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Inbox: Who's on list to lead O's into new era?

Beat reporter Brittany Ghiroli answers questions from fans
MLB.com

Any word on the manager and general manager search?
-- Scott L., White Marsh, Md.

It's been fairly quiet on the front-office front, and you can expect the search will start from the top. The new general manager will have a say in who manages, and the coaching staff and other smaller hires trickle down from there. What's interesting to me is how many names have leaked out for other front-office jobs -- such as the Mets -- but you haven't heard anything out of Baltimore. This could be because they're still compiling a list, want to interview people who are involved in teams still playing or are just really good at keeping secrets. (Doubtful on that last one as these things always have a way of getting out.) Regardless, I'd be surprised if there isn't some movement in the next week. Yes, it's a big hire. But the Orioles can't afford to go into the offseason without a plan in place.

Any word on the manager and general manager search?
-- Scott L., White Marsh, Md.

It's been fairly quiet on the front-office front, and you can expect the search will start from the top. The new general manager will have a say in who manages, and the coaching staff and other smaller hires trickle down from there. What's interesting to me is how many names have leaked out for other front-office jobs -- such as the Mets -- but you haven't heard anything out of Baltimore. This could be because they're still compiling a list, want to interview people who are involved in teams still playing or are just really good at keeping secrets. (Doubtful on that last one as these things always have a way of getting out.) Regardless, I'd be surprised if there isn't some movement in the next week. Yes, it's a big hire. But the Orioles can't afford to go into the offseason without a plan in place.

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What are the chances the Orioles will sign Cuban prospect Victor Victor Mesa?
-- Carlos V., Dundalk, Md.

Similar to the GM/manager search, not a whole lot has leaked in regard to how serious a pursuit the Orioles are planning. We know they had a small contingent on hand recently in Miami to watch outfielders Victor Victor Mesa -- the top-ranked international prospect by MLB Pipeline -- Victor Mesa Jr. and pitcher Sandy Gaston. We know the Orioles and the Marlins are the top two landing spots, as they're the two clubs with the most international bonus pool money still available.

The front-office situation doesn't really come into play here. The Orioles have interim GM Brian Graham and vice president of baseball operations Brady Anderson is still in his current role. They have people who can make decisions and deals can still be made. (The one that always springs to mind is the O's claiming Darren O'Day off waivers before they hired Dan Duquette.) The sides have talked. I'm sure numbers have been exchanged. But there's no timetable and no way to handicap if the O's will secure Mesa, his brother or Gaston. But it would be a heck of a way to open a long offseason.

I know it's a rebuild, but will the Orioles do anything exciting in free agency? Add a veteran starting pitcher, maybe?
-- Joe L., Reading, Pa.

Depends on what you deem exciting. Obviously the O's shed a lot of payroll in all of the in-season trades. And they will save even more by hiring a manager who won't command the $3 million or so that Buck Showalter did. The Orioles will add a few relievers, maybe a starter or two. But the real issue has to be the infield. Will Baltimore look for a few cheap defensive-minded players? You have to consider in a rebuild how important it is to develop some of the younger pitchers. Guys have to be able to make the plays, and the Orioles' defense was awful last year. I'm more interested in what the O's will do there than if they add a starter.

What are the chances of bringing back any of their free agents?
-- Sara H., Dumfries, Va.

Slim. The Orioles traded players like Manny Machado, Zach Britton and Brad Brach in-season, because they didn't factor into the team's future plans. Machado is way out of the O's price range, and as for the other two, a rebuilding team doesn't need to spend its resources nailing down a back end of the bullpen.

Outfielder Adam Jones is the most interesting case, as I don't think anyone knows what that market will look like. I'd expect the 33-year-old will want a multiyear deal, but free agency hasn't been kind to older position players in recent offseasons. I could see a scenario in which Jones' market isn't there and the Orioles bring him back as a veteran on a shorter deal. It's not out of the question. But there are a lot of bridges to pass before that becomes even a possibility.

Brittany Ghiroli has covered the Orioles for MLB.com since 2010. Follow her on Facebook and Twitter @britt_ghiroli, and listen to her podcast.

