game-ending catch

Cody Bellinger, Dodgers: 2018 NLCS Game 4
Just a day before Benintendi's catch, in the NLCS, Bellinger made a diving 5-star catch of his own during the Dodgers' 13-inning Game 4 win over the Brewers. With the game tied in the 10th, Bellinger robbed Lorenzo Cain in right-center field on a play that had a catch probability of just 17 percent. Bellinger finished the play with a swan-dive slide across the outfield grass.

Video: NLCS Gm4: Bellinger dives, makes low-probability grab

Aaron Judge, Yankees: 2017 ALCS Game 7
Judge doesn't just crush homers, he robs them, too. In the winner-take-all Game 7 of the 2017 ALCS, Judge took away a home run from the Astros' Yuli Gurriel at Minute Maid Park to keep the game scoreless in the second inning. Judge raced back to the right-field wall and got there just in time to leap above the fence and snag Gurriel's drive before it reached the seats.

Video: Must C Catch: Judge makes leaping catch at the wall

Byron Buxton, Twins: 2017 AL Wild Card Game
Buxton might be the best defensive outfielder in baseball, and in his first career postseason game he added another catch to his highlight reel. He gave up his body to make an unbelievable jumping catch to rob Todd Frazier while crashing into the center-field wall at Yankee Stadium. But he paid the price -- Buxton had to leave the game with a back injury.

Video: AL WC: Buxton exits the game after making grab

Curtis Granderson, Mets: 2016 NL Wild Card Game
The Mets have made some amazing catches in their postseason history. The most recent was Granderson's in center field in the 2016 NL Wild Card Game at Citi Field, when he went crashing into the wall after a long run to rob the Giants' Brandon Belt. Granderson's catch, with two outs in the sixth inning of a scoreless game, kept the go-ahead run off the board while Noah Syndergaard and Madison Bumgarner engaged in a pitchers' duel. He had a catch probability of just three percent, covering 102 feet in 5.5 seconds before going headlong into the wall.

Video: NL WC: Granderson covers 102 ft. for catch in center

Endy Chavez, Mets: 2006 NLCS Game 7
One of the great catches in postseason history was consigned to irrelevance thanks to Yadier Molina and Adam Wainwright's late-game heroics. But at the moment Chavez made his catch, it seemed there was no way the Mets could lose. With the winner-take-all Game 7 of the 2006 NLCS tied 1-1 in the sixth inning, Scott Rolen crushed what should have been a tiebreaking two-run homer to deep left at Shea Stadium. Chavez raced back to the wall and went high over the fence to bring the home run back with a snowcone grab at the very apex of his leap. To top it all off, he fired a throw back to the infield and the Mets doubled off Jim Edmonds at first.

Video: NLCS Gm 7: Chavez makes a spectacular catch

Jim Edmonds, Cardinals: 2004 NLCS Game 7
Edmonds won eight Gold Gloves in center field, and it was because of plays like this. With the Astros leading Game 7, 1-0, Brad Ausmus drove a ball deep into left-center field that could have brought home two more. But Edmonds, at full sprint away from home plate, laid out for a full-extension catch that defied belief. The Cardinals went on to win the game and the pennant.

Video: 2004 NLCS Gm7: Edmonds' incredible run-saving catch

Paul O'Neill, Yankees: 1996 World Series Game 5
O'Neill helped kick off the late-1990s Yankees dynasty with a tough running catch in deep center field to end Game 5 of the '96 World Series against the Braves. With the tying and go-ahead runs on base in the ninth inning, O'Neill chased down Luis Polonia's long fly ball and snagged it with his arm fully outstretched, sealing a pivotal 1-0 win for the Bronx Bombers, as it gave them a 3-2 series lead. The Yanks would clinch the Fall Classic the next game and go on to win four World Series in the next five years.

Video: 1996 WS Gm5: Paul O'Neill makes a game-saving catch

Devon White, Blue Jays: 1992 World Series Game 3
This catch drew comparisons to Willie Mays' iconic play in the 1954 World Series. With two Braves runners on base in the fourth inning of a scoreless game, White sprinted straight back into deep center field and jumped into the SkyDome wall to rob the David Justice of an extra-base hit with a brilliant catch. The Blue Jays even turned it into a double play -- and nearly a triple play, but umpire Bob Davidson ruled Kelly Gruber had missed the tag on Deion Sanders.

Kirby Puckett, Twins: 1991 World Series Game 6
The Twins' 1991 World Series win was a classic full of memorable moments, and Puckett was responsible for two of them in Game 6. Eight innings before his walk-off home run in the 11th forced a Game 7, Puckett went airborne high over the wall to make a superhuman catch against the Plexiglas in left-center field at the Metrodome, robbing Ron Gant of extra bases.

Video: ATL@MIN: Gordon calls Puckett's leaping catch

Willie McGee, Cardinals: 1982 World Series Game 3
As a rookie, McGee helped put the capper on St. Louis' World Series Game 3 win with a terrific home run-robbing catch in center field in the ninth inning. If Gorman Thomas' drive had cleared the wall, the Cardinals' lead would have been cut to two. McGee had also made another great catch earlier in the game, and he'd driven the offense with two home runs -- at the time becoming just the third rookie to homer twice in a World Series game.

Video: 1982 WS Gm3: McGee makes amazing catch to rob a homer

Dwight Evans, Red Sox: 1975 World Series Game 6
Carlton Fisk's iconic walk-off home run played such an integral part in propelling baseball forward from a televised standpoint, yet it might not have manifested if it weren't for Dwight Evans' miraculous catch in deep right field the inning prior. In the 11th, with Ken Griffey Sr. on first, Joe Morgan jacked one to deep right that Evans snagged on the run. The eight-time Gold Glove Award winner then flung the ball for the double play to end the inning, and Fisk, of course, sent Fenway Park into a frenzy in the 12th. Evans won eight Gold Glove Awards for many amazing catches over his 20-year career, but he's best remembered for his heroics that night.

Video: WS Gm6: Evans makes spectacular catch in right field

Joe Rudi, A's: 1972 World Series Game 2
In one of the most closely contested World Series ever -- only one of the seven games was decided by more than one run in the A's championship run -- Rudi's rob of Denis Menke in Game 2 stands out. With a runner on first in the bottom of the ninth, Menke connected on a middle-middle fastball that looked destined to reach the bleachers, but Rudi utilized every fiber of his 6-foot-2 frame to make a leaping catch at the wall that, had he missed, would've assuredly tied the game. It's worth noting that the wall at Cincinnati's Riverfront Stadium stood roughly 15 feet high, meaning that had the ball ricocheted, it would've traveled well back into the outfield. And Rudi made the catch while being blinded by the sun, as the World Series was still played primarily during the day and only began playing night games the season prior.

Ron Swoboda, Mets: 1969 World Series Game 4
Tommie Agee, Mets: 1969 World Series Game 3

The 1969 Miracle Mets' World Series run had many memorable moments, but from a defensive lens, three stand out the most. In Game 4 of their five-game series win against the heavily-favored Orioles, Ron Swoboda forever linked himself with his childhood hero, Brooks Robinson, when he robbed the Hall of Famer of a would-be go-ahead hit for extra bases in the top of the ninth, sliding inward in the right-center gap against the sun to prevent two runs from scoring. Robinson did drive in a runner on third on a sacrifice to send the game to extras -- where the Mets won on an error on an attempted sacrifice bunt -- but had Swoboda come up short, the series would've likely been tied at two games apiece.

Video: '69 WS, Gm 4 BAL@NYM: Swoboda's catch preserves tie

In Game 3 -- the Mets' first at home in a World Series in club history -- the score may not have indicated a nail-biter, but Agee made two critical catches that directly saved five runs in the Mets' 5-0 win. Shaded well into right-center against pull-heavy Elrod Hendricks, Agee raced across the Shea Stadium outfield into left and made a back-handed, snowcobed grab on Hendricks' line while running into the wall. Then in the seventh, with the bases loaded with two outs for Paul Blair, Agee again made an incredible catch in the gap; this time running to his right while diving in front of the warning track and batting the wind. For good measure, Agee also hit a leadoff run homer that day.

Bobby Richardson, Yankees: 1962 World Series Game 7
The Giants may have moved to San Francisco by 1962, but their once crosstown rivalry with the Yankees remained when they met in the '62 World Series. In the first Fall Classic featured by the Bay, the Giants were on the cusp of a ninth-inning comeback in Game 7 with runners on second and third in a 1-0 game with two outs. But Willie McCovey's offensive struggles that series reached a pinnacle when he hit a bullet to second baseman Bobby Richardson to end the game.

Video: 1962 WS Gm7: Richardson robs McCovey, Yanks win

Sandy Amoros, Dodgers: 1955 World Series Game 7
The Dodgers' first World Series title may not have manifested if it weren't for their shrewd defense against the slugging Yankees, who were shut out for just the sixth time that season in Brooklyn's 2-0 win. The Yanks were threatening in the sixth with one out and runners on first and second when Yogi Berra popped one down the left-field foul line, but an athletic snag by Amoros and a cross-field throw doubled up Gil McDougald to halt any rally.

Video: WS1955 Gm7: Amoros makes catch, doubles runner off

Willie Mays, Giants: 1954 World Series Game 1
Mays' legendary grab is probably the most iconic in baseball history. Mays made what is still widely referred to as The Catch (it even has its own Wikipedia page). In a 2-2 game with the bases loaded in the top of the eighth, Mays raced back through the Polo Grounds' quirky yet cavernous outfield to make an over-the-shoulder snag that was one of the hallmark moments in their 1954 World Series sweep over the Indians.

Video: '54 WS, Gm 1: Mays' over-the-shoulder catch

Al Gionfriddo, Dodgers: 1947 World Series Game 6
Gionfriddo, a reserve outfielder for the Dodgers, entered as a defensive replacement in the sixth with Brooklyn holding an 8-5 lead over the Yankees in Game 6. The Yankees put two men on with two out and Joe DiMaggio came up as the tying run. Joltin' Joe smashed a deep fly ball to left-center that seemed sure to send the crowd of 74,000 at Yankee Stadium into a frenzy, but Gionfriddo tracked it down against the bullpen's chain-link fence to help preserve a Dodgers victory. The Yanks ultimately prevailed with a 5-2 win in Game 7.

