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What's the strangest food you've eaten at a ballgame?

Heidi Watney did not have a good day at the office yesterday. While sampling some of the fare at Progressive Field in Cleveland, the Red Sox on field reporter had a battle with a fried chicken and waffle sandwich, and lost. She got a little queasy, chewed for way too long, but eventually swallowed. Her verdict -- "not my first choice, but I got it down." That review probably didn't please Chef Mike, who was standing right next to her.

Now, this was an embarrassing moment to be sure, but I don't blame Heidi. What is a northern city like Cleveland doing trying to replicate chicken and waffles, which in my mind is a southern staple?

I recently spent some time in Roanoke, Virginia, and was fortunate enough to get chicken and waffles at a place that was called…Thelma's Chicken and Waffles. Not the most original name, but if you're looking for chicken and waffles, going to a place that has it in their name is a good start. Plus, Virginia is a southern state. And trust me when I tell you that it was delicious. Perfectly cooked chicken that was crispy and hot on top of a waffle that soaked up all of the juice from the chicken, and then syrup over the entire thing. Heaven.

I like the idea of getting creative with ballpark food, but if you're going to add something like a chicken and waffle sandwich, you better have a guy in the kitchen whose name is "Bubba", or "Billy Bob", and if not, head to a state below the Mason-Dixon line and grab someone who just looks like he has a lot of experience cooking/eating chicken and waffles (hint: look for a thickish guy).

What's the most unusual thing you've eaten at a ballpark? Send me a tweet @rwags614.

Heidi Watney did not have a good day at the office yesterday. While sampling some of the fare at Progressive Field in Cleveland, the Red Sox on field reporter had a battle with a fried chicken and waffle sandwich, and lost. She got a little queasy, chewed for way too long, but eventually swallowed. Her verdict -- "not my first choice, but I got it down." That review probably didn't please Chef Mike, who was standing right next to her.

Now, this was an embarrassing moment to be sure, but I don't blame Heidi. What is a northern city like Cleveland doing trying to replicate chicken and waffles, which in my mind is a southern staple?

I recently spent some time in Roanoke, Virginia, and was fortunate enough to get chicken and waffles at a place that was called…Thelma's Chicken and Waffles. Not the most original name, but if you're looking for chicken and waffles, going to a place that has it in their name is a good start. Plus, Virginia is a southern state. And trust me when I tell you that it was delicious. Perfectly cooked chicken that was crispy and hot on top of a waffle that soaked up all of the juice from the chicken, and then syrup over the entire thing. Heaven.

I like the idea of getting creative with ballpark food, but if you're going to add something like a chicken and waffle sandwich, you better have a guy in the kitchen whose name is "Bubba", or "Billy Bob", and if not, head to a state below the Mason-Dixon line and grab someone who just looks like he has a lot of experience cooking/eating chicken and waffles (hint: look for a thickish guy).

What's the most unusual thing you've eaten at a ballpark? Send me a tweet @rwags614.