Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon
news

This Date in History presented by Barbasol

The best season in every club's history

MLB.com

The Red Sox are on the cusp of franchise history as the regular season hits the homestretch. Boston's record 105 wins is in the 2018 club's grasp to break, marking yet another milestone in the franchise's illustrious history. 

With a dominant run this year, the Red Sox are poised for October. Yet even for clubs of yesteryear who have put together their most wins in history, it didn't always culminate with a World Series title. With that in mind, here is a recap of each club's season in which they compiled their most wins, and a breakdown of where those season stand historically. 

The Red Sox are on the cusp of franchise history as the regular season hits the homestretch. Boston's record 105 wins is in the 2018 club's grasp to break, marking yet another milestone in the franchise's illustrious history. 

With a dominant run this year, the Red Sox are poised for October. Yet even for clubs of yesteryear who have put together their most wins in history, it didn't always culminate with a World Series title. With that in mind, here is a recap of each club's season in which they compiled their most wins, and a breakdown of where those season stand historically. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Blue Jays
Year: 1985 | Record: 99-62
The '85 Jays won the franchise's first division title as they edged the Yankees in the AL East. That sent them into an AL Championship Series matchup against the Royals. In the first year of a seven-game LCS, Toronto and Kansas City needed all seven. The Blue Jays held a 3-1 lead, but the Royals rallied to win the series in Game 7 and went on to win the World Series too.

Video: Relive the epic 1985 ALCS between Blue Jays, Royals

Orioles
Year: 1969 | Record: 109-53
In the first year of the Divisional Era, the Orioles rolled to a franchise-record 109 wins behind the Hall of Fame trio of Frank Robinson, Brooks Robinson and Jim Palmer. They also had AL Cy Young Award-winner Mike Cuellar and the runner-up for the AL MVP Award, Boog Powell. In the inaugural ALCS, the O's swept the Twins, but they fell to the Miracle Mets in the World Series.

Rays
Year: 2008 | Record: 97-65
After a decade of being lovable losers, the Rays vaulted into contention in 2008. Under manager Joe Maddon, and with veterans like Carlos Pena and James Shields and rookies Evan Longoria and David Price, the Rays won the AL East and the AL pennant, making it to the World Series for the first time. 

Video: '08 ALCS, Gm 7: The Rays win the AL pennant

Red Sox
Year: 1912 | Record: 105-47
The Curse of the Bambino had not yet begun -- Babe Ruth was still two years away from starting his Major League career -- when the Red Sox set their single-season record for wins. Hall of Famer Tris Speaker won the AL MVP Award by hitting .383 with an AL-best 10 home runs, and Smoky Joe Wood went 34-5 with a 1.91 ERA, 258 strikeouts and 10 shutouts on the mound. Boston beat the Giants, 4-3-1, in an eight-game World Series, rallying for two runs in the bottom of the 10th inning to beat Christy Mathewson in the deciding game.

Yankees
Year: 1998 | Record: 114-48
Regarded as one of the greatest teams of all time, the 1998 Yankees set a then-AL record with 114 wins. Behind the Core Four of Derek Jeter, Jorge Posada, Andy Pettitte and Mariano Rivera, and with Joe Torre at the helm, they steamrolled their way to a World Series title, sweeping the Padres in the Fall Classic. An honorable mention goes to the 1927 Yankees -- another of the greatest teams in history, led by Ruth (in his 60-homer season) and Lou Gehrig -- who went 110-44 and actually had a slightly higher winning percentage than the '98 team (.714 vs. .704) in a shorter season, while also sweeping the World Series.

Video: 1998 Yankees on reuniting for 20-year anniversary

AL CENTRAL

Indians
Year: 1954 | Record: 111-43
The '54 Indians hold the AL's single-season for winning percentage at .721. Led by Hall of Famers Larry Doby, Early Wynn and Bob Lemon, they cruised to the pennant even with the Yankees winning 103 games behind them. But in the World Series, they were swept by the Giants -- a Fall Classic that featured maybe the most iconic play in baseball history: Willie Mays' "The Catch" in center field at the Polo Grounds.

Royals
Year: 1977 | Record: 102-60
Led by Hall of Famer George Brett, the '77 Royals established a franchise record with 102 wins en route to the AL West title. They advanced to the ALCS, where they faced another 100-win team in the Yankees, who defeated Kansas City in five games before going on to win the World Series, thanks to Reggie Jackson becoming Mr. October.

Video: ALCS Gm5: Yankees, Royals empty benches

Tigers
Year: 1984 | Record: 104-58
The 1984 Tigers has one of the best starts ever to a season, going 35-5 in their first 40 games, and they never looked back. Detroit led the AL East wire-to-wire, set a franchise record with 104 wins and beat the Padres in five games to win the World Series. Alan Trammell and Jack Morris, who were each enshrined to the Hall of Fame in 2018, led the way in the lineup and the rotation, respectively, and reliever Willie Hernandez won both the AL Cy Young Award and MVP Award. The '84 team doesn't have the highest winning percentage in Detroit's history -- the '34 Tigers (101-53), '15 Tigers (100-54) and '09 Tigers (98-54) all edged them -- but only the '84 Tigers won the World Series out of that group.

Video: 1984 WS Gm5: Trammell on winning World Series MVP

Twins
Year: 1965 | Record: 102-60
The '65 Twins brought the franchise its first AL pennant after moving to Minnesota in '61. Harmon Killebrew, Tony Oliva and AL MVP Award-winner Zoilo Versalles led the Twins into the World Series against the Dodgers, but they were bested in a seven-game thriller thanks to the heroics of Sandy Koufax, who famously did not pitch in Game 1 on Yom Kippur but went on to throw shutouts in Game 5 and Game 7. The two other Twins teams of note (pre-move to Minnesota) for the purposes here were the '33 Senators (99-53) and '25 Senators (96-55), who had the two best winning percentages in franchise history.

White Sox
Year: 1917 | Record: 100-54
The only 100-game winner in White Sox franchise history was the '17 team. (The World Series-winning '05 team is second with 99 wins.) Led by the dominant duo of Eddie Cicotte and Red Faber atop the starting rotation, and with the likes of Eddie Collins and Shoeless Joe Jackson in the lineup, Chicago won the AL pennant and the World Series, beating the Giants in six games.

AL WEST

Angels
Year: 2008 | Record: 100-62
The team with the most wins in Angels history is not the '02 World Series champion team, which won 99 games, but the '08 team, which is the Angels' only 100-game winner. Francisco Rodriguez saved 62 of those 100 wins, setting the Major League single-season saves record. With a lineup led by Vladimir Guerrero, midseason acquisition Mark Teixeira and Torii Hunter, and a rotation fronted by Ervin Santana, the Angels won the AL West before falling to the Red Sox in the ALDS.

Astros
Year: 1998 | Record: 102-60
Last year's World Series winners came close to the franchise wins record, going 101-61, but they were ultimately one win short of the '98 Astros' total. The '98 club won the NL Central behind the Killer B's duo of Jeff Bagwell and Craig Biggio and the dominant Randy Johnson, who went 10-1 with a 1.28 ERA after being traded from the Mariners at the end of July. Houston would fall to the Padres in the NLDS.

Video: Biggio compares 1998 Astros to 2017 World Series team

Athletics
Year: 1931 | Record: 107-45
The A's were still in Philadelphia when they set their single-season wins mark. Under legendary manager Connie Mack, the '31 A's had a dominant lineup led by the Hall of Fame trio of Al Simmons, Jimmie Foxx and Mickey Cochrane. But their best player was Lefty Grove, who won the AL MVP Award after going 31-4 with 2.06 ERA and 175 strikeouts to win the Triple Crown for a second straight year. The '31 World Series was a rematch of the previous year -- A's vs. Cardinals -- but while the A's had won in '30, the Cardinals beat them in seven games in '31.

Mariners
Year: 2001 | Record: 116-46
This is, of course, the Mariners team that tied the MLB single-season wins record. Only the '01 Mariners and the 1906 Cubs have won 116 games. The Mariners won the AL West by 14 games despite the second-place A's winning 102 games themselves. Ichiro Suzuki was the catalyst, leading the league in batting average (.350), hits (242) and stolen bases (56) in his first MLB season en route winning both the AL Rookie of the Year and MVP Awards. But Seattle couldn't turn their historic regular season into a World Series title, as they fell to the Yankees in the ALCS in five games. 

Video: A look back at Ichiro's historic 2001 rookie season

Rangers
Year: 2011 | Record: 96-66
The '11 Rangers were oh-so-close to winning the World Series. They were an out away from clinching a title in both the ninth and 10th inning of Game 6 before the Cardinals rallied -- a game best remembered for David Freese's game-tying triple in the ninth and walk-off homer in the 11th -- and took the series in seven games. But the '11 Rangers were a great team nonetheless, especially on the offensive side, with a deep lineup featuring Adrian Beltre, Ian Kinsler, Josh Hamilton, Nelson Cruz and Mike Napoli.

Video: Must C Classic: Freese's walk-off shot forces Game 7

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

Braves
Year: 1998 | Record: 106-56
There arguably wasn't a more consistent club in the Modern Era for as extended of a period as the Braves during their 14-year run of winning consecutive division titles from 1991-2005. In that stretch, Atlanta won 100 games or more six times, but none more than their 106 in 1998. However, as was the case with most of those Braves teams, they fell short in October, losing to the Padres in a crushing NL Championship Series defeat.

Video: Schuerholz on 1990s Braves teams

Marlins
Year: 1997 | Record: 92-70
In just their fifth year of existence, the Marlins clinched their first postseason berth by claiming the NL Wild Card in 1997 behind a young, blossoming lineup that wasn't particularly powerful, but was effective nonetheless. Despite finishing 11 games back of Atlanta in the NL East standings, the Marlins went on to defeat the Braves in six games in the NLCS, then won a thrilling, seven-game World Series over the Indians.

Mets
Year: 1986 | Record: 108-54
The 1986 season remains the best in history for the Mets, and it wasn't just because of the success or the culmination of winning the World Series, but perhaps just as much its personalities that made that club so memorable. A 21-year-old taking the Majors by storm (Dwight Gooden), a polished Ivy League graduate (Ron Darling), an eccentric outfield tandem (Lenny Dykstra and Darryl Strawberry) a candid and clutch-hitting first baseman (Keith Hernandez) and more comprised a club that fans still remember fondly today. 

Video: Mets honor 30-year anniversary of 1986 team

Nationals
Year: 2012 | Record: 98-64
The 2012 season marked the dawn of a new era in Washington that proved to have sustained success. Bryce Harper, the club's No. 1 lived up to his lofty hype while winning the NL Rookie of the Year Award and looked to be the potential face of baseball. And with a surrounding cast of Ian Desmond, Ryan Zimmerman and Adam LaRoche to go with a pitching staff that included Stephen Strasburg, Jordan Zimmermann and Gio Gonzalez, the Nats began a run of six seasons in which they'd reach the postseason four times. Though the 98 wins in '12 set a club record, the franchise actually had a higher winning percentage in the strike-shortened '94 season, at .649, when they were the Montreal Expos. 

Video: Harper receives the 2012 NL Rookie of the Year award

Phillies
Year: 2011 | Record: 102-60
One would be hard-pressed to find a more dominant starting rotation in recent memory than the '11 Phillies, who collectively compiled a 2.86 ERA and included three All-Stars: Cole Hamels, Cliff Lee and Roy Halladay, who all finished in the top five of the NL Cy Young voting. Alas, the Phillies, who had won two of the three previous NL pennants, were upset in the NLDS by the red-hot, eventual-champion Cardinals.

NL CENTRAL

Brewers
Year: 2011 | Record: 96-60
The summer of 2011 was a special one in Milwaukee. Ryan Braun went on to capture the NL MVP Award, Prince Fielder clubbed his way to 38 home runs while playing in all 162 games and Zack Greinke, the Brewers' prized offseason trade acquisition, anchored a rotation that supplemented a dominant bullpen. In the postseason, the Brewers fell to the rival and eventual champion Cardinals in a six-game NLCS.

Cardinals
Year: 1942 | Record: 106-48
The Rookie of the Year Award didn't come into existence until 1947, but had it been in place, Stan Musial might have had a strong case for the honor. Behind Musial and Hall of Fame outfielder Enos Slaughter, who finished as runner-up for the NL MVP Award, the Cards won the NL pennant by just two games over the Dodgers, leading the league in runs scored (755), batting average (.268), on-base percentage (.338) and slugging percentage (.379). St. Louis went on to defeat the Yankees in the World Series, 4-1.