Baltimore Orioles

Orioles' all-time retired numbers

MLB.com

BALTIMORE -- The Orioles have been quick to identify franchise-changing talent. And the six numbers they've retired reflect that, as the O's deserve some credit for putting these uniforms on ice at Camden Yards. Yes, being a surefire Hall of Famer is a tall task, but these half-dozen numbers (along with No. 42 for Jackie Robinson) represent the glory, prestige and remarkable talent that has graced the black and orange. From a manager to starting pitchers and some iconic infielders, the Orioles have a steep price of admission for retiring numbers. These aren't merely great players, they are generational talents.

Earl Weaver, manager: No. 4
Number retired: 1982
Weaver managed the Orioles from 1968-82, winning four American League pennants (including three in a row from 1969-71) and the 1970 World Series. He retired after the 1982 season, then briefly came back in 1985. He retired for good after the 1986 season, the only losing season under his tenure.

BALTIMORE -- The Orioles have been quick to identify franchise-changing talent. And the six numbers they've retired reflect that, as the O's deserve some credit for putting these uniforms on ice at Camden Yards. Yes, being a surefire Hall of Famer is a tall task, but these half-dozen numbers (along with No. 42 for Jackie Robinson) represent the glory, prestige and remarkable talent that has graced the black and orange. From a manager to starting pitchers and some iconic infielders, the Orioles have a steep price of admission for retiring numbers. These aren't merely great players, they are generational talents.

Earl Weaver, manager: No. 4
Number retired: 1982
Weaver managed the Orioles from 1968-82, winning four American League pennants (including three in a row from 1969-71) and the 1970 World Series. He retired after the 1982 season, then briefly came back in 1985. He retired for good after the 1986 season, the only losing season under his tenure.

Video: Orioles Retired Number: No. 4, Earl Weaver

Eddie Murray, 1B: No. 33
Number retired: 1998
Murray played 13 seasons with the Orioles, winning the 1977 Rookie of the Year Award. The first baseman received MVP votes in each of the next eight seasons, including back-to-back second-place finishes in 1982-83. He had 2,080 of his 3,255 career hits and 343 of his 504 career homers in an Orioles uniform. Elected into the Hall of Fame in 2003, his first year of eligibility, Murray also played for the Dodgers, Mets, Indians and Angels.

Video: DET@BAL: Eddie Murray hits his 500th home run

Jim Palmer SP: No. 22
Number retired: 1985
The best pitcher in club history, Palmer played all 19 seasons with Baltimore. A three-time Cy Young Award winner, Palmer appeared in the postseason seven times and was a vital part of three World Series teams. Palmer won four Gold Gloves and hit the 20-win mark eight times. He was elected into the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Video: Orioles Retired Number: No. 22, Jim Palmer

Brooks Robinson, 3B: No. 5
Number retired: 1977
The Human Vacuum Cleaner, Robinson played his entire 23-year career with the Orioles. He claimed the 1964 American League MVP Award and 16 straight Gold Gloves from 1960-75. His solid offense and premium defense made him a first-ballot Hall of Famer in 1983. Robinson retired in 1977 and the Orioles retired his number shortly thereafter.

Video: Robinson shines with glove, bat in '70 World Series

Cal Ripken, Jr., SS: No. 8
Number retired: 2001
Like Brooks, Ripken spent his entire career in the Orioles infield. Most famous for the "Iron Man" streak in which he surpassed Lou Gehrig for consecutive games played, Ripken earned the 1982 Rookie of the Year Award and MVP Awards in 1983 and 1991. He was originally drafted in the second round of the 1978 First Year Player Draft and reached the Hall of Fame -- with 98.5 percent of the vote -- in 2007.

Video: CAL@BAL: Ripken homers on historic night

Frank Robinson, OF: No. 20
Number retired: 1972
Robinson played only six years in Baltimore, but he was part of four World Series-bound teams. He won the Triple Crown in 1966, bringing home the MVP Award and helping the Orioles win the World Series. The Orioles traded Robinson to the Dodgers in 1971, but they retired his number the next year before his playing career was even over. He became the first player to have his uniform number retired by the Orioles.

Video: Orioles Legends Series: Frank Robinson

Note: On April 15, 1997, the Orioles joined every team in MLB in retiring No. 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson.

Brittany Ghiroli has covered the Orioles for MLB.com since 2010. Follow her on Facebook and Twitter @britt_ghiroli, and listen to her podcast.

