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Scully to return for 67th season

MLB.com

LOS ANGELES -- The Dodgers have a personnel decision greeted with unanimous support on Friday, as Vin Scully will return for a 67th season as the club's announcer.

"I talked it over with my wife, Sandi, and my family and we've decided to do it again in 2016," Scully said in a release. "There's no place like home ... and we look forward to being a part of it with all of our friends."  

Full Game Coverage

LOS ANGELES -- The Dodgers have a personnel decision greeted with unanimous support on Friday, as Vin Scully will return for a 67th season as the club's announcer.

"I talked it over with my wife, Sandi, and my family and we've decided to do it again in 2016," Scully said in a release. "There's no place like home ... and we look forward to being a part of it with all of our friends."  

Full Game Coverage

The announcement was made on the Dodgers videoboard by Jimmy Kimmel, with the aid of cue cards, after the top of the second inning during the Dodgers' 4-1 victory over the Cubs.

"Vin is a national treasure and the Dodgers couldn't be happier to have him back at the microphone in 2016," said Dodgers president and CEO Stan Kasten. "Vin makes every broadcast special and generation after generation of Dodger fans have been blessed to be able to listen to him create his poetic magic since 1950. We look forward to adding many new chapters to that legacy in 2016." 

Video: CHC@LAD: Utley, Kershaw excited for Scully's return

The Hall of Famer has cut back his travel schedule in recent years, but he remains a baseball icon and one of the most beloved figures in Los Angeles history.

Video: CHC@LAD: Scully fans celebrate during the game

The Dodgers are currently in their 56th year in Los Angeles, and Scully has been the voice and the face of the organization since it arrived. He joined Red Barber and Connie Desmond on the Brooklyn Dodgers broadcast team in 1950, one year after graduating from Fordham University. He has been working on one-year contracts since 2009.

In 1982, Scully was inducted into the broadcaster's wing of Baseball's Hall of Fame as winner of the Ford C. Frick Award, and he also had his star placed on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 2001, the Dodger Stadium press box was named in Scully's honor.

Scully has called 25 World Series, three perfect games, 19 no-hitters and 12 All-Star Games. Scully's memorable moments behind the microphone include his call of the Brooklyn Dodgers' only championship in 1955, Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series, Kirk Gibson's walk-off home run in the 1988 World Series, Hank Aaron's record-setting 715th home run, Sandy Koufax's four no-hitters, including a perfect game, and the scoreless-innings streaks of Dodger greats Don Drysdale and Orel Hershiser.

Video: Scully's memorable calls from Kershaw's June gem

In 2009, Scully was inducted into the National Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame, and he was named the Top Sportscaster of All-Time by the American Sportscasters Association. In 2008, he was inducted into the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame and the California Sports Hall of Fame.

Throughout his prestigious broadcasting career, Scully has received numerous awards, including being named the California Sports Broadcaster of the Year 29 times by the National Sportswriters and Sportscasters Association; in 2000, Scully was voted as Sportscaster of the 20th Century by more than 500 national members of the American Sportscasters Association.

 

According to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, his years of service are believed to be the longest tenure of any broadcaster in sports history.

In Los Angeles, Scully has called Dodgers World Series championships in 1959, '63, '65, '81 and '88, and he was elected the top sportscaster of the 20th century by the nonprofit American Sportscasters Association.

In 1976, Scully was voted by Dodgers fans as the most memorable personality in Los Angeles Dodgers history.

Video: Scully honored with prestigious Commissioner's Award

Last year, Scully was presented the Commissioner's Historic Achievement Award by Commissioner Emeritus Bud Selig. Scully is only the second non-player to receive the award, which recognizes accomplishments and contributions of historical significance. The other person was Rachel Robinson, who is the widow of Jackie Robinson, the late Brooklyn Dodgers great who broke the color barrier. 

Ken Gurnick is a reporter for MLB.com.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Los Angeles Dodgers