Video: 1947 WS Gm6: Al Gionfriddo robs Joe DiMaggio of homer

13 in-season trades that were vital to World Series trips

MLB.com

Each summer, contenders around the Major Leagues scramble to add players prior to the non-waiver Trade Deadline with hopes of bolstering their rosters for a run at October. 

The Dodgers, for example, did just that when acquiring superstar shortstop Manny Machado from the Orioles, and Machado has had a huge impact on Los Angeles' run to its second consecutive National League pennant. 

Each summer, contenders around the Major Leagues scramble to add players prior to the non-waiver Trade Deadline with hopes of bolstering their rosters for a run at October. 

The Dodgers, for example, did just that when acquiring superstar shortstop Manny Machado from the Orioles, and Machado has had a huge impact on Los Angeles' run to its second consecutive National League pennant. 

For teams that missed out on those opportunities, another such deadline presents itself on Aug. 31 -- the last date that a team can add players who will be eligible for postseason rosters (see Andrew McCutchen and Josh Donaldson this year).

For all the hype that surrounds these in-season trades, how many of them have actually helped teams play deep into October and reach baseball's biggest showcase? 

We combed through decades' worth of deals to pick out 13 players who made a difference en route to the World Series.

Justin Verlander, 2017 Astros
The Astros made a stunning move, trading three prospects to the Tigers for the former AL MVP Award and Cy Young Award winner, adding Verlander in the final minutes -- seconds, actually -- before the Aug. 31 deadline.

"I think he'll add a dimension we don't have," Astros owner Jim Crane said at the time. "He's pitched well his whole career and has been pitching well lately. I think he'll add a dimension in the playoffs, hopefully, when we get there. I think it's great for the team. I think the players will be excited and fans will be excited."

Verlander earned ALCS MVP Award honors and finished 5-0 with a 1.06 ERA in five September starts before posting a 4-1 record and 2.21 ERA in six October outings to help the Astros to their first World Series title.

Video: Esurance Best Postseason Major Leaguer Winner: Miller

Andrew Miller, 2016 Indians
When the Yankees decided to become sellers before the 2016 non-waiver Trade Deadline, the Indians seized the opportunity to deal for Miller, sending four Minor League prospects to New York.

Miller bolstered an already solid bullpen, giving manager Terry Francona a plethora of weapons to use in a variety of ways.

"We're getting one of the very elite relievers in all of baseball," Francona said.

Miller proved to be just that, pitching to a 1.55 ERA in 26 regular-season appearances. The left-hander recorded at least four outs in each of his 10 postseason appearances, earning ALCS MVP Award honors against the Blue Jays, as the Indians reached their first World Series since 1997 before losing in seven games against the Cubs.

Video: NLCS Gm3: Cespedes collects three hits, two RBIs

Yoenis Cespedes, 2015 Mets
The Red Sox acquired Cespedes in a 2014 non-waiver Trade Deadline deal that sent Jon Lester to the Athletics, but the Cuban slugger would be traded again that winter to the Tigers. Only seven months after joining Detroit, Cespedes was traded to the Mets on July 31.

"His presence in the lineup and on the team will raise the energy level, and I hope it raises the energy level in the dugout and in the stands," Mets GM Sandy Alderson said after making the deal. "This is a player that can have a big impact, both in terms of on the field and how the team is perceived."

Cespedes mashed opposing pitchers after arriving in New York, blasting 17 home runs with 44 RBIs and a .942 OPS in 57 games through the end of the season. He homered twice in the NL Division Series against the Dodgers, then drove in three runs in the four-game NLCS sweep of the Cubs. The Mets lost a five-game World Series against the Royals, but Cespedes re-signed with New York after the season, making the NL All-Star team in 2016.

Video: WS2015 Gm4: Zobrist ties postseason doubles record

Ben Zobrist, 2015 Royals
The Royals were aggressive at the 2015 non-waiver Trade Deadline after reaching the World Series the previous season, acquiring Ben Zobrist from the Athletics for Sean Manaea and Aaron Brooks -- two days after trading three Minor Leaguers to the Reds for Johnny Cueto.

"Obviously, they have played well and they already have a great club, and then they have the addition of Johnny Cueto," Zobrist said after his deal. "There should be a lot more wins coming. I'm super excited about this. They are already a good team. I just have to try and not screw it up."

Zobrist hit .303 with two homers, six RBIs and an .880 OPS in 16 postseason games as the Royals won their first World Series title in 30 years. Cueto made four starts in October, pitching a pair of gems, including a complete-game victory in Game 2 of the World Series against the Mets.

Video: SF@WSH Gm1: Peavy blanks Nats over 5 2/3 to earn win

Jake Peavy, 2013 Red Sox, '14 Giants
The Red Sox acquired the veteran Peavy in a three-team deal on the day before the non-waiver Trade Deadline in 2013.

"He's an intense competitor," Boston GM Ben Cherington said. "I think he'll fit in nicely with the group that we have."

Peavy went 4-1 despite a 4.04 ERA in 10 regular-season starts, then started one game in each postseason series as the Red Sox won their third World Series since 2004.

The following summer, the Red Sox dealt the right-hander to the Giants five days before the Trade Deadline. Peavy thrived in San Francisco, going 6-4 with a 2.17 ERA in 12 starts before winning his San Francisco postseason debut with 5 2/3 scoreless innings against the Nationals. He didn't pitch particularly well in his other three postseason starts, but Peavy picked up his second straight World Series ring nonetheless.

Video: WS 2009 Gm1: Lee dominates the Yankees

Cliff Lee, 2009 Phillies and '10 Rangers
With an eye toward defending their World Series crown, the Phillies made the biggest move possible, trading for the reigning AL Cy Young Award winner two days before the non-waiver Trade Deadline.

"Obviously the Phillies are the defending world champions, they're a good team, and they're in first place," Lee said. "Honestly, it's an honor, and I look at it as a good thing. If other teams are wanting me and are willing to trade some of their key players and future players for me, it's a compliment."

The Phillies acquired Lee and Ben Francisco from the Indians, sending four Minor Leaguers back to Cleveland, including Carlos Carrasco. Lee went 7-4 with a 3.39 ERA in 12 starts following the trade, then pitched brilliantly during the postseason, going 4-0 with a 1.56 ERA in five starts. The Phillies won all five games started by Lee in the playoffs, including two against the Yankees in the World Series, but Philadelphia lost the Fall Classic in six games.

Lee was traded to the Mariners that winter, then again the following July, as the Rangers bolstered their postseason hopes. Lee pitched to a 0.75 ERA in three starts over the first two rounds of the playoffs, helping the Rangers get to their first World Series in franchise history before losing to the Giants.

Video: WS2004 Gm2: Cabrera's two-run single off the Monster

Orlando Cabrera, 2004 Red Sox
A four-team trade shook the baseball world at the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline in 2004. The Red Sox traded the face of the franchise -- Nomar Garciaparra -- to the Cubs, receiving Cabrera from the Expos and Doug Mientkiewicz from the Twins.

"We lost a great player in Nomar Garciaparra, but we've made our club more functional," Boston GM Theo Epstein said after making the deal. "We weren't going to win a World Series with our defense."

Cabrera had two solid months after replacing Garciaparra, hitting .294 with six home runs and 31 RBIs in 58 games while playing a stellar shortstop. Cabrera struggled in the ALDS against the Angels, but he starred in the next round against the Yankees, hitting .379 and playing a major role in Boston's unprecedented comeback from an 0-3 deficit.

Cabrera was one of five players to drive in three or more runs in Boston's Fall Classic sweep of St. Louis. The last out was caught by Mientkiewicz, making him part of Red Sox lore forever.

Video: COL@STL: Walker on time with Cards, getting ring

Larry Walker, 2004 Cardinals
The Cardinals already had the best record in the NL when the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline passed, but St. Louis strengthened its lineup a week later by trading for Walker, a five-time All-Star. The 37-year-old Walker waived his no-trade clause, eager for a chance to play in the World Series for the first time in his 16-year career.

"It's a good thing I am going to a team that is 31 games over .500," an emotional Walker said the day he joined the Cardinals. "It is tough not to be happy about that. They are going to the playoffs and have a chance to win the World Series."

Walker hit .280 with 11 home runs and 27 RBIs in 44 regular-season games, then hit .293 with six homers and 11 RBIs in 15 postseason games. However, Walker's first and only World Series appearance was short-lived, as the Red Sox swept the Redbirds, ending Boston's legendary 86-year World Series drought.

Video: Must C Classic: Boone send Yankees to World Series

Aaron Boone, 2003 Yankees
One look at Boone's statistics with the 2003 Yankees would lead you to believe his stay in the Bronx wasn't very impactful. Think again.

Acquired at the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline for Brandon Claussen, Charlie Manning and cash considerations, Boone took over at third base after the Yankees dealt Robin Ventura to the Dodgers on the same day. Boone hit .254 with six home runs and 31 RBIs in 54 games, but struggled in the ALCS against the Red Sox.

Manager Joe Torre benched Boone for Game 7, but he would later come into the game as a pinch-runner in the eighth, setting up the most famous swing of his career. His 11th-inning walk-off home run against knuckleballer Tim Wakefield clinched the pennant for New York, sending Yankee Stadium into a frenzy. The Yankees fell to the Marlins in a six-game World Series, but Boone's legacy in the Bronx was cemented forever.

"Not a week goes by that I'm not reminded of how big the New York Yankees are or how big their reach is," Boone said last winter after being introduced as the Yankees' new manager. "I've had hundreds of stories told to me, too, about where people were or what side of the ledger they were on."

Video: 2000 ALCS Gm6: Justice's clutch three-run home run

David Justice, 2000 Yankees
The Yankees had already won three World Series in a four-year span from 1996-99, but the 2000 team spent most of May and June fighting to stay atop the AL East. Enter Justice, a former NL Rookie of the Year Award winner and three-time All-Star, for whom the Yankees traded Zach Day, Ricky Ledee and Jake Westbrook to the Indians.

"I'm stunned," Justice said after being traded. "But business is business. That's the game we play. I'll go there and play hard like I do everywhere. I've never really felt comfortable there as an opposing player."

He certainly looked comfortable after slipping into his new pinstripes. Justice hit .305 with 20 home runs, 60 RBIs and a .977 OPS in 78 games for the Yankees, but his biggest impact came in October. The 34-year-old hit two homers and drove in eight runs against the Mariners to win ALCS MVP Award honors, as the Yankees went on to win their third straight World Series title.