Cubs
Year: 1906 | Record: 116-36
To find the best Cubs team ever, at least in terms of wins, one would have to search all the way back to the pre-Wrigley Field era, when the club couldn't even boast the North Siders moniker they now bear because it would've been geographically inaccurate. The 1906 Cubs, who called West Side Park home, won 116 games, which remains tied with the '01 Mariners for most ever, yet the Cubs did so in a 152-game schedule, making their .763 win percentage the highest on record (since 1900).

Pirates
Year: 1909 | Record: 110-42
Pittsburgh edged out the two-time defending champion Cubs for the NL pennant by 6 1/2 games, then went on to win its first World Series in franchise history in a thrilling, seven-game set against the Ty Cobb-led Tigers. That season, eventual Hall of Fame shortstop Honus Wagner compiled a .339/.420/.489 slash line with 100 RBIs, all MLB highs, as the Pirates paced the Majors with 699 runs scored. The 1909 season also marked the fourth NL pennant won under manager Fred Clarke, who played left field for the club during his tenure. The Clarke-led 1902 Pirates still hold the club's highest win percentage (.741), though that was accomplished with a shorter schedule (they went 103-36).

Reds
Year: 1975 | Record: 108-54
The Big Red Machine took the Majors by storm in the mid-70s, winning back-to-back World Series in 1975-76 with a combined 210 wins. Their '75 club, led by Hall of Famers Joe Morgan, Pete Rose and Tony Perez, won the NL pennant by a whopping 20 games, then played a thrilling, seven-game World Series against the Red Sox. Morgan that year won the NL MVP Award. 

NL WEST

D-backs
Year: 1999 | Record: 100-62
The D-backs made an almost immediate impact as a mid-90s expansion team, reaching the postseason in just their second year of existence in 1999. They won the NL West by 14 games and finished behind only the Braves (103-59) for the Majors' best record. Randy Johnson, the club's blockbuster free-agent signee the offseason prior, won the first of four straight NL Cy Young Awards he would claim with Arizona, leading the Majors with a whopping 364 strikeouts and 271 2/3 innings pitched in '99, both marks that would be unheard of in today's game. The D-backs won just one playoff game that year, but their '99 season set the foundation for the World Series title they would claim two years later.

Dodgers
Year: 1953 | Record: 105-49
After suffering a heartbreaking World Series defeat to the crosstown-rival Yankees the season prior, the Dodgers, in Brooklyn at the time, went on to win 105 games behind the likes of Jackie Robinson, Duke Snider, Roy Campanella and Pee Wee Reese, who each are now enshrined in the Hall of Fame. Alas, Brooklyn was once again victim in the postseason to the juggernaut Yankees, who that year won their fifth straight championship. The most wins by a Dodgers club that called Los Angeles home is 104, compiled by the 2017 team, which lost the World Series in seven games to the Astros.

Giants
Year: 1904 | Record: 106-47
The 1904 Giants won a franchise-record 106 wins, yet have no World Series title to show for it after the Fall Classic was canceled when the Giants refused to play the AL-pennant-winning Boston Americans. According to Baseball Reference, as the 1904 season culminated, Giants brass did not sit well with the idea of playing the crosstown New York Highlanders, who lost their lead in the AL standings until the final days of the season. But by the time Boston supplanted the Highlanders, the Giants stood firm on their decision. The 1904 season remained the first break in postseason play until the strike-shortened 1994 campaign. The most wins by a San Francisco Giants club is 103, done in 1962 and 1993, neither of which led to championships.

Padres
Year: 1998 | Record: 98-64
Behind five All-Stars -- pitchers Andy Ashby, Kevin Brown, and Trevor Hoffman, and outfielders Tony Gwynn and Greg Vaughn -- the Padres surged through the NL playoffs by defeating the Astros and heavily-favored Braves before falling in the World Series to the Yankees, whose '98 club remains arguably its best in the franchise's storied history.

Video: Take a look back at the 1998 Padres magical run

Rockies
Year: 2009 | Record: 92-70
Fans will remember the '07 Rocktober as perhaps the best year in the franchise's young history, but the '09 team might've pulled of just as an impressive of a midseason turnaround. At 18-28 and with the clubhouse supposedly lost, Colorado fired manager Clint Hurdle and promoted Jim Tracy, who anchored a turnaround that culminated the club's third ever postseason berth. Tracy was named NL Manager of the Year.

10 notable examples of 3-team trades

MLB.com

When it comes to pulling off a trade, three is sometimes not a crowd, but a necessity.

Such was the case Thursday, when the Indians, Mariners and Rays all got together to manufacture a complicated but interesting transaction. Edwin Encarnacion jumped from Cleveland to Seattle, switching teams with fellow slugger Carlos Santana. Meanwhile, the Tribe also flipped infielder Yandy Diaz and prospect Cole Sulser to the Rays for first baseman/outfielder Jake Bauers. Cash and a Competitive Balance Round B Draft pick also changed hands.

When it comes to pulling off a trade, three is sometimes not a crowd, but a necessity.

Such was the case Thursday, when the Indians, Mariners and Rays all got together to manufacture a complicated but interesting transaction. Edwin Encarnacion jumped from Cleveland to Seattle, switching teams with fellow slugger Carlos Santana. Meanwhile, the Tribe also flipped infielder Yandy Diaz and prospect Cole Sulser to the Rays for first baseman/outfielder Jake Bauers. Cash and a Competitive Balance Round B Draft pick also changed hands.

It's far too early to know how this all will play out, but given the talent involved, it certainly could be remembered someday as one of the biggest three-team deals ever executed.

With that in mind, here is a look back at 10 of the most notable three-way trades from recent history:

July 30, 2015: A baker's dozen
BRAVES GOT: Hector Olivera (from LAD), Paco Rodriguez (LAD), Zachary Bird (LAD), competitive balance pick (MIA)
DODGERS GOT: Alex Wood (ATL), Jose Peraza (ATL), Bronson Arroyo (ATL), Luis Avilan (ATL), Jim Johnson (ATL), Mat Latos (MIA), Mike Morse (MIA)
MARLINS GOT: Victor Araujo (LAD), Kevin Guzman (LAD), Jeff Brigham (MIA)

This ludicrously complicated deal stands out more for its sheer size and strangeness than any impact it had on the field. Of the 13 players involved, Wood has provided far and away the most production for his acquiring team, becoming a key rotation piece in L.A. Notably, Peraza became part of another three-team deal less than six months later, going to Cincinnati as part of a transaction that also involved the White Sox acquiring Todd Frazier.

Video: LAD@LAA: Wood K's Trout swinging to end the 1st

Dec. 9, 2014: Trea to D.C. -- eventually
NATIONALS GOT: Trea Turner (PTBNL from SD), Joe Ross (SD)
PADRES GOT: Wil Myers (TB), Ryan Hanigan (TB), Jose Castillo (TB), Gerardo Reyes (TB)
RAYS GOT: Steven Souza Jr. (WSH), Jake Bauers (SD), Rene Rivera (SD), Burch Smith (SD), Travis Ott (WSH)

While it could be viewed as two distinct trades, this deal was effectively a three-way concoction -- and one that might leave a bad taste for fans of the Padres and Rays. That's because of the emergence of Turner, who was selected 13th overall in the 2014 MLB Draft and could not be officially included in the trade until a year after that, under the rules in effect at the time. Turner since has become a star shortstop and one of MLB's top basestealers in Washington. Both Bauers and Souza since have been involved in other three-team trades, with Souza going to Arizona in February 2018, and Bauers to Cleveland as noted above.

Dec. 5, 2014: Didi to NYC
D-BACKS GOT: Robbie Ray (from DET), Domingo Leyba (DET)
TIGERS GOT: Shane Greene (NYY)
YANKEES GOT: Didi Gregorius (ARI)

This was Gregorius' second big three-teamer in two years (see below), and it thrust him into quite a spotlight. Derek Jeter had just wrapped up his career in the Bronx, and the Yankees needed a shortstop. Gregorius stepped in admirably and since then has gradually shaken off his label as a defensive specialist. Greene and Ray also have tasted some success, with Ray an All-Star in 2017 for Arizona.

July 31, 2014: Tigers meet Rays' Price
MARINERS GOT: Austin Jackson (from DET)
RAYS GOT: Willy Adames (DET), Drew Smyly (DET), Nick Franklin (SEA)
TIGERS GOT: David Price (TB)

The prize of the Trade Deadline, Price ultimately spent exactly one year in Detroit before he was dealt to Toronto in 2015, but he gave the Tigers a 2.90 ERA over 32 starts. It still remains to be seen how much they gave up for that performance, with Adames showing promise as a Rays rookie in '18 after years as a top prospect.

Video: DET@NYY: Price fans 10, goes 8 2/3 in Tigers debut

Dec. 11, 2012: Didi, Part I
D-BACKS GOT: Gregorius (from CIN), Tony Sipp (CLE), Lars Anderson (CLE)
INDIANS GOT: Trevor Bauer (ARI), Bryan Shaw (ARI), Matt Albers (ARI), Drew Stubbs (CIN)
REDS GOT: Shin-Soo Choo (CLE), Jason Donald (CLE)

Quite a bit of talent changed hands in this trade. Cleveland made out particularly well, taking advantage of Arizona's impatience with Bauer (the third overall pick in 2011) and also landing Shaw, who became a key bullpen piece for the next five seasons. Cincinnati only got one season of Choo before he reached free agency, but it featured a .423 OBP. Gregorius' tenure in the desert also was brief, as previously discussed.

July 31, 2010: Klubot, activate
CARDINALS GOT: Jake Westbrook (from CLE), Nick Greenwood (SD)
INDIANS GOT: Corey Kluber (SD)
PADRES GOT: Ryan Ludwick (STL)

St. Louis got a solid veteran starting pitcher in Westbrook, while Ludwick struggled in San Diego. Kluber wasn't a household name at the time, as a former fourth-round pick who was in Double-A, but four years later, he was the American League Cy Young Award winner.

Dec. 8, 2009: Max value
D-BACKS GOT: Ian Kennedy (from NYY), Edwin Jackson (DET)
TIGERS GOT: Max Scherzer (ARI), Austin Jackson (NYY), Phil Coke (NYY), Daniel Schlereth (ARI)
YANKEES GOT: Curtis Granderson (DET)

This is just a fun trade all around, though less so for the D-backs, who got decent value over three-plus seasons from Kennedy and a no-hitter from Jackson while giving up too early on Scherzer. The 11th overall pick in the 2006 MLB Draft made only 37 starts for Arizona before continuing his development in Detroit, where he won his first Cy Young Award in '13. The Tigers came away with not only Scherzer, but five seasons of a valuable starting center fielder (Jackson). Granderson put together four productive seasons in the Bronx -- including two with 40-plus homers -- before moving on to the Mets.

Video: Max Scherzer wins his first Cy Young Award

Dec. 11, 2008: "It was a mess"
INDIANS GOT: Joe Smith (from NYM), Luis Valbuena (SEA)
MARINERS GOT: Franklin Gutierrez (CLE), Jason Vargas (NYM), Aaron Heilman (NYM), Endy Chavez (NYM), Ezequiel Carrera (NYM), Mike Carp (NYM), Maikel Cleto (NYM)
METS GOT: J.J. Putz (SEA), Sean Green (SEA), Jeremy Reed (SEA)

Ten years later, it's hard to say this was a true blockbuster. Smith's "mess" assessment -- recently shared with MLB.com's Anthony Castrovince -- seems more accurate. But this massive deal executed at the 2008 Winter Meetings remains fascinating. It ultimately backfired on the Mets, who got little from Putz, previously a top closer in Seattle. Smith, Vargas, Gutierrez, and the late Valbuena went on to greater success afterward, though none of the dozen players involved was bound for stardom.

July 31, 2008: Mannywood is born
DODGERS GOT: Manny Ramirez (from BOS)
PIRATES GOT: Brandon Moss (BOS), Craig Hansen (BOS), Andy LaRoche (LAD), Bryan Morris (LAD)
RED SOX GOT: Jason Bay (PIT)

Ramirez's highly successful and tumultuous tenure in Boston finally came to an end, as he was shipped off to L.A. The immediate result was an all-time great stretch run that included a .396/.489/.743 slash line and 17 home runs in 53 games. The Sox didn't come away empty-handed, either, as Bay posted a 36-homer, 119-RBI season in 2009. No such luck for the Bucs, with only Moss going on to success -- after he'd moved on from Pittsburgh.

July 31, 2004: Tour de fource
CUBS GOT: Nomar Garciaparra (from BOS), Matt Murton (BOS)
EXPOS GOT: Alex Gonzalez (CHC), Brendan Harris (CHC), Francis Beltran (CHC)
RED SOX GOT: Orlando Cabrera (MON), Doug Mientkiewicz (MIN)
TWINS GOT: Justin Jones (CHC)

While this technically wasn't a three-team trade, it's certainly worth mentioning here, as a rare example of a deal that required more than three clubs to complete. It took place a month after Carlos Beltran went from the Royals to the Astros in a three-way transaction that also had major postseason implications. In this case, Garciaparra was the biggest name involved, as a five-time All-Star and two-time batting champion. But Cabrera brought a steadier glove at shortstop and played well in his short stint in Boston before leaving as a free agent. Mientkiewicz secured his own place in Sox history, catching the final out of the World Series at first base as the club snapped its infamous championship drought.