Baltimore Orioles

Pipeline names Orioles' Prospects of the Year

MLB.com

BALTIMORE -- As the Orioles head into a transitional phase that started with a rebuild and will soon include a new general manager and manager, Baltimore's beleaguered farm system has shown some promise. Leading the charge is outfielder Cedric Mullins and left-handed pitcher Zac Lowther, who were named MLB Pipeline's Prospects of the Year for the Orioles.

Each team's Hitting and Pitching Prospects of the Year were chosen by the MLB Pipeline staff. To receive consideration, players must have spent at least half the year in the Minors and appeared on the team's Top 30 Prospects list.

BALTIMORE -- As the Orioles head into a transitional phase that started with a rebuild and will soon include a new general manager and manager, Baltimore's beleaguered farm system has shown some promise. Leading the charge is outfielder Cedric Mullins and left-handed pitcher Zac Lowther, who were named MLB Pipeline's Prospects of the Year for the Orioles.

Each team's Hitting and Pitching Prospects of the Year were chosen by the MLB Pipeline staff. To receive consideration, players must have spent at least half the year in the Minors and appeared on the team's Top 30 Prospects list.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

Mullins, a 13th-round Draft pick in 2015, started the season at Double-A Bowie and hit .289 with 12 home runs and 29 doubles between there and Triple-A Norfolk. He made his big league debut on Aug. 10, taking over center field duties from longtime outfielder Adam Jones. Mullins became the first Oriole ever to record a three-hit debut and was a bright spot for the O's in a tough 2018.

Mullins, who turned 24 last week, hit .235/.312/.359 with nine doubles, four homers and 11 RBIs in 45 big league games. His mentality was immediately impressive to former Oriole manager Buck Showalter.

"I saw that calmness, [bench coach John Russell] and I were talking about it in Spring Training the first time he came over [to big league camp]," Showalter said after Mullins' first week. "He's not a guy that has to try to see how easy he can make things look. There's just a flow to his game. I think it's one of those guys that, when you do the analytics and stuff -- his closing speed and all that other stuff --you might be surprised by how good he is, compared to the way it looks to the naked eye."

Video: BAL@NYY: Mullins reaches on an error, drives in a run

Lowther is ranked as the O's No. 17 prospect. A competitive-balance pick in last year's Draft, he dominated at Class A Delmarva, compiling a 1.16 ERA in six starts. He was promoted to Class A Advanced Frederick, going 5-3 with a 2.53 ERA in the Carolina League. Between the two levels, he posted a 2.18 ERA in 123 2/3 innings with a 0.98 WHIP.

Mullins was named the Brooks Robinson Orioles Minor League Player of the Year, while Lowther was Co-Jim Palmer Pitcher of the Year, sharing the honors with Double-A Bowie's Keegan Akin.

Video: Callis breaks down MLB Pipeline's Team of the Week

The 22-year-old Lowther, who was selected out of Xavier, is listed at 6-foot-2 and 235 pounds.

Last year's winners were outfielder Austin Hays and lefty Alex Wells. Hays, a candidate for the big league club, dealt with injury all season. Wells went 7-8 with a 3.47 ERA in 24 starts for Frederick. Hays is the Orioles' fourth-best prospect while Wells is listed at No. 25.

Brittany Ghiroli has covered the Orioles for MLB.com since 2010. Follow her on Facebook and Twitter @britt_ghiroli, and listen to her podcast.

Baltimore Orioles

Here's what happened in Wednesday's AFL action

MLB.com

Here's a team-by-team breakdown of how all 30 teams' prospects fared in Arizona Fall League action on Wednesday:

Gameday: Peoria 7, Surprise 2 | Mesa 1, Salt River 6 | Glendale 2, Scottsdale 1

Here's a team-by-team breakdown of how all 30 teams' prospects fared in Arizona Fall League action on Wednesday:

Gameday: Peoria 7, Surprise 2 | Mesa 1, Salt River 6 | Glendale 2, Scottsdale 1

AL East

Blue Jays (Surprise)
Blue Jays top prospect Vladimir Guerrero Jr. (No. 1 overall) posted his second non-multi-hit performance during the Fall League season as he went 1-for-4 with a single. The 19-year-old phenom is hitting .538 with five doubles and nine RBIs and has hit safely in all six of his games. No. 9 Cavan Biggio went 0-for-4 with a walk and also recorded an outfield assist when he helped double a runner off first base in the seventh inning. Right-hander Jackson McClelland pitched around three walks to complete two hitless innings in relief. He's posted four hitless frames between two appearances.