David Cone, 1992 Blue Jays
The Mets didn't move Cone prior to the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline in the summer of 1992, sitting only four games out of first place in the National League East. But a 4-15 start to August blew their season apart, prompting New York to trade its ace -- an impending free agent -- to the Blue Jays on Aug. 27 for Jeff Kent and a player to be named later, who turned out to be Ryan Thompson.

"I'm here on a great team in a great organization in a city that's really hungry to win, and a team that has a good chance to win," Cone said at the time. "I'm very fortunate to be here."

Cone went 4-3 with a 2.55 ERA down the stretch for Toronto, which held off the Brewers and Orioles to win the AL East title. Cone pitched well in two of his four postseason starts, including a Game 2 gem in the ALCS against the Athletics. His World Series ring that season would be the first of five in his career.

Rickey Henderson, 1989 A's and '93 Blue Jays
Henderson had already long established himself as the game's best leadoff hitter by 1989, making eight American League All-Star teams in his first 10 seasons. When Oakland -- the team with which he started his career -- reacquired him from the Yankees for Greg Cadaret, Eric Plunk and Luis Polonia on June 21, 1989, Henderson added a huge presence to the top of an already ferocious lineup.

"There were rumors that I'd be traded, and then they came to me and asked if I would take a trade," Henderson said at the time. "Oakland was the only place I knew I'd like to go."

Henderson took off upon returning to the East Bay, batting .294 with 72 runs scored and 52 steals in 85 games. He went on to win American League Championship Series MVP honors, hitting .400 with two homers, five RBIs and eight steals against the Blue Jays. He then batted .474 in the Bay Bridge World Series, helping the Athletics sweep the Giants.

Henderson would be the focal point of another midseason deal four years later, as the Blue Jays acquired him on July 31, 1993. The Athletics received Steve Karsay and a player to be named later, who turned out to be Jose Herrera, from Toronto. While Henderson hit only .215 in 44 games after the trade, he played a role in the Blue Jays' second consecutive World Series title that October.

Video: One of baseball's most famous deals is Cards' best

Lou Brock, 1964 Cardinals
Brock was having an off year in 1964, batting .251 with two home runs, 14 RBIs and 10 stolen bases in 52 games when the Cubs traded him to the Cardinals (at the former June 15 deadline) with Jack Spring and Paul Toth for Ernie Broglio, Doug Clemens and Bobby Shantz.

The reaction to the deal wasn't positive from the Cardinals' side at the time, with future Hall of Famer Bob Gibson even calling it "a dumb trade."

Brock, who turned 25 three days after the trade, hit .348 with 12 home runs, 44 RBIs and 33 steals in 103 games for St. Louis, leading the Cardinals to the World Series after the club had been as many as 11 games out of first place in late August. He hit .300 with a home run and five RBIs in the seven-game Fall Classic against the Yankees, winning the first of his two World Series rings.

The left fielder went on to play 15 more seasons for the Cardinals, making six All-Star teams and putting together a Hall of Fame career in the process.

Mark Feinsand, executive reporter for MLB.com, has covered the Yankees and MLB since 2001 for the New York Daily News and MLB.com.

Rookie pitchers who started Game 7

MLB.com

When Walker Buehler took the mound for the Dodgers in Game 7 of the 2018 National League Championship Series, he became just the second rookie to start a winner-take-all Game 7 of an LCS matchup since the LCS was expanded from five to seven games in 1985.

In fact, dating back to the advent of the modern World Series in 1903, Buehler was only the 10th rookie to start a decisive Game 7 (or, in one case, a Game 8) in any playoff series, with the feat occurring, on average, approximately once a decade since the 1940s. Here's a look back at all of the rookies who were trusted with their team's championship hopes hanging in the balance.

When Walker Buehler took the mound for the Dodgers in Game 7 of the 2018 National League Championship Series, he became just the second rookie to start a winner-take-all Game 7 of an LCS matchup since the LCS was expanded from five to seven games in 1985.

In fact, dating back to the advent of the modern World Series in 1903, Buehler was only the 10th rookie to start a decisive Game 7 (or, in one case, a Game 8) in any playoff series, with the feat occurring, on average, approximately once a decade since the 1940s. Here's a look back at all of the rookies who were trusted with their team's championship hopes hanging in the balance.

Walker Buehler, Dodgers
2018 NLCS Game 7 vs. MIL
4.2 IP, 1 ER, 7 K, 0 BB

Buehler did his part to help the Dodgers reach the World Series for a second straight season. The 24-year-old fireballer kept the Brewers in check into the fifth inning, with the only run he allowed coming on a home run by Milwaukee star Christian Yelich. Buehler didn't qualify for the win, but he left with his team ahead, 2-1, and the Los Angeles bullpen took care of the rest. Buehler's seven strikeouts are tied for the most by a rookie in a winner-take-all Game 7, equaling the mark set by the Indians' Jaret Wright in Game 7 of the 1997 World Series. He's also just the sixth rookie pitcher to have a postseason start with seven-plus strikeouts and no walks.

Daisuke Matsuzaka, Red Sox
2007 ALCS Game 7 vs. CLE
5.0 IP, 2 ER, 3 K, 0 BB, W

The pressure was on for Matsuzaka from the moment he inked his six-year, $52 million contract as a 26-year-old rookie prior to the 2007 season -- and it came to a head when then-Red Sox manager Terry Francona handed the Japanese phenom the ball for Game 7 of the American League Championship Series after the right-hander had turned in a pair of shaky performances in his first two playoff starts.

Yet after allowing four runs in 4 2/3 innings in Game 3, Matsuzaka set an early tone in Game 7 by retiring the first eight Indians hitters while Manny Ramirez and the Red Sox's lineup spotted him an early lead. It wasn't the cleanest outing -- he ran into runners in scoring position in each of his last three innings -- but he ultimately held the lead, and Boston finished Cleveland and swept Colorado for its seventh World Series title.

John Lackey, Anaheim Angels
2002 World Series Game 7 vs. SF
5.0 IP, 1 ER, 4 K, 1 BB, W

Lackey wasn't even the rookie that made the biggest impression for the Angels in the 2002 postseason -- that distinction belonged to a 20-year-old Francisco Rodriguez, who was called up in mid-September due to injuries before gathering five wins in the postseason as the youngest pitcher in the AL.

But it was Lackey, a midseason callup who didn't join the rotation until the end of June, that delivered the Halos their only World Series championship in franchise history. Lackey allowed a sacrifice fly to Reggie Sanders in the second inning before his lineup gave him a 4-1 lead by the third inning. He held that lead through five frames before the dominant Angels bullpen took over and secured the first win for a rookie pitcher in a Game 7 in nearly a century.

Video: ALCS Gm3: Lackey recalls winning it all in 2002

Jaret Wright, Indians
1997 World Series Game 7 vs. FLA
6.1 IP, 1 ER, 7 K, 5 BB

Though he could have started ace and 20-game winner Charles Nagy with a championship on the line, Indians manager Mike Hargrove decided instead to hand the ball to Wright, his swaggering rookie 21-year-old, despite being on only three days' rest after his Game 4 victory, in which he'd allowed three runs in six innings. It turned out to be a good call.

Wright was wild but virtually unhittable through the first six innings, allowing a first-inning double to Edgar Renteria before holding the Marlins without another hit until the seventh, when Bobby Bonilla took him deep to trim Cleveland's lead to one run. Wright was pulled after his fifth walk of the game, and four innings later, Renteria drove in Craig Counsell for the series-winning walk-off run with Nagy on the mound.

Video: WS1997 Gm7: Wright limits Marlins to one over 6 1/3

Joe Magrane, Cardinals
1987 World Series Game 7 vs. MIN
4.1 IP, 2 ER, 4 K, 1 BB

The 22-year-old Magrane found a home in the Cardinals' rotation at the end of April 1987 and stuck, finishing third in the NL Rookie of the Year Award voting after leading St. Louis starters with a 3.54 ERA. (The 6-foot-6 lefty even stole home that year against the Dodgers, though it was erased after the game was rained out.) The rookie got the start for Game 7 after getting tagged for five runs in three innings in Game 1 and fared better the second time around, as he exited after a Greg Gagne single with a 2-1 lead in the fifth inning, but was charged with a second run when Kirby Puckett immediately doubled Gagne in. Todd Worrell allowed two late runs to the Twins, and Frank Viola went eight innings to give Minnesota its first World Series championship.

Video: #WeKnowPostseason: Magrane starts World Series Game 7

Mel Stottlemyre, Yankees
1964 World Series Game 7 vs. STL
4.0 IP, 3 ER, 2 K, 2 BB, L

Stottlemyre, a midseason callup by the Yankees in 1964, matched up against the Cardinals' Bob Gibson three times in the seven-game World Series. He got the better of the Hall of Famer in Game 2, holding the Cards to three runs in a complete-game effort. Stottlemyre took the loss in Game 5 despite only allowing one earned run in seven innings, and the rookie returned to the mound in a do-or-die Game 7. After three scoreless frames, the Cardinals got to him for three runs in the fourth that ended his night. St. Louis won that game, 7-5, and Gibson was named series MVP.

Video: Yankees honor Stottlemyre in Monument Park

Joe Black, Brooklyn Dodgers
1952 World Series Game 7 vs. NYY
5.1 IP, 3 ER, 1 K, 1 BB, L

Joe Black, a former Negro Leagues pitcher who was called up to the big leagues in 1952, won the NL Rookie of the Year Award with 15 wins, 15 saves and a 2.15 ERA for the Dodgers in the regular season. Black then started three times in seven days in the World Series against the Yankees; he hurled a complete-game victory in the series opener, then took the loss despite allowing just one run in seven innings in Game 4. Black gave up three runs in 5 1/3 frames in Game 7 as the Dodgers ceded the championship to New York.

Spec Shea, Yankees
1947 World Series Game 7 vs. BRO
1.1 IP, 2 ER, 0 K, 1 BB

The 1947 World Series featured a pair of promising young rookies in Jackie Robinson, the Brooklyn Dodger who integrated the big leagues, and Spec Shea, an All-Star in his first season with the Yankees. Robinson won MLB's Rookie of the Year Award, but it was Shea who won the title. The right-hander held the Dodgers to four runs in 15 1/3 innings (2.35 ERA) and was the winning pitcher in Games 1 and 5. He started the Game 7 clincher on two days' rest, but was pulled after 1 1/3 innings after Brooklyn tagged him for a pair of runs. Joe Page pitched five one-hit innings in relief, and the Yanks won their 11th title.

