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Castillo confident in ability to mesh with pitchers

Anderson happy for clean slate; Davidson already impressing
MLB.com

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Despite being with his fifth team in four years, catcher Welington Castillo says it isn't that difficult to adjust to a new organization and pitching staff.

"I know how to manage that situation," Castillo said Friday morning before the White Sox workout at Camelback Ranch. "The more I catch them, the more I talk to them, that relationship will come out. I don't worry about that. I know myself and I'm going to try to get with everybody and try to get the confidence out of them."

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Despite being with his fifth team in four years, catcher Welington Castillo says it isn't that difficult to adjust to a new organization and pitching staff.

"I know how to manage that situation," Castillo said Friday morning before the White Sox workout at Camelback Ranch. "The more I catch them, the more I talk to them, that relationship will come out. I don't worry about that. I know myself and I'm going to try to get with everybody and try to get the confidence out of them."

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After Castillo spent eight seasons in the Cubs' organization, he played for three teams in 2015 (Chicago, Seattle and Arizona), spent all of '16 with the D-backs and played for the Orioles last year.

:: Spring Training coverage presented by Camping World ::

"I was very comfortable with Welly when I was on the North Side," said manager Rick Renteria, who managed the Cubs in 2014. "I always liked him as a player, a catcher; always driven, hard-working."

Castillo, too, is glad to reunite with Renteria.

"It's helped a lot. I know him, he knows me. He knows what kind of person, what kind of player I am," said Castillo, a career .259 hitter who hit .282 with 20 home runs last season. "I think that will help a lot, because he knows the kind of player I am."

Video: Anderson talks about getting ready for the season

Anderson in better place a year after tragedy

After he carried his grief for a murdered friend through much of last season, White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson says he is in a much better place this spring.

"This is the most comfortable I've been," said Anderson, who arrived at the team's Spring Training facility almost two weeks earlier than required. "I'm talking more, smiling more. I'm in a great position. I'm so honored and humbled and excited to be in the position I am."

Along those lines, his only goal -- or at least the only he would share with the media -- for the upcoming season is to have fun.

"Have fun, have fun, just have fun," he said. "The rest of the goals will get accomplished when I have fun."

Renteria has already taken notice of Anderson's demeanor.

"He looks very, very relaxed. He looks very happy," Renteria said. "I think that this year he is able to come in, fresh mind, prepared to go out and compete and do the job that he ended up finishing doing during that latter part of [last] season."

Davidson already impressing

Matt Davidson, like Anderson, didn't have to report to camp until Monday. But he arrived plenty early and put on an impressive show during a batting-practice session on one of the back fields.

"He certainly looks very comfortable. The ball is jumping off his bat very well right now," said Renteria, who watched as nearly 30 position players took BP. "Matty was swinging the bat like this even last year when we came to Spring [Training]."

Davidson could end up as the White Sox starting third baseman or designated hitter come Opening Day, and likely will see some time at first base during the season. In his first full year in the Majors a year ago, he hit .220/.260/.452 with 26 home runs and 68 RBIs in 118 games.

Chris Thomas is a contributor to MLB.com.

Chicago White Sox