Orioles (Glendale)
Orioles pitching prospects Chris Lee and Tyler Erwin had near opposite nights on the mound. Lee struck out four over four scoreless innings and Erwin walked three, while only recording one out. Tanner Chleborad also threw in the game and fired one scoreless frame. Martin Cervenka entered the game as a pinch hitter and finished 0-for-2.

2018 Arizona Fall League rosters

Rays (Peoria)
Rays No. 17 prospect Joe McCarthy scored a run and walked three times out of the No. 3 spot in the lineup. Brandon Lawson allowed one earned run on two hits and two walks with three strikeouts in 1 2/3 innings of relief.

Red Sox (Mesa)
Bobby Dalbec, the Red Sox No. 6 prospect, went 0-for-4, while Josh Ockimey (No. 10) didn't fare much better, finishing 1-for-4. Esteban Quiroz also went 0-for-4 and is now hitting .250. Josh Taylor got the start, but had a rough go of it as he gave up three hits in two innings. Taylor gave up three runs, but onle one was earned.

Yankees (Scottsdale)
Yankees prospects struggled offensively as Thairo Estrada (Yankees No. 16), Estevan Florial (No. 2) and Steven Sensley went 1-for-11.

AL Central

Indians (Glendale)
Yu Change, the Indians No. 6 prospect, Li-Jen Chu and Connor Marabell went 1-for-13. Rob Kaminsky struck out two and retired all four batters he faced.

Royals (Surprise)
No Royals prospects played on Wednesday.

Tigers (Mesa)
Tigers No. 8 prospect Daz Cameron went 0-for-3, while Jake Rogers (No. 12) picked up a single and went 1-for-3. Daniel Woodrow also went 1-for-2 with an RBI. A trio of Tigers pitching prospects were also in action as Sandy Baez (No. 26), Eduardo Jimenez and John Schreiber all threw for the Solar Sox. Baez threw a scoreless 1 1/3 innings, while Jimenez and Schreiber combined to give up three runs (two earned) in 2 2/3 innings. 

Twins (Salt River)
No Twins prospects played on Wednesday.

White Sox (Glendale)
White Sox No. 17 prospect Zack Burdi struck out two while retiring the side in order. Danny Dopico was stuck with a hard-luck loss, but performed well as he gave up an unearned run and fanned three in 1 2/3 innings. Luis Alexander Basabe (No. 9) raised his average to .273 with a 2-for-4 night. Laz Rivera went 1-for-4 and scored a run.

AL West

A's (Salt River)
Luis Barrera went 1-for-4 and scored a run.

Angels (Mesa)
Angels No. 4 prospect Jahmai Jones had a tough night at the plate, finishing 1-for-4 with a trio of strikeouts. Jones is now hitting .250 in the Fall League.

Astros (Scottsdale)
Ronnie Dawson went 0-for-4.

Mariners (Peoria)
Mariners No. 9 prospect Wyatt Mills (1 1/3 innings pitched, one walk, one strikeout) and David McKay (one inning, one walk, two strikeouts) both made scoreless appearances out of the bullpen. Catcher Joe DeCarlo scored a run and walked three times as part of an 0-for-2 showing.

Rangers (Surprise)
Saguaros starter Tai Tiedemann could not escape the first inning, as he allowed three earned runs on three hits and two walks while recording only two outs. Demarcus Evans, the Minors' strikeouts-per-nine-innings leader (16.6) among relievers in '18, fanned three batters but allowed two earned runs on two hits and two walks in his lone relief inning. Rangers No. 15 prospect C.D. Pelham scuffled as well, giving up one earned run on one hit and three walks. Third baseman Charles Leblanc went 0-for-4 with a strikeout.

NL East

Braves (Peoria)
Braves No. 6 prospect Cristian Pache (No. 68 overall) went 2-for-5 with two singles and two RBIs, while outfielder Izzy Wilson tallied his first Fall League double to finish 2-for-4 with a run and a stolen base. Javelinas shortstop Ray-Patrick Didder went 0-for-3 out of the leadoff spot, but he drew three walks and stole two bases.