Hugh Bedient, Red Sox
1912 World Series Game 8 vs. NYG
7.0 IP, 1 ER, 2 K, 3 BB

Bedient enjoyed a stellar rookie campaign in 1912, winning 20 games and posting a 2.92 ERA through 41 games (28 starts). That carried over to the postseason, when Bedient allowed just one earned run to the New York Giants in 18 innings of work, including a complete game victory in Game 5. The Red Sox handed the ball to their star rookie hurler in the decisive Game 8, and Bedient delivered as Boston claimed its second championship. He held the Giants to one run and six hits in seven innings, and the Red Sox won in walk-off fashion in the 10th.

Babe Adams, Pirates
1909 World Series Game 7 vs. DET
9.0 IP, 0 ER, 1 K, 1 BB, W

Babe Adams broke out with a dominant turn in the Pirates' pitching staff in 1909, going 12-3 with a 1.11 ERA, prompting the Bucs to hand him the ball for three starts in the World Series against Detroit. Adams responded by pitching three complete-game victories, including a shutout in the decisive Game 7. Adams became the first rookie to start Game 7 of the World Series and held the Tigers to six hits and one walk with a strikeout.

Do-Hyoung Park is a reporter for MLB.com based in the Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter at @dohyoungpark.Chad Thornburg is a reporter for MLB.com based in Los Angeles.

Sox, Dodgers wait 102 years for Series rematch

Franchises set record for longest gap between Fall Classic meetings
MLB.com

The Red Sox. The Dodgers. Two storied franchises on opposite coasts that have long and rich histories. It's somewhat surprising that it's been 102 years since they met in a World Series -- in 1916, when the Red Sox defeated the Brooklyn Robins in five games for Boston's fourth World Series title.

That all changes on Tuesday, when the two clubs will meet in Game 1 of the 114th Fall Classic at Fenway Park in what will complete the longest gap between World Series meetings in MLB history.

The Red Sox. The Dodgers. Two storied franchises on opposite coasts that have long and rich histories. It's somewhat surprising that it's been 102 years since they met in a World Series -- in 1916, when the Red Sox defeated the Brooklyn Robins in five games for Boston's fourth World Series title.

That all changes on Tuesday, when the two clubs will meet in Game 1 of the 114th Fall Classic at Fenway Park in what will complete the longest gap between World Series meetings in MLB history.

:: World Series schedule and results ::

Here's a look at the last Red Sox-Dodgers Fall Classic, as well as the next four longest gaps between World Series rematches since the first Fall Classic in 1903:

Get Dodgers NL champs gear

Red Sox vs. Dodgers, 102 years (1916-2018)
Boston won the first two games of the 1916 World Series, with 21-year-old Babe Ruth making his postseason pitching debut in Game 2. The lefty was brilliant, pitching all 14 innings of the Red Sox's 2-1 victory, giving up one run on six hits, walking three and striking out four. At the plate, Ruth went 0-for-5. The game-winning hit came courtesy of Del Gainer, who hit a walk-off single to center field. Brooklyn won Game 3, but Boston came back to win Games 4 and 5, outscoring the Robins, 10-3.

Get Red Sox AL champs gear

A's vs. Giants, 76 years (1913-89)
The A's and Giants met in the 1989 World Series, which was dubbed the "Bay Bridge Series" after the bridge that connects Oakland and San Francisco. The two franchises squared off in the Fall Classic three other times prior to that, in '05 (Giants won in five games), '11 (Giants won in six games) and '13 (Athletics won in five games). All of those, of course, were played while the Giants were in New York and the A's in Philadelphia.

In 1989, the World Series was interrupted by a massive earthquake in the Bay Area. Twelve days after the earthquake, the Series resumed, and the A's swept the Giants, with right-hander Dave Stewart winning the World Series MVP Award.

Video: A look back at the 1989 World Series

Phillies vs. Yankees, 59 years (1950-2009)
When the Phillies and Yankees met in the 2009 World Series, it was a rematch 59 years in the making. New York swept Philadelphia in the 1950 Fall Classic, with the Phils losing four games by a combined five runs. Joe DiMaggio was the star, going 4-for-13 with a double and a go-ahead homer in the 10th inning of Game 2 at Shibe Park. Yogi Berra also homered in the Series.

The result was the same in 2009, with the Yankees winning their 27th World Series championship in six games over the Phillies. Hideki Matsui was the Series MVP, hitting .615 (8-for-15) with a double and three homers.

Video: MLB Productions recalls the 2009 World Series

Braves vs. Indians, 47 years (1948-95)
When the Indians won the American League pennant in 1995, it was the first time the Tribe had advanced to the World Series since '54. Cleveland lost that Series to the Giants, but won its last championship in '48 against the Braves. Atlanta and Cleveland met in the '95 World Series as a battle of the game's best starting rotation against the its most powerful lineup. In six games, the Braves' pitching won out, as they won their first championship in Atlanta with a 1-0 victory behind eight scoreless innings from Series MVP Tom Glavine, and a homer from David Justice.

The 1948 World Series was also decided in six games, but with the Tribe as the winner. Larry Doby hit .318 with a double and a homer, and Bob Lemon starred on the mound, posting a 1.65 ERA in a pair of Cleveland victories.

Video: Former '90's Braves on winning the 1995 World Series

Cardinals vs. Tigers, 38 years (1968-2006)
The 1968 World Series was a classic, with the Tigers emerging victorious in seven games. Mickey Lolich was the Series MVP, posting a 1.67 ERA in three starts, including a complete game in Detroit's 4-1 victory in Game 7. In 2006, it was St. Louis that won the title, beating Detroit in five games. The unlikely hero, and World Series MVP, was middle infielder David Eckstein, who hit .364 with three doubles and four RBIs. All three doubles came in Game 4, including the go-ahead hit in the bottom of the eighth inning of a 5-4 victory.

Both clubs would return to the World Series one year apart, with the Tigers losing to the Giants in 2012, and the Cardinals beating the Rangers in '11 before losing to the Red Sox in '13.

Video: MLB Productions recalls the 2006 World Series

Braves vs. Yankees, 38 years (1958-96)
A year after the Braves won the 1995 World Series, they returned in '96 to face the Yankees, who had reached the Fall Classic for the first time in 15 years. It marked the beginning of a Yanks dynasty that included four championships over a five-year span. It was also the first time the two franchises faced each other in the World Series since '58, when the Yankees won in seven games. Bob Turley tossed 6 2/3 innings out of the bullpen in Game 7 and posted a 2.76 ERA in four appearances (two starts) to earn Series MVP honors. Hank Bauer hit .323 with four homers, and Mickey Mantle hit two of his World Series-record 18 homers that October.

Thirty-eight years later, the Yankees were again victorious, this time by reeling off four straight victories after falling behind, two games to none. Closer John Wetteland was named Series MVP after picking up a save in each victory and posting a 2.08 ERA.

Video: MLB Productions looks back at the 1996 World Series

Manny Randhawa is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Follow him on Twitter at @MannyOnMLB.

Boston Red Sox, Los Angeles Dodgers

Teams that lost WS and returned the next year

MLB.com

If at first you don't succeed, try, try again.

That saying has applied to many teams throughout Major League history, when it comes to the World Series, and now the Dodgers are the latest. After the 2017 Dodgers made it all the way to Game 7 against the Astros, Los Angeles is back in the Fall Classic again to face Boston.

If at first you don't succeed, try, try again.

That saying has applied to many teams throughout Major League history, when it comes to the World Series, and now the Dodgers are the latest. After the 2017 Dodgers made it all the way to Game 7 against the Astros, Los Angeles is back in the Fall Classic again to face Boston.

World Series presented by YouTube TV, Game 1: Tuesday, 8:09 p.m. ET/5:09 PT on FOX

:: World Series schedule and results ::

Overcoming some tough challenges, the Dodgers advanced past the National League Championship Series with Saturday night's 5-1 victory over the Brewers in Game 7 at Milwaukee. Now the Dodgers' second straight appearance in MLB's showcase event begins on Tuesday night at Fenway Park. That makes the Dodgers the 28th team to lose a World Series but return the next year, including three that lost two in a row before qualifying for a third.

Of those first 27, 15 succeeded where they had failed a season earlier and claimed a championship.

The task of returning has grown significantly more difficult in recent years, however, since the beginning of the Divisional Era in 1969, when the postseason expanded to include the League Championship Series. Before the Dodgers, seven teams had made it back to the World Series following a loss in that time, including just two since the Division Series entered the picture in '95. 

Here is a look at each of those returning teams and how they fared.

Royals: 2014-15
2014: Lost to Giants in 7
2015: Beat Mets in 5
In their first postseason appearance since winning the 1985 World Series, the 2014 Royals went all the way to Game 7 of the Fall Classic. They had the tying run 90 feet away in the bottom of the ninth, but Madison Bumgarner retired Salvador Perez after Alex Gordon was held at third on the previous play. Kansas City finished the job the next year, however, rallying for two runs to tie Game 5 in the top of the ninth at Citi Field and claiming its rings with a five-run 12th.

Video: Royals beat Mets in five games to win World Series

Rangers: 2010-11
2010: Lost to Giants in 5
2011: Lost to Cardinals in 7
Texas' only two trips to the World Series came in back-to-back seasons. While the Giants outscored the Rangers, 29-12, in 2010, the next October brought a far more agonizing conclusion. Texas led the series, 3-2, and had St. Louis down to its last out in both the ninth and 10th innings before losing on David Freese's walk-off homer in the 11th. Chris Carpenter pitched the Cardinals to victory in Game 7.

Video: 1991 WS Gm7: Larkin's single wins series for Twins

Braves: 1991-92
1991: Lost to Twins in 7
1992: Lost to Blue Jays in 6
Before dominating the NL in the 1990s, the Braves hadn't made it to the World Series since '57, when they still resided in Milwaukee. The '91 Series was a classic, with Minnesota's Jack Morris famously dueling John Smoltz en route to a 10-inning, 1-0 shutout in Game 7. The next season brought another close call, as Atlanta endured four one-run losses, including an 11-inning affair in Game 6. However, the Braves got their championship three years later.