Andrew Simon is a research analyst for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @AndrewSimonMLB.

These are the 25 best baseball movies

MLB.com

Baseball is older than the movies themselves, and the first baseball movies featured well-recognized baseball players as the stars themselves; in many ways, they were our first movie stars. Right Off the Bat, widely considered the first baseball flick ever made, came out in 1915, the same year as the morally loathsome but cinematically groundbreaking The Birth of a Nation, and it starred John "Mugsy" McGraw as himself. McGraw actually appeared in dozens of movies that decade. The film industry was trying to capture America, and nothing was more American than baseball.

In the more than 100 years since, some of the most beloved movies made have been about baseball, and why not? Baseball's story is the story of our times, with heroes and villains, glory and scandal, triumph and failure, comedy and tragedy. It remains the most cinematic of our sports because it is, at its core, about human beings and their frailties and their glories. If baseball had never existed, the movies would have had to invent it.

Baseball is older than the movies themselves, and the first baseball movies featured well-recognized baseball players as the stars themselves; in many ways, they were our first movie stars. Right Off the Bat, widely considered the first baseball flick ever made, came out in 1915, the same year as the morally loathsome but cinematically groundbreaking The Birth of a Nation, and it starred John "Mugsy" McGraw as himself. McGraw actually appeared in dozens of movies that decade. The film industry was trying to capture America, and nothing was more American than baseball.

In the more than 100 years since, some of the most beloved movies made have been about baseball, and why not? Baseball's story is the story of our times, with heroes and villains, glory and scandal, triumph and failure, comedy and tragedy. It remains the most cinematic of our sports because it is, at its core, about human beings and their frailties and their glories. If baseball had never existed, the movies would have had to invent it.

Thus, sitting down to make a list of the best 25 baseball movies ever made is quite the challenge. You must consider their historical importance in the annals of cinematic lore ... but also, hey, it's baseball: This is supposed to be fun. I'm sure there are movies not on here that might make your list. But to me, these are the 25 baseball movies that best reflect what the sport is, both on screen and in the real world. Remember: There is no crying in baseball, but sometimes, there is crying in baseball movies.

25. For Love of the Game (1999)

One of three Kevin Costner baseball movies, this is definitely the worst of them but still has its moments: I will think about it every time a veteran pitcher takes a no-hitter late into the game, for the rest of my life. Plus: John C. Reilly was born to play a catcher.

24. Cobb (1994)

Tommy Lee Jones plays the Tiger, both his warts and his ... well, also his warts. There has been some historical revisionism on Cobb in recent years, but Jones is Cobb at his worst: cruel, ornery and, of course, as great at baseball as anyone who ever played.

23. 61* (2001)

Billy Crystal's ode to the home run chase between Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris is basically Baby Boomer catnip.

22. Angels in the Outfield (1994)

I'm showing my age here, but I prefer the silly Christopher Lloyd remake for Disney (with a young Joseph Gordon-Levitt!) than the original with Janet Leigh.

Video: Mike Trout on favorite baseball movies

21. Mr. 3000 (2004)

This raucous comedy featuring Bernie Mac as a retired player who comes back to the game years after retiring to get his 3,000th hit has a little more emotional resonance than you might have suspected.

20. Rookie of the Year (1993)

Having your favorite team -- the Cubs, no less! -- just pick you from the stands and have you pitch for them is a childhood fantasy that any kid can relate to.

19. 42 (2013)

The story of Jackie Robinson's and Branch Rickey's battles to integrate baseball benefits greatly from its stars, Harrison Ford and a pre-Black Panther Chadwick Boseman.

Video: Network honors Jackie with look at what set him apart

18. Fear Strikes Out (1957)

Anthony Perkins might look like he'd never touched a baseball in his life before this movie, but his portrayal of former Red Sox star Jimmy Piersall's battles with mental illness is excellent, and the film is rather daring for its time.

17. Sugar (2008)

This independent drama about a Dominican baseball player and his struggles to both survive and acclimate himself in the Minor Leagues is one of the more underappreciated movies of the last decade.

16. Damn Yankees (1958)

The classic musical about a man who loves his Washington Senators so much he'll sell his soul to the devil for them to beat the Yankees got a rousing film version as well. People still call the Yankees this 60 years later.

15. Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949)

An old-school Technicolor musical directed by Busby Berkeley, starring Gene Kelly, Esther Williams and Frank Sinatra. Why haven't you seen this yet?

Video: Bauer talks about his favorite baseball movies

14. The Rookie (2002)

This story of Jim Morris, the high school science teacher who ended up making the big leagues at the age of 35, is a classic underdog tale that has the useful advantage of being based on a true story.

13. The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings (1976)

This period piece about a group of Negro League stars putting together a traveling team that takes the country by storm in the 1930s has an almost cartoonishly awesome cast: Billy Dee Williams, James Earl Jones and Richard Pryor.

12. Bang the Drum Slowly (1973)

One of the best baseball weepies out there, this features a then-unknown Robert De Niro as a good-hearted but dim catcher who contracts a terminal illness and develops a friendship with the team's intellectual star pitcher.

11. The Bad News Bears (1976)

The classic raucous Little League comedy with Walter Matthau got an unfortunate remake 29 years later, but the original still packs a punch today. Kelly Leak forever!

10. Major League (1989)

This is absolutely the movie that every baseball player you know probably puts at No. 1.

Video: Rose and Millar play 'Major League' Trivia on IT

9. Everybody Wants Some!! (2016)

Underappreciated when it came out a couple of years ago (many people thought Richard Linklater's follow-up to Boyhood was going to be far more serious than it was) this is one of the most purely fun, and quietly moving, looks at what it means to be on a college baseball team there has ever been. And we'll be looking at this cast in 20 years the way we look at the cast of Dazed and Confused now.

Video: Cast of 'Everybody Wants Some!!' discusses the movie

8. The Sandlot (1993)

The kids classic sneaked up on people when it was released, but its nostalgia is even more powerful now. And it has the one quote you'll surely see on a T-shirt every time you go to a game: "You're killin' me, Smalls!"

Video: Sandlot the Movie reunion at Dodger Stadium

7. The Natural (1984)

Director Barry Levinson changed the ending to let Roy Hobbs be the hero Robert Redford played him as, and while the book might have more tragic resonance, the movie sure does hit the romantic sweet spot.

6. Moneyball (2011)

The movie about math and data in baseball has a cheerful love of the sport, too, and Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill are an oddly perfect team.

5. Eight Men Out (1988)

Writer-director John Sayles' story of the Black Sox takes a literary, smart look at what remains the worst scandal in baseball's history.

4. Field of Dreams (1989)

Dads and their kids will cry every time they hear "have a catch" for the rest of time because of this movie.

3. The Pride of the Yankees (1942)

Gary Cooper is an instantly iconic Lou Gehrig -- people to this day still think Gehrig looked like Cooper -- and don't forget the terrific portrayal of Babe Ruth by ... Babe Ruth!

2. A League of Their Own (1992)

A movie that has baseball in its bones as few other movies do, and one that tells a terrific story that few people even knew about. The cast is terrific top to bottom -- even Madonna is good in it! -- and the movie has the good fortune of having Tom Hanks as the crusty manager just before he became the biggest movie star in the world.

Video: SEA@BOS: Shirley, Maybelle on A League of Their Own

1. Bull Durham (1988)

The conversations on the mound. The tricks for getting out of a slump. The managerial motivational tactics. Which hand to swing with in a fight. Bull Durham is a movie that understands the romance and madness of baseball better than any movie ever has, and it has an all-timer cast. The only thing better than watching this movie is watching an actual baseball game. And only barely.

Video: Former players make the case for Bull Durham

Will Leitch is a columnist for MLB.com.

Biggest free-agent deals in Winter Meetings history

MLB.com

The Winter Meetings are often the setting in which baseball's Hot Stove activity escalates, and they could be especially enthralling this year. The Meetings officially begin Monday at Las Vegas' Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, and the availability of Bryce Harper and Manny Machado -- two 26-year-old free agents capable of commanding record free-agents contracts -- raises the stakes in a city known for such action.

Before we find out if the Harper and Machado markets will start to sizzle in Sin City, here's a trip down memory lane to look at the biggest free-agent deals in Winter Meetings history:

The Winter Meetings are often the setting in which baseball's Hot Stove activity escalates, and they could be especially enthralling this year. The Meetings officially begin Monday at Las Vegas' Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, and the availability of Bryce Harper and Manny Machado -- two 26-year-old free agents capable of commanding record free-agents contracts -- raises the stakes in a city known for such action.

Before we find out if the Harper and Machado markets will start to sizzle in Sin City, here's a trip down memory lane to look at the biggest free-agent deals in Winter Meetings history:

2014: Goodbye, goat
The 2014 Cubs were a last-place team, but the arrival of Joe Maddon, maturation of Anthony Rizzo, readiness of Kris Bryant and breakout of Jake Arrieta all had the arrow pointed upward. Forgoing the offers of his former team, the Red Sox, and the defending World Series champion Giants, Jon Lester opted to reunite with Theo Epstein and join a Cubs club that, billy goat curse be damned, appeared to be on the cusp of something special. The contract announced at the Winter Meetings in San Diego was definitely special -- six years, $155 million. It was the largest in Cubs franchise history and gave Lester what was, at the time, the second-largest average annual value for a pitcher all time.

The Cubs stormed to a Wild Card spot and then the National League Championship Series in 2015. The following year, they ended a 108-year World Series title drought, with Lester providing pivotal relief in Game 7.

Video: A look at Lester's introduction to the Cubs

2012: Small deals, big dividends
The theme here is "big deal," but let's interject a reminder that it doesn't take a blockbuster to build a title team. In the 2013 season, the Red Sox reaped the rewards of two lower-profile signings that both occurred at the Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn. Having been recently freed from the entanglement of the Carl Crawford contract with an August waiver deal for the ages, the Red Sox went into the winter of 2012-13 interested only in short-term investments with second-tier free-agent options. At the Meetings, they came to terms on identical three-year, $39 million agreements with Shane Victorino and Mike Napoli (though the Napoli deal would ultimately be reworked because of his hip condition).

In 2013, Victorino (.801 OPS, 15 homers, 26 doubles) and Napoli (.842 OPS, 23 homers, 38 doubles) were instrumental in Boston's third World Series title in a 10-season span.

2011: Halo, Albert
Traditionally, the final day of the Winter Meetings is highlighted only by the Rule 5 Draft, which takes place as many executives are pouring out the doors and headed to the airport. But in Dallas in 2011, many people in the industry were packing up or boarding their flights when word spread that the Angels and Albert Pujols had agreed to a gigantic 10-year, $240 million contract. The deal, which came on the heels of the Halos signing C.J. Wilson to a five-year, $77.5 million deal, upended a Meetings that had been notable mainly for the Marlins' activity (signing Jose Reyes, Mark Buehrle and Heath Bell).

In the end, neither the Marlins nor the Angels got the expected return on investment from signing these stars, but Pujols has reached 500 and 600 homers and many other career milestones with the Angels.

2010: Werth the price?
On the opposite end of the timing spectrum from the Pujols deal was the Jayson Werth deal with the Nationals a year earlier. This one came to light just as folks were arriving to the Winter Meetings in Orlando, Fla. And the news that the Nats, who had lost 93 games in 2010, had inked the 31-year-old Werth to a seven-year, $126 million deal was certainly a stunner.

Whereas the seven-year, $142 million deal the Red Sox agreed to with Crawford later that week can be regarded as a total disaster, analysis of the Werth deal requires more nuance. He was never an All-Star in Washington, but the Nats do credit him with helping them mature into a division winner. He also hit the biggest home run in franchise history in the 2012 NL Division Series.

2008: Leaving Las Vegas
One of the biggest Winter Meetings deals did not actually take place at the Winter Meetings. And that's what made it so captivating.

On the second day of the 2008 Meetings at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, word spread that Yankees GM Brian Cashman was so encouraged by conversations with CC Sabathia that he had left the building and flown to the Bay Area to make his final pitch to the big left-hander. Sabathia's first inclination had been to return to his California roots, but a record-setting seven-year, $161 million deal lured him to the East Coast. The Yanks won the World Series in Sabathia's first year with the club.