Athletics: 1988-89
1988: Lost to Dodgers in 5
1989: Beat Giants in 4
The 1988 A's won 104 games and swept the Red Sox in the ALCS. But in the World Series, the Dodgers took Game 1 on Kirk Gibson's iconic walk-off homer off of Dennis Eckersley, and they rolled from there behind two dominant complete games from Orel Hershiser. The '89 A's swept their crosstown foes, although the devastating Loma Prieta earthquake that struck the Bay Area just before Game 3 postponed the conclusion of the Series. Oakland returned for a third straight year in '90, but it was swept by Cincinnati.

Video: 1989 WS Gm4: A's complete the sweep

Dodgers: 1977-78
1977: Lost to Yankees in 6
1978: Lost to Yankees in 6
The Dodgers' old New York rival bested them two years in row, in the most recent instance of the same two clubs meeting in back-to-back Fall Classics. Reggie Jackson's three home runs in Game 6 sealed the deal in 1977. The '78 Dodgers took a 2-0 lead before dropping four straight, including a heartbreaking Game 4 loss in the Bronx in which the Yankees erased a 3-0 deficit before Lou Piniella's walk-off single in the 10th. However, the Dodgers got their revenge by beating the Yanks in the 1981 World Series.

Yankees: 1976-77
1976: Lost to Reds in 4
1977: Beat Dodgers in 6
The Yankees snapped what was, for them, an interminable drought in 1976, making the World Series for the first time since '64. Their stay didn't last long, however, as the Big Red Machine romped to a sweep in which it outscored New York, 22-8. A year later, the Yanks won 100 games for the second straight season, before Jackson's heroics helped take down the Dodgers.

Video: WS Gm6: Yankees win 1977 World Series

Orioles: 1969-70
1969: Lost to Mets in 5
1970: Beat Reds in 5
Baltimore won the World Series over the Dodgers in 1966 and made it back three years later, only to run into the "Miracle Mets." The Orioles, who went 109-53 in the regular season and swept through the ALCS, scored just nine runs over five games against New York's pitching. They had far more luck against Cincinnati in '70, scoring 33 runs and blasting 10 homers, including two apiece from Boog Powell, Frank Robinson and World Series MVP Brooks Robinson. Baltimore made the Fall Classic for a third straight year in '71, but fell to Pittsburgh in seven games.

Video: 1970 WS Gm5: Orioles win World Series

PRE-DIVISIONAL ERA

Yankees: 1963-64
1963: Lost to Dodgers in 4
1964: Lost to Cardinals in 7
St. Louis' Bob Gibson notched his second complete-game victory of the 1964 Series in Game 7, withstanding a late Yankees rally.

Video: 1964 WS Gm7: Gibson seals World Series Game 7 win

Yankees: 1960-61
1960: Lost to Pirates in 7
1961: Beat Reds in 5
Recovering from Bill Mazeroski's walk-off homer in Game 7 in 1960, the Yankees won the next two World Series, also beating the Giants in seven games in '62.

Video: #WeKnowPostseason: The 1960 World Series

Yankees: 1957-58
1957: Lost to Braves in 7
1958: Beat Braves in 7
It looked like the Braves would get the better of the Yankees for the second year in a row when they took a 3-1 lead in 1958, but New York stormed back with three straight victories.

Video: NYY@MIL: Turley gets final out for Yankees WS win

Yankees: 1955-56
1955: Lost to Dodgers in 7
1956: Beat Dodgers in 7
The Yankees tormented the Dodgers in this era, beating them in five of their six World Series matchups between 1947-56, with '55 the lone exception.

Video: Don Larsen throws perfect game in 1956 World Series

Dodgers: 1952-53
1952: Lost to Yankees in 7
1953: Lost to Yankees in 6
The Dodgers had a 3-2 lead in 1952 before losing the final two games in Brooklyn and couldn't take advantage of a rematch in '53.

Cardinals: 1943-44
1943: Lost to Yankees in 5
1944: Beat Browns in 6
The Cardinals beat the Yankees in 1942, lost the rematch in '43, but then captured another championship in '44 in an all-St. Louis World Series.

Yankees: 1942-43
1942: Lost to Cardinals in 5
1943: Beat Cardinals in 5
The Yankees allowed a total of three runs over three straight wins to finish the 1943 Series, capped by Spud Chandler's Game 5 shutout.

Reds: 1939-40
1939: Lost to Yankees in 4
1940: Beat Tigers in 7
The Reds nearly fell short again in 1940, but won Games 6 and 7 in Cincinnati behind Bucky Walters' shutout and Paul Derringer's one-run complete game, respectively.

Giants: 1936-37
1936: Lost to Yankees in 6
1937: Lost to Yankees in 5
The Giants couldn't hold down the Yankees' potent offense in either matchup, allowing roughly 6.5 runs per game over the two Series.

Tigers: 1934-35
1934: Lost to Cardinals in 7
1935: Beat Cubs in 6
After falling just short against St. Louis' "Gashouse Gang" in 1934, Detroit claimed a championship on Goose Goslin's Game 6 walk-off single a year later.

Cardinals: 1930-31
1930: Lost to Athletics in 6
1931: Beat Athletics in 7
St. Louis won a rematch in 1931 behind Pepper Martin's 12 hits and two victories apiece from Burleigh Grimes and Bill Hallahan.

Yankees: 1926-27
1926: Lost to Cardinals in 7
1927: Beat Pirates in 4
A thrilling 1926 Series ended with Babe Ruth -- representing the tying run -- getting caught stealing. But Ruth had two homers and seven RBIs to help spur a sweep in '27.

Giants: 1923-24
1923: Lost to Yankees in 6
1924: Lost to Senators in 7
The Giants won championships in both 1921-22 before losing two in a row, with the '24 Series coming down to Earl McNeely's walk-off double in the 12th inning of Game 7.

Yankees: 1921-23
1921: Lost to Giants in 8
1922: Lost to Giants in 5 (including a tie)
1923: Beat Giants in 6
These were the Yankees' first three trips to the Fall Classic, and they finally triumphed in 1923, the debut season of the original Yankee Stadium.

Giants: 1911-13
1911: Lost to Athletics in 6
1912: Lost to Red Sox in 8 (including a tie)
1913: Lost to Athletics in 5
The Giants' loss in 1912 was particularly hard fought, coming down to a winner-take-all Game 8, when they took the lead in the top of the 10th only to see Boston walk off against Christy Mathewson in the bottom of the inning.

Tigers: 1907-09
1907: Lost to Cubs in 5 (including a tie)
1908: Lost to Cubs in 5
1909: Lost to Pirates in 7
Ty Cobb's Tigers couldn't quite break through, with Pittsburgh rookie pitcher Babe Adams twirling three complete-game victories in 1909, including a Game 7 shutout.

Cubs: 1906-07
1906: Lost to White Sox in 6
1907: Beat Tigers in 5 (including a tie)
After losing an all-Chicago Series in 1906, the Cubs beat the Tigers in both of the next two years, holding Detroit to six runs in five games in '07. 

Andrew Simon is a research analyst for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @AndrewSimonMLB.

Tigers' all-time retired numbers

MLB.com

Look out beyond the vast outfield depths of Comerica Park, and history looms.

Along the brick wall separating the outfield concourse from the lower-bowl seats in left and right field, the Tigers list the names and numbers of every player whose number has been retired by the team. Many of the players also have a statue on the outfield concourse.

Look out beyond the vast outfield depths of Comerica Park, and history looms.

Along the brick wall separating the outfield concourse from the lower-bowl seats in left and right field, the Tigers list the names and numbers of every player whose number has been retired by the team. Many of the players also have a statue on the outfield concourse.

It's one of the distinguishing features of the ballpark, and a nod to the rich history the Tigers enjoy as one of the American League's founding teams. It's also not an easy honor to earn.

The retirement of a Tigers number is generally tied to a player's induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame as a Tiger. Only Willie Horton, a hometown hero in Detroit, has his number retired in Detroit without a plaque in Cooperstown.

Ty Cobb, Sam Crawford, Mickey Cochrane, Harry Heilmann, Hughie Jennings and Heinie Manush are all Hall of Famers whose names adorn Comerica Park's wall, but they do not have retired numbers. Cobb, Heilmann, Crawford, Manush and Jennings played for the Tigers in an era before numbers were commonplace, while Cochrane spent the majority of his playing days with the Philadelphia Athletics before he finished his career as a player-manager in Detroit -- which included winning the World Series in 1935. Another Hall of Famer whose name is on the wall, George Kell, wore three different numbers during his Tigers tenure. Legendary broadcaster Ernie Harwell is also commemorated on the wall without a number.

Here's a list of the select Tigers whose numbers are retired:

Charlie Gehringer, 2B: No. 2
Number retired: June 12, 1983
Nicknamed "The Mechanical Man" by longtime opponent Lefty Gomez, Gehringer played all 19 seasons of his career in Detroit with the quiet consistency ingrained in him from his upbringing on a farm in Michigan. Gehringer batted .320 during his career, garnering six consecutive All-Star selections and earning AL MVP honors and a batting title in 1937. He led the AL in hits, runs scored, doubles, triples and stolen bases in '29. Scouted by Cobb, he retired trailing only "The Georgia Peach" on the Tigers' all-time list in several offensive categories -- including hits, doubles, triples and total bases. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in '49.

Video: Tigers Retired Number: No. 2, Charlie Gehringer

Alan Trammell, SS: No. 3
Number retired: Aug. 26, 2018
One of two players to spend careers of 20 or more seasons playing solely for the Tigers, Trammell rose from a skinny two-sport high-school star in San Diego to become a cornerstone of the Tigers' teams of the 1980s. He was named World Series MVP in '84 and teamed with Lou Whitaker to form the greatest double-play duo in Major League history. A six-time All-Star, four-time Gold Glove winner and three-time Silver Slugger, Trammell was so consistent offensively and defensively he remained relatively undervalued among the great shortstops of his era. The Veterans Committee eventually elected him to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2018.

Video: Alan Trammell celebrated at Comerica Park

Hank Greenberg, 1B: No. 5
Number retired: June 12, 1983
Not only was Greenberg the power behind the great Tigers teams of the 1930s and '40s -- leading the AL in home runs four times -- he was a cultural icon, proudly honoring his Jewish heritage. He missed three-plus seasons during his prime to serve his country in World War II, yet still retired as the franchise's leader in home runs. He won AL MVP honors in '35 and '40, just before his military service, and drove in 184 runs in '37. Greenberg was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in '56.