2000: Big deals in Big D
If Harper and Machado both sign in Vegas, it will be a throwback, of sorts, to what went down in 2000. Prior to the 2000 Winter Meetings in Dallas, baseball had never had a player making $20 million a year. By the end of those Meetings, there were two -- Manny Ramirez and Alex Rodriguez.

Ramirez's eight-year, $160 million deal with the Red Sox and A-Rod's record-setting 10-year, $252 million deal with the Rangers were announced within 24 hours of each other. Nobody knew at the time what repercussions those two contracts would have in the game's greatest rivalry, as it would be three seasons before Rodriguez was dealt to the Yankees. But over the life of that initial 10-year contract, A-Rod won three AL MVP Awards and the 2009 World Series, while Ramirez won six straight Silver Slugger honors and two World Series in his colorful and memorable time in Boston.

1998: The $100 Million Man
The Winter Meetings have proven to be a place where teams push contractual boundaries over the years. In '98 in Nashville, the Dodgers did it with their seven-year, $105 million offer to Kevin Brown, whose single season in San Diego had resulted in a third-place finish in the NL Cy Young voting and a World Series appearance. The deal even included 12 roundtrip charter flights from Georgia to L.A. so that Brown's family could travel to watch him pitch.

This was baseball's first nine-figure deal, and, though Brown did have two seasons in which he got some down-ballot Cy Young support in L.A., it is generally regarded as the first nine-figure bust. Brown was traded to the Yankees five years and one day later, after posting a 2.83 ERA in 137 appearances for the Dodgers, none of which occurred in the postseason.

1992: Bonds yield
When the Winter Meetings came to Louisville, Ky., a free-agent derby (appropriate to the location) broke out. There were north of 30 pacts that week, including the five-year, $28 million deal that wooed future Hall of Famer Greg Maddux, who was fresh off his first of four consecutive NL Cy Young Awards, from Chicago to Atlanta with the richest pitching contract in history to that point.

That Maddux deal was pretty big, but the biggest deal at the epic '92 Meetings was signed by one Barry Lamar Bonds with the Giants. You know all about the records Bonds would go on to break during his time in San Francisco, but at the Winter Meetings the only record that mattered was the one Bonds set with a $43 million commitment spread over six years (he was even the first player to negotiate a hotel suite on the road). That paycheck might look paltry by today's blockbuster standards, but it was a huge investment at the time for a Giants team that had just survived the threat of a move to Tampa., Fla., when a local group of investors stepped up to keep the team by the Bay. The Giants would eventually get a new ballpark, where Bonds hit No. 756 in 2007.

1988: Express delivery
The Rangers really went for it at the Winter Meetings in Atlanta, making three trades in the first three days of the event, including bringing in Julio Franco and Rafael Palmeiro. But their biggest score was 41-year-old Nolan Ryan, who was already the game's all-time strikeout king and had five no-hitters under his belt. The Rangers' one-year, $1.8 million guarantee to Ryan was actually less than what he was offered by the Giants and Angels, but the deal kept him in the state of Texas after nine seasons in Houston and began the final chapter of his legendary career.

Ryan would go on to pitch five more seasons with two more no-hitters for the Rangers, though the club's Winter Meetings aggression did not lead it to October.

1980: Narrowing down the (Win)field
By the end of the 1980 season, Dave Winfield was fed up with the Padres, and the feeling was mutual. He embarked upon a free agency the likes of which the game had not yet seen -- one that would set a template for countless other blockbuster deals to come. Winfield had many suitors that winter, including both New York clubs. The Mets were the team that pushed bidding up to $1.5 million per year (a staggering sum at the time), but Winfield was leery about their lack of lineup protection.

So Mets GM Frank Cashen spent the week of the Meetings trying to make a trade for Fred Lynn and others, to no avail. Winfield's camp also had serious negotiations with the Indians that week. But one day after the Meetings wrapped, it was the Yankees who landed him with a record-shattering, 10-year, $16 million deal -- one that would grow quite contentious and lead to a major public feud between Winfield and owner George Steinbrenner because of cost-of-living escalators that actually pushed the value closer to $23 million.

Anthony Castrovince has been a reporter for MLB.com since 2004. Read his columns, listen to his podcast and follow him on Twitter at @Castrovince.

10 biggest trades in Mariners history

MLB.com

SEATTLE -- Trades, trades, trades. Jerry Dipoto loves to make 'em. Fans love to suggest 'em. We'll try to rank 'em.

Here are the 10 biggest trades in Mariners history:

SEATTLE -- Trades, trades, trades. Jerry Dipoto loves to make 'em. Fans love to suggest 'em. We'll try to rank 'em.

Here are the 10 biggest trades in Mariners history:

1. Bringing in the Big Unit
Mariners got from Expos: LHP Randy Johnson, RHP Gene Harris, RHP Brian Holman
Mariners gave up: LHP Mark Langston, RHP Mike Campbell
Date: May 25, 1989

The Mariners didn't know quite what they were getting when general manager Woody Woodward dealt All-Star southpaw and staff ace Langston and a player to be named (Campbell) to Montreal for a trio of pitchers, but it turned out to be a heist as a lanky 25-year-old with 11 Major League games and a 4.69 ERA on his resume turned into one of the greatest pitchers in Mariners -- and MLB -- history. The Hall of Fame lefty wound up going 130-74 with a 3.42 ERA, earning five All-Star berths and a Cy Young Award in 10 seasons in Seattle. Holman was a solid three-year starter for the Mariners and Harris pitched four seasons out of the bullpen, but the Big Unit clearly turned into the prize in a deal where the Mariners gave up just four months of Langston, who went 12-9 with a 2.39 ERA in 24 starts for the Expos before becoming a free agent.

Video: The Rundown looks back on Randy Johnson's no-hitter

2. Sending away the Kid
Mariners got from Reds: CF Mike Cameron, RHP Brett Tomko, INF Antonio Perez, RHP Jake Meyer
Mariners gave up: CF Ken Griffey Jr.
Date: Feb. 10, 2000

In a deal that rocked Mariners fans, new GM Pat Gillick got what he could from the Reds after Griffey made it clear he wanted out after 11 seasons in Seattle. And considering Griffey controlled where he could be shipped, thanks to his 10-5 rights, Gillick wound up getting a pretty good return for the best player in franchise history. Cameron wound up being a popular replacement in center, winning a pair of Gold Gloves and an All-Star berth in four seasons in Seattle and playing a key role on the 116-win club in 2001. Tomko pitched two seasons for the Mariners, while the other two never made the big league club. Griffey, of course, eventually wound up returning to Seattle for two final seasons before retiring.

Video: Griffey becomes the first Mariner to win MVP in 1997

3. Big Apple blockbuster
Mariners got from Mets: OF Jay Bruce, RHP Anthony Swarzak, RHP Gerson Bautista, OF Jarred Kelenic, RHP Justin Dunn
Mariners gave up: 2B Robinson Cano, RHP Edwin Diaz
Date: Dec. 3, 2018

Tough to top this one in terms of star power, given Dipoto dealt one of the game's premier players in Cano and a closer in Diaz who was coming off a near-MLB record 57-save season in an effort to gain youth and financial flexibility going forward. Cano still had five years and $120 million remaining on his original 10-year contract, but the eight-time All-Star was 36 years old and didn't fit in Dipoto's rebuilding plans. Bruce was a three-time All-Star himself, but the real prizes for the Mariners were highly regarded prospects Kelenic and Dunn, both first-round Draft picks in 2016 and '18, respectively.

Video: Dipoto on the prospects acquired from Mets for Diaz

4. Age didn't matter
Mariners got from Red Sox: LHP Jamie Moyer
Mariners gave up: OF Darren Bragg
Date: July 30, 1996

Another gem for Woodward, whose midseason pickup of a much-traveled 33-year-old Moyer turned into 11 years of misery for opposing teams as the soft-tossing lefty went 145-87 with a 3.97 ERA in 324 games. Moyer had a pair of 20-plus-win seasons for Seattle and held the club record for wins until eventually being surpassed by Felix Hernandez more than a decade later. Bragg was a solid outfielder for 2 1/2 seasons for Boston, but Moyer became a Mariners Hall of Famer.

Video: Jamie Moyer excited to join Mariners Hall of Fame

5. Big haul for the Big Unit
Mariners got from Astros: RHP Freddy Garcia, SS Carlos Guillen, LHP John Halama
Mariners gave up: LHP Randy Johnson
Date: July 31, 1998

Johnson not only was a coup for Woodward when he was acquired, he wound up paying off again on his way out as the Mariners acquired three young players who became key components in their playoff teams in 2000 and 2001 in exchange for two months of Johnson before he hit free agency. Garcia was a two-time All-Star and went 76-50 in six seasons for Seattle, while Halama went 41-31 in four seasons and Guillen spent the first six years of a solid 14-year MLB career with the Mariners.

Video: Big Unit records his 300th K of the 1993 season

6. Good to the Bone
Mariners got from Yankees: OF Jay Buhner, RHP Rick Balabon
Mariners gave up: DH Ken Phelps, RHP Troy Evers
Date: July 21, 1988

Buhner was a well-regarded 23-year-old prospect with the Yankees who'd hit 31 homers the previous season in Triple-A, but they gave him up for the more-established bat of Phelps. Bad move for George Steinbrenner, who eventually wound up getting roasted in a Seinfeld episode for the lopsided deal as Buhner became a Mariners Hall of Famer with an outstanding 13-plus-year career in Seattle, while Phelps played just two mediocre seasons in the Bronx before being traded to the A's for Minor Leaguer Scott Holcomb.

Video: ANA@SEA: Buhner's 40th gives Mariners 258 homers

7. Quite a catch
Mariners got from Reds: C Dan Wilson, RHP Bobby Ayala
Mariners gave up: 2B Bret Boone, RHP Erik Hanson
Date: Nov. 2, 1993

Woodward gave up a young Boone -- who later returned to Seattle for his prime years -- and a quality pitcher in Hanson in his final year before free agency, and landed a franchise institution in Wilson in return. Wilson wound up catching 12 seasons in Seattle and was a key member of all four of their playoff clubs in that run, eventually becoming a Mariners Hall of Famer and an integral part of the community. Ayala wound up as an oft-criticized closer, but he did save 56 games for Seattle and pitched in 292 games over five seasons.

Video: Big Unit, Wilson headed to Mariners Hall of Fame

8. All-Star return for Dipoto
Mariners got from D-backs: OF Mitch Haniger, SS Jean Segura, LHP Zac Curtis
Mariners gave up: RHP Taijuan Walker, SS Ketel Marte
Date: Nov. 23, 2016

Dipoto quickly showed his willingness to wheel and deal, but his most significant trade in his initial seasons in Seattle came when he acquired Haniger and Segura, who both became American League All-Stars in their second years with the Mariners.

Video: MLB@JPN: Haniger extends lead with an RBI single

9. Quantity counts for something
Mariners got from Mets: LHP Jason Vargas, RHP Aaron Heilman, OF Endy Chavez, 1B Mike Carp, OF Ezequiel Carrera, RHP Maikel Cleto
Mariners got from Indians: CF Franklin Gutierrez
Mariners gave up to the Mets: RHP J.J. Putz, RHP Sean Green, OF Jeremy Reed
Mariners gave up to the Indians: INF Luis Valbuena
Date: Dec. 11, 2008

GM Jack Zduriencik wasted no time making a blockbuster at his first Winter Meetings, pulling off a three-team, 12-player deal that landed some pretty key players for Seattle. Gutierrez wound up playing seven seasons in the outfield for the Mariners, Vargas was a solid piece in the rotation for four years and Chavez and Carp saw some playing time as well. While Putz had been an All-Star closer for the Mariners, he struggled in one season for the Mets before becoming a free agent.

Video: BOS@SEA: Vargas flashes the leather to nab Ellsbury

10. A short-term coup
Mariners got from Phillies: LHP Cliff Lee
Mariners gave up: RHP Phillippe Aumont, RHP J.C. Ramirez, CF Tyson Gillies
Date: Dec. 16, 2009

Zduriencik made an outstanding deal to land Lee -- one of the game's top lefties -- for three Minor Leaguers who never made a dent with the Phillies. Lee was available because he was entering his final season before free agency, and he went 8-3 with a 2.34 ERA in 13 starts before the Mariners flipped him to the Rangers along with reliever Mark Lowe in July for first baseman Justin Smoak, right-handers Blake Beavan and Josh Lueke and infielder Matt Lawson. That haul didn't turn out as well as hoped, but Lee was a rental player and the Mariners really didn't give up much to get him in the first place.

Video: SEA@SD: Lee throws seven solid frames

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners

Biggest trades in Mets history

MLB.com

In their dealings with rival teams, the Mets have never lacked for drama. Some of the foremost stars have come and gone via trade, leaving the Mets with a history full of colorful transactions. Some worked. Some didn't. In both cases, the deals have often been memorable.

Here's a look at the 11 biggest trades in franchise history:

In their dealings with rival teams, the Mets have never lacked for drama. Some of the foremost stars have come and gone via trade, leaving the Mets with a history full of colorful transactions. Some worked. Some didn't. In both cases, the deals have often been memorable.

Here's a look at the 11 biggest trades in franchise history:

1. Mets land a big Fish
Mets received from Marlins: C Mike Piazza
Mets gave up: OF Preston Wilson, LHP Ed Yarnall, LHP Geoff Goetz
Date: May 22, 1998

Eight days after the Marlins acquired Piazza -- a former National League Rookie of the Year and five-time All-Star -- in a trade with the Dodgers, they spun him to the Mets for a trio of prospects. The only one of the bunch with any big league experience, Wilson, went on to make an All-Star team of his own, though by that point he had already moved on from Miami to Colorado. Yarnall appeared in just seven career big league games, none with the Marlins, while Goetz never cracked the Majors. Then there was Piazza, who launched the Mets back to relevance, led them to the 2000 World Series, delivered seven more All-Star seasons and went into the Hall of Fame with a Mets cap on his plaque.

Video: NYM@ATL: Keith Hernandez singles for the cycle

2. Captain incoming, Part 1
Mets received from Cardinals: 1B Keith Hernandez
Mets gave up: RHP Neil Allen, RHP Rick Ownbey
Date: June 15, 1983

The Mets were floundering in the early 1980s when they took advantage of Hernandez's contract situation (and often-stated sour relationship with Cardinals manager Whitey Herzog) to acquire a star in his prime. Already a five-time Gold Glove winner at the time of the trade, Hernandez instantly became part of the Mets' backbone, finishing second in NL MVP voting his first full season in Flushing. In 1986, Hernandez led the Mets to their second World Series title, and they returned the favor by naming him captain the following year. Meanwhile, neither Allen nor Ownbey distinguished themselves much in St. Louis, though the former at least remained in the big leagues for 11 seasons.

3. Captain incoming, Part 2
Mets received from Expos: C Gary Carter
Mets gave up: OF/IF Hubie Brooks, C Mike Fitzgerald, OF Herm Winningham, RHP Floyd Youmans
Date: Dec. 10, 1984

The acquisition of Hernandez made the Mets relevant, but it was the trade for Carter 18 months later that transformed them into a title-bound team. One of the foremost Winter Meetings blockbusters in baseball history, the deal filled a significant hole in New York's lineup. Carter became everything the Mets hoped he would be, clubbing 56 homers his first two seasons in Flushing plus another two in the 1986 World Series. He was named co-captain with Hernandez in 1988 and went into Cooperstown 15 years later (though with an Expos cap on his plaque). The most distinguished of the players the Mets gave up was Brooks, who posted one All-Star season in Montreal but never had the type of impact that Carter did in New York.

Video: Mets Retired Number: No. 41, Tom Seaver

4. Midnight massacre
Mets received from Reds: RHP Pat Zachry, INF Doug Flynn, OF Steve Henderson, OF Dan Norman
Mets gave up: RHP Tom Seaver
Date: June 15, 1977

Rather than acquiesce to Seaver's demands for a new contract, the Mets shipped their most popular player, and a key part of their 1969 World Series team, to the Reds for four players. At 32, Seaver was a former Rookie of the Year, a three-time Cy Young Award winner and a nine-time All-Star. He was the soul of the Mets and his departure remains, to this day, the most unpopular move in team history. Though Zachry, Henderson and Flynn all made marks on the franchise, none could compare to The Franchise himself, who enjoyed 5 1/2 seasons of success in Cincinnati before returning to the Mets in 1983. By that point, Seaver was 38, near the end of a brilliant Hall of Fame career.

5. So long, Cy
Mets received from Blue Jays: RHP Noah Syndergaard, C Travis d'Arnaud, C John Buck, OF Wuilmer Becerra
Mets gave up: RHP R.A. Dickey, C Josh Thole, C Mike Nickeas
Date: Dec. 17, 2012

There are few better examples of selling high than the Mets' trade of Dickey, who won the NL Cy Young Award in November 2012 and was traded a month later. Although Dickey proved plenty serviceable for the Blue Jays over the next four seasons, averaging over 200 innings with a 4.05 ERA, he never approached the level of dominance he reached with the Mets. In return, the Mets received a potential franchise catcher in d'Arnaud and a hard-throwing 20-year-old named Syndergaard. d'Arnaud never developed into the perennial All-Star the Mets were hoping for, but he nonetheless played a key role in their 2015 World Series run. Syndergaard, meanwhile, made an lasting impact, winning Game 3 of the 2015 Fall Classic and earning a spot atop the rotation in the seasons that followed.

Video: Must C Clutch: Cespedes clutch with his bat and arm

6. A Cespedes for the rest of us
Mets received from Tigers: OF Yoenis Cespedes
Mets gave up: RHP Michael Fulmer, RHP Luis Cessa
Date: July 31, 2015

Ostensibly a contender but featuring one of the Majors' worst offenses, the Mets made their biggest splash in years when they acquired Cespedes minutes before the 2015 non-waiver Trade Deadline. Over the final two months of that season, the Mets leaned on Cespedes, who hit 17 homers in 57 games -- including nine over a 13-game stretch that effectively wrapped up the NL East title in early September. After the season, Cespedes inked a one-year extension, then subsequently signed on for four more years the next winter. The deal was also far from a bust for the Tigers, as Fulmer won the 2016 American League Rookie of the Year Award and was an All-Star in '17.

7. Ryan Express leaves the station
Mets received from Angels: SS Jim Fregosi
Mets gave up: RHP Nolan Ryan, OF Leroy Stanton, RHP Don Rose, C Frank Estrada
Date: Dec. 10, 1971

Unable to match the magic of 1969 in either of the next two seasons, the Mets mortgaged a significant chunk of their future to acquire Fregosi, a six-time All-Star. While Ryan's hard-throwing talent was obvious to the Mets during his first five big league seasons, his control issues frustrated them. Almost immediately, Ryan proved his old team's worries were unfounded, dropping his ERA from 3.97 to 2.28 during his first year in Anaheim. He went on to complete a Hall of Fame career with the Angels, Astros and Rangers, retiring with a Major League record 5,714 strikeouts that still stands.

Video: STL@NYM: Santana fans Freese to complete no-hitter

8. Mets land an ace
Mets received from Twins: LHP Johan Santana
Mets gave up: OF Carlos Gomez, RHP Philip Humber, RHP Kevin Mulvey, RHP Deolis Guerra
Date: Feb. 2, 2008

With most of the nucleus back from stacked 2006 and '07 teams, the Mets believed Santana was the piece they needed to reach the World Series. One of his generation's best pitchers, Santana signed a six-year, $137.5 million contract after the Mets agreed to trade for him, then delivered one of his best seasons in 2008. But it wasn't enough for the Mets, who collapsed again down the stretch in '08 and fell out of contention much earlier in '09. Santana missed all of '11 due to injury, returned to throw the first no-hitter in franchise history in '12, then went down for good two months later. The second-most prominent player in the deal was Gomez, whose best years came after the Twins traded him to the Brewers in '09. Humber made only 13 appearances in two years with the Twins and retired with a 5.31 ERA over a modest eight-year career, but the righty threw the 21st perfect game in Major League history, retiring 27 straight Mariners while with the White Sox on April 21, 2012.

9. An Amazin' trade
Mets received from Expos: 1B Donn Clendenon
Mets gave up: RHP Steve Renko, INF Kevin Collins, RHP Jay Carden, RHP David Colon, 3B Terry Dailey
Date: June 15, 1969

Seeking a veteran for his team's surprising playoff push, Mets manager Gil Hodges settled on Clendenon -- a solid but unspectacular first baseman over eight seasons in Pittsburgh. In a new uniform, Clendenon became dynamic down the stretch, hitting 12 home runs in 72 games. After sitting out the NL Championship Series, Clendenon earned World Series MVP honors with a .357 average, three homers and a 1.071 OPS in four games. In exchange for that spark, the Mets gave up Renko, who played 15 years in the big leagues; Collins, who retired after the 1971 campaign; and three others who never cracked the Majors.

Video: Cano, Diaz introduced by Van Wagenen as newest Mets

10. Van Wagenen makes his mark
Mets received from Mariners: 2B Robinson Cano, RHP Edwin Diaz
Mets gave up: OF Jay Bruce, RHP Anthony Swarzak, RHP Gerson Bautista, OF Jarred Kelenic, RHP Justin Dunn
Date: Dec. 3, 2018

New GM Brodie Van Wagenen made good on his promise to rejuvenate the Mets' roster in the first trade of his tenure, completing a seven-player blockbuster barely a month after joining the front office, affirming a win-now mode for the franchise. For the Mets, the prize was Diaz, who was coming off a franchise-record 57-save season and was under team control through 2022. A five-time Silver Slugger, Cano waived his no-trade clause to return to New York, his home from 2005-13 with the Yankees, but he arrived with a potentially burdensome contract that runs through his age-40 season. In exhange, the Mets unloaded the contracts of Bruce and Swarzak as well as a high-ceiling prospect package featuring their 2018 No. 1 pick in Kelenic, a top pitching prospect in Dunn and Bautista, a fireballing reliever. 

11. An error in judgment
Mets received from Rays: RHP Victor Zambrano, RHP Bartolome Fortunato
Mets gave up: LHP Scott Kazmir, RHP Jose Diaz
Date: July 30, 2004

Assailed by many at the time, the Mets' trade of Kazmir -- a dynamic young left-handed pitching prospect -- for Zambrano looks even worse in retrospect. Pitching coach Rick Peterson's reported proclamation that he could fix Zambrano in 10 minutes never came true, with arm trouble limiting Zambrano to just 39 games over three seasons in New York. Kazmir, meanwhile, made good on much of his potential, making two All-Star teams and winning 108 games over 12 big league seasons.

Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo, Instagram and Facebook.

New York Mets

10 biggest trades in D-backs history

MLB.com

Some trades turn out great. Others look good at the time, yet turn out poorly. And some, like No. 7 on this list, look bad when they're made and get worse with time.

Here's a look at the 10 biggest trades in D-backs history:

Some trades turn out great. Others look good at the time, yet turn out poorly. And some, like No. 7 on this list, look bad when they're made and get worse with time.

Here's a look at the 10 biggest trades in D-backs history:

1. Going Gonzo
D-backs got from Tigers: OF Luis Gonzalez
D-backs gave up: OF Karim Garcia
Date: Dec. 28, 1998

Garcia was a hot young prospect that the D-backs had selected in the Expansion Draft in 1997, while Gonzalez was a 31-year-old veteran in the middle of a solid if not spectacular career. Gonzalez led the National League in hits in 1999, helping the D-backs win 100 games in the franchise's second season. Then, in 2001, he hit 57 homers and delivered the game-winning hit in Game 7 of the World Series off Yankees closer Mariano Rivera.

Video: Greatest World Series Moments: No. 10

2. Schilling for Lee
D-backs got from Phillies: RHP Curt Schilling
D-backs gave up: 1B Travis Lee, LHP Omar Daal, RHP Nelson Figueroa, RHP Vicente Padilla
Date: July 26, 2000

The D-backs were hoping that acquiring Schilling before the Trade Deadline would help them repeat as NL West champs, but the team struggled down the stretch and missed the postseason. The trade, though, paid big dividends the next two years as Schilling won 22 games in 2001 and 23 in 2002. Schilling shared 2001 World Series MVP honors with Randy Johnson and won 58 of his 107 starts in Arizona.

Video: D-backs get Schilling in their best in-season trade

3. Dan Haren trade, pt. 2
D-backs got from Angels: LHP Patrick Corbin, LHP Tyler Skaggs, RHP Rafael Rodriguez, LHP Joe Saunders
D-backs gave up: RHP Dan Haren
Date: July 25, 2010

Interim GM Jerry Dipoto reaped quite a haul in trading Haren, while at the same time saving the money left on the right-hander's contract. With the D-backs mired in last place, the deal helped accelerate their rebuilding plans. Corbin would go on to make two All-Star appearances for the D-backs and become a rotation mainstay, while Saunders played a pivotal role on the 2011 team that won the NL West. Skaggs was eventually dealt by the D-backs a couple of years later.