Video: Hall of Fame Biography: Hank Greenberg

Al Kaline, OF: No. 6
Number retired: Aug. 17, 1980
Known simply as "Mr. Tiger," Kaline joined the team as an 18-year-old -- signing in 1953 -- and has served the club in some capacity ever since, including playing 22 seasons in a Tigers uniform. He became the youngest-ever batting champion when he hit .340 as a 20-year-old in 1955, besting Ty Cobb's mark by a day. Nineteen years later, Kaline joined Cobb as the second Tiger in the 3,000-hit club, retiring at end of '74 as the club's leader in home runs (399) and games played (2,834). Kaline was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility in '80.

Video: DET@BAL: Al Kaline gets his 3,000th hit

Sparky Anderson, MGR: No. 11
Number retired: June 26, 2011
The first member of the 1984 World Series champion Tigers to be honored in Cooperstown was their manager. Anderson molded a team of promising young players into winners after taking the helm in '79. He managed Detroit to 1,331 wins over 17 seasons, winning AL Manager of the Year honors in '84 and '87, before retiring after the '95 season. His teachings lived on in former players Trammell and Kirk Gibson, both of whom became managers. The Veterans Committee elected Anderson to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000, and the Tigers retired his number following his death in '10.

Video: Tigers retire Anderson's No. 11 in a pregame ceremony

Hal Newhouser, P: No. 16
Number retired: July 27, 1997
Born and raised in Detroit, Newhouser grew up following the great Tigers teams of the 1930s before becoming the centerpiece of their glory years in the '40s. A gangly, hard-throwing, highly-competitive left-hander, Newhouser won 80 games from '44-46. He also became the first pitcher to win back-to-back MVP awards. Newhouser won 200 games during his 15 seasons in Detroit and was the Tigers' franchise leader in career strikeouts at the time of his retirement in '55. He eventually became a Hall of Famer when the Veterans Committee elected him in '92.

Willie Horton, OF: No. 23
Number retired: July 15, 2000
Horton became a Detroit icon because of his work on and off the diamond. After becoming a local high-school legend following his family's move from Virginia, Horton signed with his hometown club as a teenager and became the Tigers' first African-American star at a time when riots and unrest threatened to divide Detroit. The four-time All-Star slugged 36 home runs in 1968, but was better known for throwing out Lou Brock at home plate during the World Series that October -- a critical play that helped pave the way to the Tigers' first title in 23 years. Horton played parts of 15 seasons in Detroit.

Video: WS1968 Gm5: Horton gets Brock at the plate

Jack Morris, P: No. 47
Number retired: Aug. 12, 2018
Baseball's winningest pitcher of the 1980s was the Tigers' ace during that decade, a workhorse right-hander who delivered 154 complete games and 198 wins over his 14 seasons in Detroit. He tossed a no-hitter in his second start of '84, then ended the season with two complete-game wins in the World Series. A lengthy wait for Cooperstown ended when the Veterans Committee elected Morris to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2018.

Video: MIN@DET: Tigers retire Morris' uniform No. 47

Note: On April 15, 1997, the Tigers joined every team in MLB by retiring No. 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson.

Jason Beck has covered the Tigers for MLB.com since 2002. Read Beck's Blog, follow him on Twitter @beckjason and Facebook.

Detroit Tigers

Here are the greatest LCS Game 6's of all time

MLB.com

Game 6 in a League Championship Series -- like the Brewers' 7-2 victory over the Dodgers on Friday night in Milwaukee -- always means the stage is set for a thriller. One team being so close to a pennant and a trip to the World Series, the other battling to stave off elimination and force a winner-take-all Game 7, is a recipe for must-watch October baseball.

Even though the LCS has only been played in a best-of-seven format since 1985, there have been plenty of classics in Game 6. MLB.com ranks the top 10.

Game 6 in a League Championship Series -- like the Brewers' 7-2 victory over the Dodgers on Friday night in Milwaukee -- always means the stage is set for a thriller. One team being so close to a pennant and a trip to the World Series, the other battling to stave off elimination and force a winner-take-all Game 7, is a recipe for must-watch October baseball.

Even though the LCS has only been played in a best-of-seven format since 1985, there have been plenty of classics in Game 6. MLB.com ranks the top 10.

10. 2016 NLCS: Cubs 5, Dodgers 0
Entering the 2016 postseason, not only had the Cubs not won a World Series in 108 years, they hadn't even been to the World Series in 71 years. To clinch their first National League pennant since 1945, they had to go through Clayton Kershaw. And they did in the series-clinching Game 6 of the NLCS at Wrigley Field. Kris Bryant opened the scoring with a single off Kershaw just two batters into the first, and Anthony Rizzo capped Chicago's five-run effort against the Dodgers' ace with a home run to right-center field in the fifth. All the while, Kyle Hendricks was masterful, pitching 7 1/3 brilliant innings of two-hit baseball before Aroldis Chapman closed out the series.

Video: Must C Clinch: Cubs celebrate National League crown

9. 2015 ALCS: Royals 4, Blue Jays 3
En route to their first World Series title since 1985, the Royals prevailed in a hard-fought ALCS Game 6 clincher to take the pennant against the Blue Jays. Jose Bautista's big game kept the Blue Jays in it -- he homered twice, including a game-tying shot in the eighth. But the Royals struck back in the bottom of the eighth, with Eric Hosmer lining the go-ahead single off Roberto Osuna. Wade Davis then escaped a major ninth-inning jam -- Toronto had the tying run on third and the go-ahead run on first with no outs -- getting back-to-back strikeouts of Dioner Navarro and Ben Revere and a series-ending groundout from American League MVP Award winner Josh Donaldson.

Video: Momentum shifts back and forth in 8th frame of Game 6

8. 1991 NLCS: Braves 1, Pirates 0
Steve Avery and Doug Drabek dueled in one of the best pitching matchups in postseason history on a crisp night in front of 54,508 at Three Rivers Stadium. Going punch for punch, the game remained scoreless until the ninth, when Greg Olson lined a two-out double to left that scored Ron Gant. It proved to be all Atlanta needed to force Game 7, which the Braves won as well to become the first team in NL history to go from last place one year to the World Series the next. Avery finished the night with eight strikeouts to cap a 16 1/3-inning scoreless series, for which he won the NLCS MVP Award.

Video: 91 NLCS Gm6: Olson hits go-ahead RBI double in ninth

7. 1985 NLCS: Cardinals 7, Dodgers 5
The first Game 6 in NLCS history -- this was the first year of the best-of-seven format -- was one of the best. The Cardinals held a 3-2 series lead over the Dodgers, but Los Angeles held a 5-4 lead in Game 6 with two outs in the ninth inning. With the Cardinals down to their last out and the Dodgers on the verge of forcing a winner-take-all Game 7, Jack Clark crushed a go-ahead three-run homer to deep left field off Tom Niedenfuer. The Cards advanced to the World Series.

Video: '85 NLCS, Gm 6: Clark puts Cards ahead in the ninth

6. 1999 NLCS: Braves 10, Mets 9 (11 innings)
The Mets needed a tiebreaking Game 163 just to get into the postseason, but they got their chance to supplant the NL East champion Braves in that year's NLCS. But things didn't start strong, as New York fell into a 3-0 hole before bouncing back to win Games 4 and 5. Game 6 was as back and forth as either club had seen all season. With a home crowd behind them, the Braves took a 5-0 lead in the first only to watch the Mets roar back and tie it, 7-7, in the seventh. The teams each added runs in the eighth and 10th innings before Andruw Jones drew a bases-loaded walk from Kenny Rogers in the 11th to secure the NL pennant for Atlanta.

Video: 1999 NLCS Gm6: Caray calls Braves advancing to WS

5. 1997 ALCS: Indians 1, Orioles 0 (11 innings)
The end result of a brilliant pitchers' duel at Camden Yards in Game 6 of the 1997 ALCS was the Indians clinching a World Series berth at the expense of the Orioles. Charles Nagy was spotless for the Tribe over 7 1/3 innings -- but Mike Mussina was even more masterful for the O's, allowing just one hit in eight shutout innings while striking out 10. But in the 11th inning of a scoreless game, Tony Fernandez finally came up with the big hit for the Indians -- a two-out homer to right field off Armando Benitez. Jose Mesa sealed the series in the bottom of the 11th by striking out Roberto Alomar with the tying run aboard.

Video: CLE@BAL: Indians clinch ALCS to advance to Series

4. 2004 ALCS: Red Sox 4, Yankees 2
The Bloody Sock Game. The image of the blood seeping through Curt Schilling's sock as he stood on the mound is one of the most memorable in MLB postseason history. With the Red Sox facing elimination -- and pitching through a bad ankle injury -- Schilling delivered one of the gutsiest performances in recent history. He threw seven dominant innings to beat the Yankees, allowing just one run. Boston forced a Game 7, where they completed their historic comeback after being down 3-0 to their rivals, then they swept the Cardinals in the World Series to shatter the Curse of the Bambino.

Video: 2004 ALCS Gm6: Schilling's epic performance

3. 2003 NLCS: Marlins 8, Cubs 3
Game 6 of the 2003 NLCS -- the Bartman game -- tormented Cubs fans until the team finally shattered its century-plus-long World Series championship drought in '16. Steve Bartman reaching out for Luis Castillo's eighth-inning foul ball down the left-field line at Wrigley Field and stopping Moises Alou from catching it is, of course, the most infamous moment from the game. But it only became so because of the incredible Marlins comeback that ensued. Mark Prior took a shutout into the eighth, putting the Cubs just six outs from the Fall Classic, but Florida erupted for eight runs in the inning -- all after the incident -- off Prior and the Cubs' bullpen. They won the series the next day and the World Series after that.

Video: 2003 NLCS Gm6: Marlins rally in eighth to take lead

2. 2004 NLCS: Cardinals 6, Astros 4 (12 innings)
The enduring image from this thriller: Jim Edmonds standing in the batter's box, triumphantly pumping both fists, after launching a walk-off home run to deep right-center field in the 12th inning at Busch Stadium to force a Game 7 against the Astros. Edmonds raised his arms in the air as he rounded the bases before leaping into the dogpile of his Cardinals teammates waiting for him at home plate. Edmonds' homer was the second straight walk-off in the series after Jeff Kent's three-run shot for the Astros won Game 5. The Cardinals would ride the momentum of Edmonds' blast and take the series in Game 7.