Video: ARI@SF: Corbin K's 9 over 7 strong against Giants

4. Upton moving on
D-backs got from Braves: SS Nick Ahmed, RHP Randall Delgado, INF Martin Prado, INF Brandon Drury, RHP Zeke Spruill
D-backs gave up: OF Justin Upton, INF Chris Johnson
Date: Jan. 24, 2013

This is a deal that still splits the D-backs fan base. Upton was the No. 1 overall pick in the 2005 Draft and looked to be a fixture in Arizona after signing an early lucrative contract extension. General manager Kevin Towers soured on Upton, however, and made no secret of the fact that he was shopping him following the 2012 season. That led to a rupture in the relationship, and by the end of it all, the team felt as though it had to make a deal. Prado was average for the D-backs, while Delgado never lived up to his billing as a top-end starter, and Drury was dealt to the Yankees prior to 2018. Ahmed, however, became a Gold Glove starter at short for the team.

Video: MLB Network breaks down trade between Braves, D-backs

5. Ice Man acquired
D-backs got from Marlins: RHP Matt Mantei
D-backs gave up: RHP Vladimir Nunez, RHP Brad Penny, OF Abraham Nunez
Date: July 8, 1999

The D-backs surprisingly led the NL West in June of '99 before slipping into second place as the calendar flipped to July, and there were fears they would fall further without a closer. GM Joe Garagiola Jr. wasted little time acquiring Mantei, who saved 22 games for Arizona and was a big reason the D-backs won 100 games and the division title. Injuries would limit Mantei after that, but he did manage to pitch for the D-backs for six seasons. Of the prospects dealt to the Marlins, only Penny would make a big impact in the big leagues.

Video: ARI@LAD: D-backs win 2001 season opener

6. Missing out on Scherzer
D-backs got from Tigers: RHP Edwin Jackson
D-backs got from Yankees: RHP Ian Kennedy
D-backs gave up: RHP Max Scherzer, LHP Daniel Schlereth
Date: Dec. 8, 2009

Concerned about Scherzer's durability given his violent delivery, the D-backs, who needed additional pitching, dealt him in order to acquire Kennedy and Jackson. The deal paid off in the short term for the D-backs as Kennedy went 21-4 in 2011 to help the D-backs win the NL West. Jackson tossed a no-hitter for the team in 2010 and was used later that year to acquire Daniel Hudson, another key contributor in 2011. Scherzer, however, is building a case for the Hall of Fame.

Video: D'backs Dugout: Max Scherzer with Daron Sutton

7. Shelby Miller deal
D-backs got from Braves: RHP Shelby Miller, LHP Gabe Speier
D-backs gave up: RHP Aaron Blair, OF Ender Inciarte, SS Dansby Swanson
Date: Dec. 9, 2015

Having already spent $206.5 million to sign Zack Greinke a week earlier, the D-backs went all in for 2016 and acquired Miller. The trade, which was heavily criticized at the time, has been a disaster for the D-backs. Miller struggled so much in 2016 that he was demoted to the Minors at one point and then, after a promising start to 2017, he needed Tommy John surgery. Inciarte, meanwhile, has become a key cog for the Braves and Swanson, the No. 1 overall pick in the 2015 Draft, is now an established everyday shortstop.

Video: D-backs get Miller from Braves in blockbuster deal

8. Dan Haren trade, pt. 1
D-backs got from A's: RHP Dan Haren, RHP Connor Robertson
D-backs gave up: LHP Brett Anderson, 1B Chris Carter, OF Aaron Cunningham, LHP Dana Eveland, OF Carlos Gonzalez, LHP Greg Smith
Date: Dec. 14, 2007

The D-backs won the NL West in 2007 and believed they had the core of a championship team in place. In order to put them over the top, GM Josh Byrnes acquired Haren to pair with Brandon Webb at the top of the rotation. The D-backs parted with a lot of talent in the deal, with Gonzalez having the biggest impact, and that doesn't even take into account that Arizona had to deal outfielder Carlos Quentin to the White Sox to get Carter, who the A's wanted in the deal. While the D-backs would not win the division in 2008 thanks to a Manny Ramirez-led mid-season surge by the Dodgers, Haren did pitch well for the D-backs and ended up bringing a good return in 2010.

Video: STL@ARI: Haren fans nine over eight frames

9. Big Unit to the Big Apple
D-backs got from Yankees: LHP Brad Halsey, C Dioner Navarro, RHP Javier Vazquez and cash
D-backs gave up: LHP Randy Johnson
Date: Jan. 11, 2005

Johnson wanted to be traded following the 2004 season, and the D-backs accommodated him, hoping that Vazquez could be a top of the rotation type of starter and betting on the upside with Halsey. Vazquez lasted just one year with the D-backs, but upon being traded to the White Sox, he was able to net Arizona Chris Young, who manned center field on some good D-backs teams. Halsey did not develop as hoped, and the team would eventually acquire Johnson back from the Yankees.

Video: WS2001 Gm6: Big Unit strikes out 7 against Yankees

10. Trumbo trade
D-backs got from Angels: OF Mark Trumbo, RHP A.J. Schugel
D-backs got from White Sox: OF Brandon Jacobs
D-backs gave up: LHP Tyler Skaggs, OF Adam Eaton
Date: Dec. 10, 2013

After finishing at .500 in 2012, the D-backs were desperate to add more power to their lineup. They wound up paying a heavy price to do it. Though injury issues hampered Skaggs early in his career with the Angels, he became a rotation regular. Meanwhile, Eaton became one of the game's top outfielders. At the time, the D-backs were playing Eaton at center and had A.J. Pollock coming up. Rather than shift Eaton to one of the corners, they paid a heavy price for a year and half of Trumbo.

Video: Trumbo on joining D-backs, new-look lineup

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks

Most stunning offseason trades in MLB history

MLB.com

Every Hot Stove season comes with the potential of blockbuster deals, whether by free agency or trade. But there have been some offseason trades throughout baseball history that have particularly stunned us, catching us by surprise and creating exciting storylines for the upcoming season.

Here's a look at 10 of the most stunning offseason trades in MLB history.

Every Hot Stove season comes with the potential of blockbuster deals, whether by free agency or trade. But there have been some offseason trades throughout baseball history that have particularly stunned us, catching us by surprise and creating exciting storylines for the upcoming season.

Here's a look at 10 of the most stunning offseason trades in MLB history.

Dec. 3, 2018: Mets trade Jay Bruce, Anthony Swarzak, Gerson Bautista, Justin Dunn and Jarred Kelenic to Mariners for Robinson Cano and Edwin Diaz
The Mariners decided to rebuild after an 89-win season, as general manager Jerry Dipoto determined his roster was not strong enough to compete with American League powerhouses including the Red Sox, Yankees and Astros. Meanwhile, new Mets general manager Brodie Van Wagenen sought impact additions as he inherited a club coming off a disappointing 77-win campaign. 

At the center of it all was Cano's massive contract, in which he was still owed $120 million over the remaining half of the 10-year deal he originally signed with Seattle prior to 2014. Cano was also coming off an 80-game suspension after he tested positive for a banned substance, further complicating his future in Seattle. Looking to clear up payroll space for his retooling efforts, Dipoto packaged Cano and Diaz -- the closer coming off a franchise-record 57-save season -- to New York in a deal that netted him both salary relief and a pair of top prospects in the right-hander Dunn and the outfielder Kelenic. 

Video: Mets acquire Cano, Diaz in 7-player trade

Dec. 9, 2015: D-backs trade Dansby Swanson, Ender Inciarte and Aaron Blair to Braves for Shelby Miller
Miller was an All-Star with the Braves in 2015, as the 24-year-old right-hander posted a 3.02 ERA in 33 starts and looked to have a bright future ahead of him. But the D-backs made an overwhelming offer, sending Swanson -- the first overall pick in the '15 Draft -- along with speedy center fielder Inciarte and right-hander Blair to Atlanta.

"We wanted to make it painful for [the D-backs] with players that we got back," Braves president of baseball operations John Hart said at the time. "They are players that we think are going to be a big part of our future."

Video: D-backs get Miller from Braves in blockbuster deal

Swanson was the No. 10 prospect in baseball at the time, according to MLB Pipeline. Inciarte was coming off a solid second year in the Majors, hitting .303/.338/.408 with 21 steals for Arizona, while playing a stellar center field with 29 defensive runs saved. Both played key roles in helping the Braves win the National League East last season.

Meanwhile, Miller has been beset with injuries since being traded to Arizona, and when he has been on the mound, he's struggled. In 29 appearances (28 starts) over three seasons with the D-backs, he has a 6.35 ERA. He's only made nine starts since '16.

Nov. 20, 2013: Tigers trade Prince Fielder to Rangers for Ian Kinsler
This deal was a stunner because Fielder, at age 29, had missed just one game in five years, and in two seasons with the Tigers had slashed .295/.387/.491 with 55 home runs. Nevertheless, Detroit dealt him to Texas in what proved to be a good move; Fielder would only have one more full season remaining in his career, with chronic neck injuries leading to his retirement at age 32.

Kinsler was an All-Star in his first season with Detroit, and was productive in his first three years as a Tiger, combining to hit .286/.332/.443 with 56 homers and 39 steals. He missed some time in 2017 due to a hamstring injury, and hit .236/.313/.412 with 22 homers in 139 games. He was traded to the Angels prior to the '18 season, and was traded to the Red Sox last July.

Video: Jason Beck on reaction to the Prince Fielder trade

Nov. 19, 2012: Marlins trade Mark Buehrle, Jose Reyes, Josh Johnson, Emilio Bonifacio and John Buck to Blue Jays for eight players
The Marlins made a big splash on the free agent market following the 2011 season, as they prepared to open Marlins Park the next spring. Miami spent a combined $191 million to sign free agents Buehrle, Reyes and closer Heath Bell. It appeared the franchise was remaking itself, adding those established stars to a club that already featured slugger Giancarlo Stanton. But after a 69-93 season in '12, the Marlins traded Buehrle, Reyes and three other players to Toronto for eight players: Henderson Alvarez, Anthony DeSclafani, Yunel Escobar, Adeiny Hechavarria, Jake Marisnick, Jeff Mathis and Justin Nicolino.

The move represented a stunning reversal for Miami, from a big-spending offseason to build a competitive club, to trading some of their highest-paid players away for young talent. The Marlins have had little success on the field since, finishing no higher than third place in five of six seasons, with a losing record in each one.

Video: Rosenthal breaks down potential blockbuster trade

Jan. 21, 2011: Blue Jays trade Vernon Wells to Angels for Mike Napoli and Juan Rivera
Wells had suffered a series of injuries but bounced back for a strong season in 2010, compiling a 125 OPS+ while hitting 31 homers and driving in 88 runs. The Angels were desperate for an impact bat after missing out on several bids in the free-agent market including Carl Crawford and Adrian Beltre, and ownership issued a directive to bring Wells west. 

Wells, a homegrown star with Toronto, was thought to be untradeable -- until he was sent to Anaheim along with $5 million in cash for the powerful Napoli and the veteran outfielder Rivera. Part of the motivation was financial; Wells was due for a raise of nearly $11 million in 2011. But more injuries ultimately prevented Wells from living up to his contract, as he hit just .218 in his debut season with the Halos and played just one more half-season in Anaheim before he was traded again to the Yankees. Wells was out of the Majors within three years of this deal. 

Feb. 16, 2004: Rangers trade Alex Rodriguez to Yankees for Alfonso Soriano
This move was stunning not because Rodriguez was moved, but because of which team he ended up with. For weeks, it appeared that Rodriguez was destined for the Red Sox, and Boston was coming off a heartbreaking loss to New York in the American League Championship Series the prior October. Red Sox general manager Theo Epstein and company had a deal in place with Texas, and needed approval from the MLB Players Association to finalize a revised contract for Rodriguez, which would involve him reducing the total amount of his existing $252 million contract, of which $179 million remained.

The MLBPA declined to approve the contract restructuring proposal. Throughout this process, the Yankees -- another club Rodriguez had on his list of preferred trade destinations -- did not show interest in acquiring the superstar shortstop, because New York already had Derek Jeter at short, and ALCS walk-off hero Aaron Boone at third base. But after the Rangers-Red Sox deal was nixed, Boone hurt his knee playing a pick-up basketball game, opening a window for Rodriguez in the Bronx. The Yankees signed him, but while it appeared at the time that New York had once again gotten the better of Boston, the Red Sox defeated the Yankees in that October's ALCS with an epic comeback after being down three games to none, going on to win their first World Series title in 86 years.

Feb. 18, 1999: Blue Jays trade Roger Clemens to Yankees for David Wells, Homer Bush and Graeme Lloyd
Clemens was coming off his second consecutive AL Cy Young season with Toronto, and fifth overall. The right-hander remained his dominant self in his age-35 season, and invoked a clause in his contract in which he was permitted to demand a trade. The Blue Jays tried to strike a deal with the Yankees in mid-December, but New York was unwilling to part with top prospects, and an agreement seemed unlikely.

But in a stunning turn of events, and after Clemens had retracted his trade demand, the two sides reached an agreement that didn't cost New York any top prospects. Instead, the Yankees sent David Wells and a pair of lower-level prospects to Toronto, landing The Rocket in one of the most significant transactions in franchise history.

Video: 2000 ALCS Gm4: Clemens fans 15 in a one-hit shutout

Clemens would end up being instrumental in New York's World Series championships in 1999 and 2000, the last of which marked a three-peat. Wells returned to the organization that originally drafted him in '82, and for whom he pitched the first six seasons of his Major League career. He spent two more seasons with the Blue Jays, posting a 4.47 ERA (111 ERA+), finishing third in AL Cy Young Award voting in 2000.

Dec. 10, 1984: Expos trade Gary Carter to Mets for Hubie Brooks, Mike Fitzgerald, Herm Winningham and Floyd Youmans
Carter was an institution in Canada, and one of the most popular players in Expos history. In 11 seasons with Montreal, he was a seven-time All-Star, won three Gold Glove Awards, and had slashed .272/.345/.461 with 215 home runs. He also hit .429 with four doubles and a pair of homers in Montreal's run to the NL Championship Series in 1981.

The move was stunning, but the Expos were looking to improve at multiple positions after a fifth-place finish in the NL East in '84. Carter would go on to play five seasons for the Mets, being selected to the NL All-Star team four times and finishing third in NL MVP voting in '86, the year he helped New York beat the Red Sox to win the World Series.

Video: Expos Retired Number: No. 8, Gary Carter

April 5, 1972: Expos trade Rusty Staub to Mets for Tim Foli, Mike Jorgensen and Ken Singleton
Staub was known affectionately as "Le Grand Orange," and became immensely popular in Montreal after being traded to the Expos by the Astros in 1969. He performed well on the field -- hitting .296/.404/.501 with 78 homers in three seasons, in each of which he was an All-Star -- and endeared himself to the fans by learning to speak French. 

"I felt I should be able to communicate with the people of Montreal in their own language," he told Sports Illustrated in '70. "After all, they were interested in baseball. I thought I should be interested enough in them to learn how to converse with them."

Video: Expos Retired Number: No. 10, Rusty Staub

The trade was a shock to the baseball community in Montreal, and Staub went on to spend four seasons with the Mets and four with the Tigers before Detroit traded him back to Montreal in '79. His second stint with the franchise was brief, however -- he only played 38 games for the Expos before being traded the following March to the Rangers.

Dec. 9, 1965: Reds trade Frank Robinson to Orioles for Jack Baldschun, Milt Pappas and Dick Simpson
Robinson was a tremendous talent, and had proven it with Cincinnati by hitting .303/.389/.554 with 324 home runs over 10 seasons with the club. He was the 1956 NL Rookie of the Year, and the '61 NL MVP. Yet Reds general manager Bill DeWitt said the future Hall of Famer had reached his peak by that point, and sent him to Baltimore following the '65 season. 

The centerpiece in the return for Robinson was Pappas, a two-time All-Star right-hander with a 3.24 ERA in nine seasons with the Orioles. He only spent two and a half seasons with Cincinnati, posting a 4.04 ERA in 82 appearances (75 starts) before being traded to the Braves in June of '68.

Video: Orioles Legends Series: Frank Robinson

Meanwhile, Robinson went on to put up even better numbers in six seasons with Baltimore, slashing .300/.401/.543 with 179 homers, becoming the first player to win the MVP Award in each league by doing so in his first AL season with the Orioles in '66. That year, he also won the Triple Crown and led Baltimore to a World Series championship. 

Manny Randhawa is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Follow him on Twitter at @MannyOnMLB.

The biggest Winter Meetings trades of all time

MLB.com

The Winter Meetings mark the most unpredictable days on the offseason calendar, and through the decades we've seen the tides of the game shift repeatedly with some massive trades.

Here is a look at some of the biggest swaps in Winter Meetings history, featuring a multitude of Hall of Famers and Hall of Famers-to-be:

The Winter Meetings mark the most unpredictable days on the offseason calendar, and through the decades we've seen the tides of the game shift repeatedly with some massive trades.

Here is a look at some of the biggest swaps in Winter Meetings history, featuring a multitude of Hall of Famers and Hall of Famers-to-be:

2016: Sale swaps his Sox
A day after rumors had the White Sox nearing a deal to send Sale to the Nationals, Chicago shipped him to Boston instead. The Red Sox, who already had David Price and 2016 AL Cy Young Award winner Rick Porcello, further solidified their rotation with a 27-year-old superstar under club control for three more seasons at a reasonable price. But they also had to reach into their highly touted farm system to do it.

For parting with Sale, the White Sox landed four of the Red Sox's top 30 prospects, according to MLB Pipeline: five-tool infielder Yoan Moncada (No. 1), hard-throwing right-hander Michael Kopech (No. 5), switch-hitting outfielder Luis Basabe (No. 8) and righty Victor Diaz (No. 28). Moncada, also the top overall prospect in baseball, got the highest bonus in history for an amateur player ($31.5 million) when Boston signed him in 2015, after he left Cuba.

2015: Historic trade for No. 1
Fresh off signing starter Zack Greinke to a six-year deal worth more than $200 million, the D-backs decided to commit fully to their newfound "win now" approach at the 2015 meetings in Nashville. The D-backs sent three players to the Braves, including shortstop prospect Dansby Swanson, who they had drafted No. 1 overall not six months prior, as well as 2016 Gold Glove-winning outfielder Ender Inciarte, for a package highlighted by All-Star starter Shelby Miller.

Swanson became the first top overall pick to be traded before reaching the Majors since Adrian Gonzalez in 2003, and the first ever to be dealt the year he was drafted. Early returns on the deal heavily favor the Braves, as Miller posted a 6.15 ERA in his first year in Arizona as the D-backs lost 93 games, while Swanson hit .302 in his brief debut while looking like the cornerstone of the Braves' rebuild.

Video: Bowman on Braves dealing for Swanson, Inciarte, Blair

2009: Three-team stunner
The D-backs, Tigers and Yankees pulled off the biggest three-team trade in Winter Meetings history in 2009 in Indianapolis. In a fairly uncommon occurrence, the deal actually benefitted each team involved in some way. The D-backs received Edwin Jackson and Ian Kennedy, the latter of whom played the role of ace during Arizona's 2011 National League West title run. The Yankees, meanwhile, hauled in Curtis Granderson, who would hit 115 homers in four seasons in the Bronx and earn a fourth-place AL MVP Award finish in '11.

Still, several years later, it's safe to say the Tigers probably won this deal. Detroit landed Max Scherzer and Austin Jackson (along with Daniel Schlereth and Phil Coke). Jackson was a very solid center fielder for five seasons in Detroit, but Scherzer ended up being the biggest difference maker. He established himself as one of the game's top pitchers, winning the 2013 AL Cy Young Award and averaging 241 strikeouts over his final three seasons with the Tigers. 

Video: Gilbert looks back on the Scherzer trade from 2009

2007: Miggy lands in Detroit
It's easy to think of Miguel Cabrera as the cornerstone of the Detroit Tigers, but he was a superstar well before he headed to the Motor City. In five seasons with the Marlins, Cabrera hit .313 with 138 homers and made the All-Star team four times.

Then, at the Opryland during the 2007 Winter Meetings, Dave Dombrowski swung one of the biggest deals of the past decade, sending six players, including Andrew Miller and Cameron Maybin, to the Marlins for Cabrera and Dontrelle Willis. The rest, of course, is history. Cabrera developed into arguably the best hitter of his generation, and he's signed with the Tigers through the 2023 season.

Video: WS2012 Gm3: Miggy receives trophy for Triple Crown

1990: Padres and Blue Jays pull off a blockbuster
According to The New York Times, then-Blue Jays general manager Pat Gillick called his wife Doris during the 1990 Winter Meetings, telling her he had just dealt Fred McGriff and Tony Fernandez to the Padres for Joe Carter and Roberto Alomar. Her response: "Will you get home before you screw up the team any further?"

Of course, with the benefit of hindsight, Pat made out just fine in the trade. Alomar went on to a Hall of Fame career, and Carter won the 1993 World Series with his famed walk-off home run in Game 6. Both played an integral role on Toronto's only two championship teams. San Diego, on the other hand, got a few very quality years out of McGriff and Fernandez.

Video: Must C Classic: Carter's walk-off HR wins 1993 WS

1984: Rickey lands in the Bronx
The 1984 Winter Meetings in Houston saw a future Hall of Famer in Rickey Henderson on the move. The Yankees sent Tim Birtsas, Jay Howell, Stan Javier, Eric Plunk and Jose Rijo to the A's in exchange for Henderson, who would swipe 326 bags and record 663 hits in five seasons for the Bombers.

Only Derek Jeter (358) has recorded more stolen bases in pinstripes, and he did so with the benefit of 2,151 more games than Henderson. The Yanks would eventually send Rickey back to Oakland in 1989, where he would break the all-time stolen-base record two years later.

Video: Rickey Henderson takes his talent to the Bronx

1984: Gary Carter to the Mets
Murray Cook's first task as general manager of the Montreal Expos was to trade beloved catcher Gary Carter -- an order that was given by Expos owner Charles Bronfman during the 1984 offseason. As the story goes, Cook and Mets executive Frank Cashen came to an agreement on the trade in a stairwell at the Opryland.

In exchange for Carter, New York gave up Hubie Brooks, Mike Fitzgerald, Herm Winningham and Floyd Youmans. Carter spent five seasons of his Hall of Fame career with the Mets, making the All-Star team four times and playing a pivotal role on the 1986 club that won the World Series.

Video: Carter's first home opener at Shea ends with homer

1980: Herzog rebuilds the Redbirds
Herzog had served as the Cardinals' interim manager for 73 games before he was promoted to the club's general manager in August 1980. That offseason, Herzog took the manager spot back from Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst, and then immediately made his mark in his front office role for St. Louis.

Herzog engineered three massive trades, featuring 23 total players, and wound up sending a dozen Cardinals players away. When the dust had cleared, Herzog had one elite reliever in Bruce Sutter but sent another, Rollie Fingers, to the Brewers alongside Ted Simmons and Pete Vuckovich. While Herzog sent away those three stars, his moves in 1980 set the groundwork for later deals that would bring Lonnie Smith, Ozzie Smith and other valuable pieces to a club that captured a pair of National League pennants in the 1980s. In fact, the Redbirds wound up defeating the Brewers in the World Series just two years later.

Video: MLB Productions recalls the 1982 World Series

1975: Bill Veeck is "Open for Business"
During the 1975 Winter Meetings in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., newly minted White Sox owner Veeck famously set up a table in the hotel lobby with a sign that read "Open for Business." He would then go on to make six trades involving 22 players, including Jim Kaat (to the Phillies), Clay Carroll (to the White Sox from the Reds), Ralph Garr (to the White Sox from the Braves) and Dick Ruthven (from the Phillies to the White Sox, then from the White Sox to the Braves).

The South Siders won 75 games during the 1975 season, so Veeck's approach made at least some sense. But the deals didn't pay off, and the White Sox finished last in the AL West in '76 with just 64 victories.

1965: Frank Robinson goes to Baltimore
Legendary baseball executive Lee MacPhail left the Baltimore Orioles after the 1965 season, but not before he set in motion a trade that would shape the course of baseball history. At the '65 Winter Meetings, MacPhail negotiated the deal with the Reds that sent Frank Robinson to the Orioles for Jack Baldschun, Milt Pappas and Dick Simpson.

Robinson would go on to win two World Series and the 1966 American League MVP Award in Baltimore. Before completing the deal, however, MacPhail first made sure to get the approval of Harry Dalton, the incoming general manager. Fortunately for O's fans, Dalton signed off.

Video: DET@BAL: Frank Robinson hits 500th home run

1959: Yankees acquire Roger Maris
The Kansas City Athletics' disappointing 1959 season culminated with the firing of manager Harry Craft. After being let go, Craft allegedly told Yankees skipper Casey Stengel to trade for A's youngster Roger Maris, because he was destined for stardom.

Video: BAL@NYY: Maris hits his 60th home run of 1961

Sure enough, at the Winter Meetings in Miami Beach, Fla., Stengel followed through, landing Maris in exchange for Don Larsen, Hank Bauer, Norm Siebern and Marv Throneberry (New York also received Joe DeMaestri and Kent Hadley). Two years later, Maris became baseball's single-season home run king, and he helped lead the Yanks to World Series appearances in each of the next five years -- including two titles.

AJ Cassavell is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

10 biggest trades in Nationals history

MLB.com

WASHINGTON -- The trade market has been one of the most effective tools used by Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo to build such a successful team. There have been many good trades, a few egregiously bad ones and many that significantly impacted franchise history.