Video: NLCS Gm6: Edmonds wins it with a walk-off homer

1. 1986 NLCS: Mets 7, Astros 6 (16 innings)
The Mets' NLCS clincher at the Astrodome set the stage for one of the most memorable Fall Classics of all time against the Red Sox. But for a while, it looked like the Astros would force a Game 7. Houston carried a 3-0 lead into the ninth inning, but the Mets rallied to tie the score. The extra innings were thrilling. Wally Backman knocked a go-ahead single for the Mets in the top of the 14th, only for the Astros to tie the game in the bottom of the 14th on Billy Hatcher's homer off Jesse Orosco. The Mets scored three more times in the top of the 16th; the Astros rallied for two in the bottom of the 16th, and had the tying run in scoring position with two outs. But Orosco struck out Kevin Bass to end the game -- joyously launching his glove into the air in celebration. It was one of the many memorable moments from the '86 Mets' amazing postseason.

Every World Series rematch in MLB history

MLB.com

Every year, one team leaves the World Series a champion -- and another leaves it with a score to settle. But actually getting the chance to settle that score is rare.

In Major League Baseball history, there have been 113 World Series, but only nine instances of World Series rematches -- the same two teams meeting in the Fall Classic multiple years in a row. And there hasn't been one in 40 years.

Every year, one team leaves the World Series a champion -- and another leaves it with a score to settle. But actually getting the chance to settle that score is rare.

In Major League Baseball history, there have been 113 World Series, but only nine instances of World Series rematches -- the same two teams meeting in the Fall Classic multiple years in a row. And there hasn't been one in 40 years.

Here's a look back at every previous World Series rematch.

Yankees vs. Dodgers, 1977-78
1977: Yankees defeat Dodgers, 4-2
1978: Yankees defeat Dodgers, 4-2
The Bronx was burning in 1977, as the Yankees won their first World Series title under George Steinbrenner, who had taken ownership of the team four years earlier. The Yankees had won the AL pennant the season before, but were swept by the Big Red Machine in the World Series, and that winter they signed Reggie Jackson. In the 1977 Fall Classic, Jackson became Mr. October with his iconic performance in the clinching Game 6 of the World Series against the Dodgers, when he homered three times on total three pitches off three different Dodgers pitchers.

Video: Must C Classic: Reggie Jackson becomes Mr. October

In 1978, both the Yankees and Dodgers were back, the Yankees only getting into the playoffs after beating the Red Sox the infamous tiebreaker game to win the AL East -- the Bucky Dent Game. In the Fall Classic, the Steve Garvey and Ron Cey-led Dodgers jumped out to a 2-0 lead, with a post-surgery Tommy John winning Game 1. But the Yankees won four straight to clinch a repeat, thanks to Jackson, Ron Guidry, Goose Gossage and the World Series MVP Dent.

Yankees vs. Braves, 1957-58
1957: Braves defeat Yankees, 4-3
1958: Yankees defeat Braves, 4-3
Exactly two decades before the Yankees-Dodgers rematch, the Braves and Yankees squared off in back-to-back seven-game Fall Classics. The Braves took the first of those, the only championship the franchise won while located in Milwaukee. That year's Braves team was led by the legendary trio of Cy Young winner Warren Spahn, league MVP Hank Aaron and Eddie Mathews. But the World Series hero was actually Lew Burdette, who beat the Yankees three times, including pitching a shutout in the deciding Game 7 on the road at Yankee Stadium.

Video: 1957 WS Gm7: Braves defeat Yankees to win 1957 WS

In 1958, the Mickey Mantle, Whitey Ford and Yogi Berra-led Yankees -- suddenly the only team left in New York, with both the Dodgers and Giants moving to California that year -- got their revenge in the rematch against Milwaukee. The Braves actually led the Series, 3-1, but the Yankees rallied to win three games in a row. With Game 7 tied entering the eighth inning in Milwaukee, Berra started the Yankees' rally with a double, Elston Howard singled him home with the go-ahead run, and a few batters later Moose Skowron put the series away with a three-run homer.

Video: WS1958 Gm7: Skowron's homer gives Yankees a 6-2 lead

Yankees vs. Dodgers, 1955-56
1955: Dodgers defeat Yankees, 4-3
1956: Yankees defeat Dodgers, 4-3
These were the final World Series meetings of the Dodgers and Yankees' Brooklyn-Bronx rivalry, before the Dodgers went west in 1958. They were also the last two all-New York World Series until the Yankees-Mets Subway Series in 2000. Both went seven games. Brooklyn took the first -- also the franchise's first championship -- behind the efforts of league MVP Roy Campanella, Duke Snider, Jackie Robinson, Don Newcombe and others.

Video: WS1956 Gm1: Robinson's solo home run off Ford

In 1956, the Yankees came out on top. Mantle was at the peak of his powers, winning the Triple Crown by batting .353 with a career-high 52 home runs and 130 RBIs in one of the greatest hitting seasons in baseball history. But the '56 Fall Classic is best remembered for one of the most legendary performances in postseason history: Don Larsen's perfect game in Game 5.

Video: 1956 WS Gm5: Don Larsen tosses a perfect game

Yankees vs. Dodgers, 1952-53
1952: Yankees defeat Dodgers, 4-3
1953: Yankees defeat Dodgers, 4-2
The Yankees and Dodgers would meet in the World Series four times in a five-season span from 1952-56. The Yankees would win three of the four meetings, including both of the first two in '52 and '53. New York had already won the previous three Fall Classic; these two wins over the Dodgers gave the Yankees a Major League-record five consecutive World Series titles.

The 1952 season was the beginning of the Mantle era in New York. It was The Mick's first full big league season, when he broke out as an All-Star and MVP candidate and hit the first two of his record 18 career World Series home runs -- which weren't just any home runs, they were the decisive home runs Game 6 and Game 7. The next season, the Yankees took the Fall Classic in six games, with Billy Martin winning the series with a walk-off single at Yankee Stadium.

Video: 1952 WS Gm7: Mantle takes Black deep in the seventh

Yankees vs. Cardinals, 1942-43
1942: Cardinals defeat Yankees, 4-1
1943: Yankees defeat Cardinals, 4-1
These two Yankees-Cardinals World Series matchups took place during a unique period in Major League Baseball history. The U.S. was fighting in World War II, and during their involvement from 1941-45 many players left the sport to serve in the military. Among them were Hall of Famers from both of these franchises: the Yankees' Joe DiMaggio, Phil Rizzuto and Red Ruffing, and the Cardinals' Stan Musial and Enos Slaughter. DiMaggio, Rizzuto, Ruffing and Slaughter were all serving in the military during the second of these World Series matchups in 1943.

The 1942 Cardinals had the NL MVP in Mort Cooper, who went 22-7 with a 1.78 ERA, and the runner-up in Slaughter. They rolled to a five-game win over New York in the Fall Classic. In 1943, the Yankees were the ones who cruised to a championship, despite Musial's emergence as a true superstar -- Stan the Man won the first of his three MVP Awards, leading the Majors in batting average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage, total bases, hits, doubles and triples.

Video: 1943WS Gm5: Spud shuts out Cards as Yanks win Series

Yankees vs. Giants, 1936-37
1936: Yankees defeat Giants, 4-2
1937: Yankees defeat Giants, 4-1
The Yankees-Giants New York rivalry included six World Series matchups over a span of three decades before the Giants moved to San Francisco. The Giants won the first two of those (more on that later), but the Yankees took the next four. That included back-to-back World Series in 1936 and '37, in the final years of the Lou Gehrig era.

With Babe Ruth having played his final Yankees season in 1934, The Iron Horse led the Yankees to their 1936 and '37 titles, the franchise's first without The Babe. Gehrig won his second career AL MVP Award in the first of those seasons, tying a career high with 49 homers. Behind Gehrig, the Yankees twice got the better of Giants teams led by Carl Hubbell (Gehrig's MVP counterpart in the NL in '36 after going 26-6 with a 2.31 ERA) and Mel Ott.

A's vs. Cardinals, 1930-31
1930: A's defeat Cardinals, 4-2
1931: Cardinals defeat A's, 4-3
Skippered by the legendary Connie Mack, the 1930 A's were a powerhouse -- their rotation was led by Lefty Grove, and their lineup by Mickey Cochrane, Al Simmons and Jimmie Foxx hitting back-to-back-to-back in the middle of the order. Grove won the pitching Triple Crown that year, going 28-5 with a 2.54 ERA and 209 strikeouts. Cochrane hit .357, Foxx hit .335 with 37 home runs and 156 RBIs, and Simmons won the batting title by hitting .381 while also belting 36 homers and driving in 165 runs. The A's title in 1930 marked their last in Philadelphia.

The next season, St. Louis won a seven-game Fall Classic behind dominant pitching from "Wild Bill" Hallahan and spitballer Burleigh Grimes. Hallahan won Games 2 and 5, and Grimes won Games 3 and 7… with Hallahan coming on in relief to close out the series. Grimes was the last Major League pitcher legally allowed to throw the spitball, grandfathered in under the old rules after MLB banned the pitch in 1920.

Yankees vs. Giants, 1921-23 (three straight World Series matchups)
1921: Giants defeat Yankees, 5-3
1922: Giants defeat Yankees, 4-0-1
1923: Yankees defeat Giants, 4-2
The Giants-Yankees World Series at the beginning of the 1920s weren't just the beginnings of the decades-long New York rivalry, they were a clash of eras. One one side were the Giants under John McGraw, playing the small-ball, run-limiting style characteristic of the dead-ball era. On the other were the powerful Yankees, led by Babe Ruth, who had slugged the sport into the live-ball era with his 54 home runs in his first Yankees season in 1920.

The Giants actually got the better of the Yankees in the first two meetings. The 1921 Fall Classic -- the Yankees' first appearance in the World Series -- was the last one played in a best-of-nine format, and the Giants clinched it with a 1-0 win in Game 8. They won again the next year, holding the Yankees winless in the series (Game 2 was a tie after the game was controversially called on account of darkness) to take home their third world championship. All the games in the 1921 and '22 World Series were played at the Polo Grounds, as Yankee Stadium wouldn't open until 1923.

In that inaugural 1923 season in The House That Ruth Built, the Yankees finally broke through with the first of their record 27 World Series championships. Ruth was the MVP of the league, hitting .393 with 41 home runs and 130 RBIs. And The Bambino homered three times in the Fall Classic, including one to open the scoring in the Yankees' clinching Game 6.