Starting pitching and bullpen help have been the most frequent needs on Washington's shopping list, although an aggressive move to acquire an outfielder and a trade considered one of the biggest steals in recent memory also stand out. MLB.com looks at the 10 trades with the biggest impact in Nationals history:

WASHINGTON -- The trade market has been one of the most effective tools used by Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo to build such a successful team. There have been many good trades, a few egregiously bad ones and many that significantly impacted franchise history.

Starting pitching and bullpen help have been the most frequent needs on Washington's shopping list, although an aggressive move to acquire an outfielder and a trade considered one of the biggest steals in recent memory also stand out. MLB.com looks at the 10 trades with the biggest impact in Nationals history:

1. The Gio Gonzalez trade
Nats got from the A's: LHP Gio Gonzalez, RHP Robert Gilliam
Nats gave up: RHPs Brad Peacock and A.J. Cole, C Derek Norris, LHP Tommy Milone
Date: Dec. 23, 2011

Video: WSH@ATL: Gonzalez fans eight over seven strong

For about a year, the Nationals searched for another established starting pitcher and they ended up acquiring a lefty who would become one of the foundations of their rotation. Gonzalez lasted seven seasons in D.C., as he collected the fourth-most wins (86) in team history and started the Nats' first postseason game ever in 2012. He left with the fifth-most Wins Above Replacement (21.3) of any player in Nationals history.

2. Coming in for the steal
Nats got: SS Trea Turner, RHP Joe Ross
Padres got: 1B/OF Wil Myers
Rays got: OF Steven Souza Jr.
Date: Dec. 19, 2014

Video: WSH@COL: Turner rips a 2-run triple to right-center

Although this deal is not as lopsided as it once looked, many evaluators believe the Nationals made out like bandits in this three-team swap. There were several other Minor Leaguers involved, but these were the main pieces. The Nats, the third team added to the trade, received perhaps the most promising player in Turner -- currently their everyday shortstop, a true leadoff hitter and stolen-base threat -- as well as a capable starter in Joe Ross.

3. Badly needed relief
Nats got from the A's: LHP Sean Doolittle, RHP Ryan Madson
Nats gave up: RHP Blake Treinen, LHP Jesus Luzardo, INF Sheldon Neuse
Date: July 16, 2017

Video: WSH@NYM: Madson induces a double play to notch save

When this trade is reviewed a few years down the line, there's a chance the Nationals will have dealt away too much -- considering Treinen was an All-Star closer the next season and Luzardo is currently dominating in the Minors. But the 2017 Nationals were a legitimate World Series contender in the first half, with a bullpen that threatened to torpedo those chances if they did not fix it. Doolittle and Madson were instant successes as lockdown relievers late in games.

4. Diamond in the rough
Nats got from the Rangers: RHPs Tanner Roark and Ryan Tatusko
Nats gave up: INF Cristian Guzman
Date: July 30, 2010

Video: WSH@CHC: Roark tosses 7 2/3 innings, strikes out 7

This is perhaps the biggest steal of Rizzo's career, as he added a late bloomer in Roark -- who has been a major part of the Nats for the past six seasons -- in exchange for the final 15 games of Guzman's career. A 93-loss Washington team was looking to shed Guzman's contract at the Trade Deadline and ended up acquiring a fixture for its starting rotation.

5. Surprise aggression
Nats got from the White Sox: OF Adam Eaton
Nats gave up: RHPs Lucas Giolito, Dane Dunning and Reynaldo Lopez
Date: Dec. 8, 2016

Video: WSH@ATL: Eaton rips an RBI double down the line

This will go down as Washington's most aggressive move, as it unloaded its three top pitching prospects to get Eaton -- a gamble for a player who, while highly regarded, has never made an All-Star team. But the Nats had high hopes for Eaton and liked his favorable contract. His Nats' tenure has been mired by leg injuries so far -- a torn left ACL and a left ankle injury the next season -- and the club is hoping Eaton can return to form and prove he is worth every penny they paid to acquire him.

6. The Buffalo
Nats got from the Twins: C Wilson Ramos, LHP Joe Testa
Nats gave up: RHP Matt Capps
Date: July 29, 2010

Video: WSH@PIT: Ramos hits moonshot to the opposite field

Another Trade Deadline deal that worked out in Washington's favor, as it turned a few months of a rental closer in Capps into the club's starting backstop for parts of seven seasons. Ramos put together some of the best offensive seasons by a catcher in team history and was beloved by Nats fans as "The Buffalo."

7. A shutdown closer
Nats got from the Pirates: RHP Mark Melancon
Nats gave up: LHPs Felipe Vazquez and Taylor Hearn
Date: July 30, 2016

Video: MIA@WSH: Melancon secures a 10-7 win with 47th save

Adding relief help at the Deadline has become somewhat of an annual tradition for the Nats, even if the cost of such trades is beginning to add up. But they needed to add Melancon in 2016, a time when closers such as Andrew Miller and Aroldis Chapman fetched a heavy return in prospects.

8. The Papelbon trade
Nats got from the Phillies: RHP Jonathan Papelbon
Nats gave up: RHP Nick Pivetta
Date: July 28, 2015

Video: MIA@WSH: Papelbon induces double play to earn save

While this is a trade many fans wish the Nats could have back, it is certainly one of the biggest and most impactful in club history. Looking to boost the bullpen, Rizzo acquired Papelbon to replace Drew Storen as closer down the stretch in 2015, which infamously ended in the dugout implosion where Papelbon put his hands around the neck of soon-to-be National League MVP Bryce Harper.

9. Finally, a center fielder
Nats got from the Twins: OF Denard Span
Nats gave up: RHP Alex Meyer
Date: Nov. 29, 2012

Video: ATL@WSH: Span slides to make a fine grab in center

Washington had long been in need of a center fielder and leadoff hitter -- and it found both in Span, who spent three seasons with the Nationals. Even though he battled through some injuries, Span became a tablesetter and a strong defensive center fielder during the 2013 and '14 seasons.

10. Fister arrives
Nats got from the Tigers: RHP Doug Fister
Nats gave up: LHPs Robbie Ray and Ian Krol, INF Steve Lombardozzi
Date: Dec. 2, 2013

Video: CIN@WSH: Fister holds Reds to two runs over six

Fister was remarkable for the Nationals in 2014, helping lead the Nats back to the postseason and making up one-fifth of the club's "super-rotation" heading into the '15 season. Injuries and inconsistencies hindered Fister from making a greater impact, but the price was one the team was willing to pay for another strong rotation arm.

Jamal Collier has covered the Nationals for MLB.com since 2016. Follow him on Twitter at @jamalcollier.

Washington Nationals

10 biggest trades in Cubs history

MLB.com

Hall of Famers. Prolific home run hitters. Critical pieces to World Series champions. Each of those descriptions fit players who were added via trade throughout the Cubs' long and storied history.

With such a wealth of history, it is a daunting task to try to identify the best trades in the club's many seasons. When famous acquisitions such as Pete Alexander and Gary Matthews are among those that did not make the cut, you know the list is lengthy. Fans undoubtedly have opinions on the deals that did not work out in Chicago's favor. (Lou Brock says hello.)

Hall of Famers. Prolific home run hitters. Critical pieces to World Series champions. Each of those descriptions fit players who were added via trade throughout the Cubs' long and storied history.

With such a wealth of history, it is a daunting task to try to identify the best trades in the club's many seasons. When famous acquisitions such as Pete Alexander and Gary Matthews are among those that did not make the cut, you know the list is lengthy. Fans undoubtedly have opinions on the deals that did not work out in Chicago's favor. (Lou Brock says hello.)

This exercise is about the swaps that did pay dividends for the North Siders. With that in mind, here are our Top 10 trades in Cubs history:

1. Reeling in Ryno
Cubs got from Phillies: SS Larry Bowa, 2B Ryne Sandberg
Cubs gave up: SS Ivan de Jesus
Date: Jan. 27, 1982

Sandberg was considered a throw-in part of this trade, but he finished his career as one of the greatest second basemen in MLB history. Over 15 seasons with the Cubs, Sandberg amassed 282 homers, 403 doubles and 2,385 hits. The Hall of Famer was a seven-time Silver Slugger Award winner, nine-time Gold Glove Award recipient, 10-time All-Star and took home the National League Most Valuable Player Award in 1984. The Phillies, meanwhile, got three underwhelming seasons out of de Jesus.

Video: Cubs Retired Number: No. 23, Ryne Sandberg

2. Bell for Sosa
Cubs got from White Sox: LHP Ken Patterson, OF Sammy Sosa
Cubs gave up: OF George Bell
Date: March 30, 1992

The White Sox swung this trade for Bell with the idea of utilizing the veteran slugger -- coming off a strong 1991 tour with the Cubs -- as a designated hitter. The crosstown deal sent a raw talent in Sosa to the Cubs, who watched him turn into one of the game's all-time great power hitters. Sosa belted 545 of his 609 career homers on the North Side, where he made seven All-Star teams and won the NL MVP in '98. That summer, Sosa and Cardinals slugger Mark McGwire captivated the baseball world while chasing down Rogers Maris' previous single-season homer mark of 61 in '61.

Video: A look at some of Sosa's top long balls with Cubs

3. Finding Fergie
Cubs got from Phillies: OF John Herrnstein, RHP Ferguson Jenkins, OF Adolfo Phillips
Cubs gave up: RHP Bob Buhl, RHP Larry Jackson
Date: April 21, 1966

Jenkins showed promise in his debut with the Phillies, but he blossomed when the Cubs landed the righty and put him in their rotation. He spent parts of 10 seasons with Chicago, piling up 167 wins with a 3.20 ERA with the North Siders. Along the way, he made three All-Star teams and finished in the top three in NL Cy Young Award voting four times, including winning the award in 1971. Jenkins was enshrined in the Hall of Fame in '91. For Philadelphia, Jackson was most noteworthy, posting a 2.95 ERA over 752 1/3 innings over parts of three seasons.

Video: Cubs Retired Number: No. 31, Ferguson Jenkins

4. Adding Three Finger
Cubs got from Cardinals: RHP Mordecai Brown, C Jack O'Neill
Cubs gave up: C Larry McLean, RHP Jack Taylor
Date: Dec. 12, 1903

"Three Finger" Brown spent 10 of his 14 seasons with Chicago, during which he fashioned a 1.80 ERA. Statistics from that early era look much different than today, but it is still remarkable to see 48 shutouts and 206 complete games over 2,329 innings with Chicago. The Hall of Famer also played a key role in the Cubs' back-to-back World Series triumphs over Detroit in 1907-08, giving up no runs over 20 innings. On the other side of the coin, Taylor was brilliant for St. Louis in 1904 (2.22 ERA in 352 innings), but his career was done by '08.

5. Baltimore swap
Cubs got from Orioles: RHP Jake Arrieta, RHP Pedro Strop and international bonus cash
Cubs gave up: RHP Scott Feldman, C Steve Clevenger
Date: July 2, 2013

This wound up being a flop for the Orioles, who only got an underwhelming half-season out of Feldman and nothing to write home about from Clevenger over a few Major League tours. Arrieta, on the other hand, blossomed into a frontline starter and Strop a bullpen fixture with the Cubs. Arrieta went 68-31 with a 2.73 ERA in parts of five seasons with Chicago, winning the 2015 NL Cy Young Award with a 22-6 ledger and 1.77 ERA. In '16, he went 2-0 with a 2.38 ERA in two World Series starts to help lead the Cubs to their first championship since 1908.

Video: Arrieta Wins the NL Cy Young

6. Acquiring Kiki
Cubs got from Pirates: OF Kiki Cuyler
Cubs gave up: INF Sparky Adams, OF Pete Scott
Date: Nov. 27, 1927

The Cubs netted Cuyler in the prime of his Hall of Fame career, which included playing in the 1929 and '32 World Series with Chicago. Cuyler was with the Cubs for eight of his 18 seasons, in which he hit .321 with 128 homers, 157 triples, 328 steals, 394 doubles, 1,304 runs scored and an .860 OPS. He scored 155 runs in 156 games in '30 and was an All-Star with the Cubs in '34. Combined, Pittsburgh only received three years of production between Adams and Scott.

7. The Red Baron
Cubs got from Indians: RHP George Frazier, C Ron Hassey, RHP Rick Sutcliffe
Cubs gave up: RHP Darryl Banks, OF Joe Carter, OF Mel Hall, RHP Don Schultze
Date: June 13, 1984

Cleveland netted six productive seasons out of Carter (126 steals, 151 homers and 530 RBIs) and eventually flipped him to the Padres in '89 to land catcher Sandy Alomar and second baseman Carlos Baerga. The Cubs' acquisition of Sutcliffe, however, produced one of the great Cy Young stories in history. After posting a 5.15 ERA for the Indians to start the '84 campaign, Sutcliffe went 16-1 with a 2.69 ERA down the stretch after joini