Cubs vs. Tigers, 1907-08
1907: Cubs defeat Tigers, 4-0-1
1908: Cubs defeat Tigers, 4-1
The 1907 and '08 seasons marked the Cubs' first World Series championships… and their last for the next 108 years, until the 2016 Cubs finally shattered the franchise's century-plus-long championship drought.

Wrigley Field hadn't even yet opened when the Cubs took their first Fall Classic -- they played their games at the West Side Grounds. The 1907-08 Cubs teams were led by Hall of Fame pitcher Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown, and they featured the famed Tinker-to-Evers-to-Chance double play combination. The Cubs twice bested Tigers teams led by Ty Cobb.

David Adler is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @_dadler.

These teams came back from 3-1 deficits

13 teams have reeled off three straight wins to buck the odds
MLB.com

There are few things more imposing for a team than being down three games to one in a seven-game series, but it can also be freeing. Once a club is backed into that corner, the pressure's off; either it wins three games in a row or it tips its cap and goes home for a long winter.

The odds are against the slow starters: Through 2017, only 13 teams out of 84 had come back to win a best-of-seven series after dropping three of the first four contests. Here's a look at each of those 13 "miracle" clubs and how they came all the way back to win. 

2016 World Series: Cubs over Indians
Cleveland was familiar with 3-1 deficits, having seen Lebron James and the NBA's Cavaliers come back from a 3-1 hole against the Warriors just a few months prior. But Ohioans would see their club fall on the other side this time around, thanks to a Cubs team that was desperate to end a 108-year championship drought.

There are few things more imposing for a team than being down three games to one in a seven-game series, but it can also be freeing. Once a club is backed into that corner, the pressure's off; either it wins three games in a row or it tips its cap and goes home for a long winter.

The odds are against the slow starters: Through 2017, only 13 teams out of 84 had come back to win a best-of-seven series after dropping three of the first four contests. Here's a look at each of those 13 "miracle" clubs and how they came all the way back to win. 

2016 World Series: Cubs over Indians
Cleveland was familiar with 3-1 deficits, having seen Lebron James and the NBA's Cavaliers come back from a 3-1 hole against the Warriors just a few months prior. But Ohioans would see their club fall on the other side this time around, thanks to a Cubs team that was desperate to end a 108-year championship drought.

Kris Bryant, as he did throughout the '16 postseason, came up clutch with a homer to wake up the Wrigley Field crowd in Game 5, and Addison Russell's grand slam in Game 6 sent the series to a decisive winner-take-all. Then, in one of the most memorable Fall Classic contests ever, the Cubs withstood Rajai Davis' dramatic two-run homer off Aroldis Chapman -- and a momentous rain delay -- to pull ahead on Ben Zobrist's 10th-inning RBI double. Mike Montgomery closed out the bottom half, and the "Curse of the Billy Goat" was finally over.

Video: NLCS Gm7: Romo gets popup, sends Giants to Series

2012 NLCS: Giants over Cardinals
Not only did the Giants come back in this series; they did so with authority. After winning their final three games on the road to defeat the Reds in the NLDS, San Francisco outscored St. Louis 20-1 over the final three contests to punch its second World Series ticket in three years. A resurgent Barry Zito pitched into the eighth in Game 5, and Ryan Vogelsong struck out nine in Game 6. Series MVP Marco Scutaro notched three hits in the finale to help San Francisco seal the franchise's first-ever victory in a winner-take-all Game 7.

Video: Red Sox topped Indians in memorable 2007 ALCS

2007 ALCS: Red Sox over Indians
Boston looked to be in fine shape after rocking AL Cy Young winner CC Sabathia in Game 1, but the Tribe stormed back for three straight victories to get Cleveland riled up for its first Fall Classic appearance in a decade. The Indians played the All-American Rejects' hit song "It Ends Tonight" over the loudspeakers before Game 5, but the Red Sox had other ideas. Josh Beckett dominated with 11 strikeouts to send the series back to Fenway Park, where J.D. Drew hit a grand slam to spur Boston to a 12-2 rout in Game 6. Red Sox employees played "It Ends Tonight" again before Game 7, and the home club ended things decisively, 11-2, to punch its second World Series ticket in four years.

Video: 2004 ALCS Gm 4: Roberts' steal sparks epic comeback

2004 ALCS: Red Sox over Yankees
Eighty-six years of Bambino-sized baggage was wiped away over four magical nights in October, starting with Dave Roberts' daring steal and David Ortiz's walk-off homer in Game 4. Ortiz delivered again in a 14-inning marathon the following night to make the Fenway faithful believe, and Curt Schilling's "bloody sock" performance in Game 6 in the Bronx made him a folk hero in Boston. Johnny Damon's Game 7 grand slam seemed to lift whatever burden was left from the Red Sox's shoulders, as the self-proclaimed "idiots" became the first team to erase a 3-0 postseason deficit before sweeping the Cardinals for Boston's first championship since 1918.

Video: #WeKnowPostseason: Looking back on the 2003 NLCS

2003 NLCS: Marlins over Cubs
Steve Bartman will always be the symbol of this heart-breaking series for the Cubs, but the North Siders had plenty of other chances to claim their first NL pennant since 1945. Beckett, the Marlins' emerging ace, twirled a two-hit shutout in Game 5, and Cubs shortstop Alex Gonzalez's error after Bartman's fateful reach helped the Marlins tie (and eventually win) Game 6. Chicago even held a 5-3 lead through four innings of Game 7, but could not hold on as Florida prevailed despite being outscored by two runs in the series.

1996 NLCS: Braves over Cardinals
The Braves' 1990s run was one of the most dominant by any team, but this series represented one of Atlanta's toughest tests. St. Louis was able to break through against Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine to win three of the first four contests, but -- like the Giants did in 2012 -- the Braves absolutely surged over the Cardinals once their backs were against the wall. Atlanta's three-headed monster of John Smoltz, Maddux and Glavine returned to form, but they didn't need to do all that much as Braves hitters ambushed St. Louis pitchers and outscored the Cardinals 32-1 over their last three victories.

Video: 1986 ALCS Gm5: Henderson's series-changing homer

1986 ALCS: Red Sox over Angels
Fatalism was near its peak in Boston when the "cursed" Red Sox quickly fell behind the Halos and appeared on the verge of another postseason exit. The Angels were within one strike of their first pennant in Game 5 before Red Sox center fielder Dave Henderson blasted a dramatic go-ahead grand slam, setting up an eventual 7-6 win in 11 innings. Given new life, Boston pulled away in the final two contests at Fenway Park before heartbreak struck again on a famous grounder through Bill Buckner's legs in Game 6 of the World Series.

Video: WS1985 Gm6: Denkinger calls Orta safe at first base

1985 World Series: Royals over Cardinals
Kansas City epitomized the phrase "never say die" in '85, overcoming a 3-1 deficit in the ALCS before doing it again on the biggest stage. The Royals outscored the Cardinals 28-13 in this series, but still needed a controversial call from umpire Don Denkinger to squeak out a 2-1 win in Game 6 and stay alive. K.C. capitalized on its good fortune with an 11-0 blowout of the Cardinals in Game 7, with ace Bret Saberhagen twirling a five-hit shutout to seal the franchise's first World Series championship.

1985 ALCS: Royals over Blue Jays
As mentioned, this Royals club really was a team of destiny. Kansas City took full advantage of the first year of the best-of-seven LCS format, starting with Danny Jackson's eight-hit shutout in a must-win Game 5. George Brett hit his third homer of the series to power the Royals to a 5-3 win in Game 6, and the star trio of Saberhagen, Charlie Leibrandt and Dan Quisenberry helped K.C. close out Game 7 at Toronto's Exhibition Stadium.

Video: PIT@BAL: Stargell helps Pirates win World Series

1979 World Series: Pirates over Orioles
The '79 "We Are Family" Pirates were probably one of the loosest World Series champions, with captain Willie Stargell leading a big comeback over a supremely talented Orioles squad. Stargell hit an even .400 with three homers -- including a crucial dinger late in Game 7 -- to become the first player to capture the regular season, NLCS and World Series MVP Awards all in the same season. Pirates pitchers held Baltimore to two total runs over the last three games as Pittsburgh earned its second seven-game World Series triumph over the Orioles in a span of nine years.

Video: WS1968 Gm7: Tigers win the World Series

1968 World Series: Tigers over Cardinals
If you like vintage pitching performances, this series is for you. Bob Gibson outdueled Denny McLain, baseball's last 30-game winner, in Games 1 and 4 to put St. Louis on the verge of a second straight title, but Mickey Lolich stemmed the tide with his second win of the series in Game 5 in Detroit. McLain came back on two days' rest to nearly twirl a shutout in the Tigers' 13-1 rout in Game 6, setting up a dream winner-take-all matchup between Gibson and Lolich in St. Louis. The aces traded zeroes for six frames before Jim Northrup hit a two-run triple over Curt Flood's head in center field, and that was all Lolich -- also pitching on two days' rest -- would need in Detroit's 4-1 win.

1958 World Series: Yankees over Braves
Hank Aaron and the Braves shocked the Yankees with a seven-game triumph in '57, and came oh so close to doing it again the following autumn. Warren Spahn and Lew Burdette -- who beat the Yankees three times in '57 -- combined for victories in three of the first four games, but the Yankees finally solved Burdette with six runs off the righty to stay alive in Game 5. Spahn went into the 10th inning in Game 6 before giving up a pair of runs, and Braves pinch-hitter Frank Torre lined out to end the game with Aaron representing the tying run at third base. That was the break the Yankees needed, as Bob Turley pitched 6 2/3 innings of one-run ball in relief and the pinstripes beat Burdette again, 6-2, in Game 7 in Milwaukee.

1925 World Series: Pirates over Senators
The legendary Walter Johnson had finally claimed his first championship with a heroic Game 7 performance in '24, but his luck ran out in another Game 7 the following year. Monsoon-like rain and heavy fog created perhaps the worst playing conditions of any World Series game in history, and the Senators' two blown leads didn't do anything to boost Johnson's morale. Kiki Cuyler's eighth-inning, two-run double off Washington's ace erased an original 4-0 deficit for the Pirates, who pulled off the first 3-1 comeback in postseason history.

Matt Kelly is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @mattkellyMLB.