Marlins (Salt River)
Marlins No. 16 prospect Jordan Yamamoto put together a stron performance for the second time in as many Fall League starts. The right-hander gave up one run on two hits and struck out six over three innings. Tommy Eveld, Chad Smith and Kyle Keller also took the mound and each threw a scoreless inning. Keller struck out the side. Offensively, Monte Harrison (No. 1) drove in a pair of runs with RBI singles, finishing 2-for-3 and Brian Miller went 1-for-4. More »

Video: Yamamoto on Outing, Coming back from Injury, Statue

Mets (Scottsdale)
Mets No. 2 prospect Peter Alonso went 0-for-3, but did drive in the winning run when he drew a bases-loaded walk in the bottom of the 11th. Andres Gimenez (No. 1) entered the game as a pinch-runner and scored the winning run on Alonso's walk. Gerson Bautista gave up one run on one hit in 1/3 of an inning. More »

Nationals (Mesa)
Nationals No. 2 prospect Carter Kieboom went 0-for-3, but also scored a run. Meanwhile, Daniel Johnson (No. 7) and Jake Noll both went 0-for-4.

Phillies (Scottsdale)
Austin Listi drew a walk in his only plate appearance, while Darik Hall went 1-for-3 and Arquimedes Gamboa (Phillies No. 11) went 1-for-4. Luke Leftwich gave up one hit, but also struck out the side in his inning of work.

NL Central

Brewers (Peoria)
Brewers No. 1 prospect Keston Hiura (No. 30 overall) recorded his Fall League-leading 16th RBI -- a total he's amassed in only six games -- as he went 1-for-5. First baseman Weston Wilson went 0-for-4 with three strikeouts and committed an error, his third in two games this fall.

Cardinals (Surprise)
Cardinals No. 30 prospect Connor Jones allowed one earned run on three hits in 2 1/3 innings of relief, striking out four. Shortstop Tommy Edman and catcher Jeremy Martinez each went 1-for-4 in a game that the Saguaros mustered only five hits. Second baseman Andy Young's double was the club's only extra-base hit, and he also walked twice and scored a run. Lane Thomas went 0-for-4 with two strikeouts.

Cubs (Mesa)
Cubs No. 6 prospect Nico Hoerner went 1-for-4, while Manuel Rondon threw two scoreless innings. He didn't yield a hit, but walked two and struck out two.

Pirates (Surprise)
Pirates No. 8 prospect Bryan Reynolds went 0-for-1 with two walks and a first-inning sacrifice fly that put Surprise on the board. Will Craig singled and struck out twice in a 1-for-4 performance. 6-foot-6 righty Geoff Hartlieb was sharp out of the Saguaros' bullpen as he racked up four strikeouts across two scoreless innings.

Reds (Scottsdale)
Reds' No. 3 prospect Taylor Trammell drove in Scottsdale's first run, but that was the extent of his night as he went 1-for-4 with an RBI. Alfredo Rodriguez (No. 23) went 0-for-4. A trio of Reds pitching prospects also got in the game as Ty Boyles, Alex Powers and Wyatt Strahan finished the game with a combined 3 2/3 scoreless innings.

NL West

D-backs (Salt River)
D-backs' No. 5 prospect Daulton Varsho reached base in all four of his trips to the plate. Varsho went 2-for-2 with two RBIs and also drew a pair of walks. Jazz Chisholm (No. 3) went 1-for-5, but made some nice plays in the field and Dominic Miroglio went 0-for-4.

Dodgers (Glendale)
Andre Scrubb gave up one run on two hits in an inning. Cody Thomas went 0-for-3 and drew a walk.

Giants (Scottsdale)
Giants No. 10 prospect Heath Quinn, C.J. Hinojosa (No. 28) and Matt Winn struggled at the plate and combined for a 1-for-12 night. Melvin Adon (No. 19) and Garrett Williams (No. 20) fared much better on the mound. Williams, who started for the Scorpions, gave up three hits over four scoreless innings while Adon followed him and struck out four in two perfect frames.

Padres (Peoria)
Padres No. 23 prospect Hudson Potts connected on his first Fall League homer, a three-run shot with two outs in the first inning that put the Javelinas ahead for good. He went 2-for-5 and also stole a base. Toolsy outfielder Buddy Reed (No. 13) paced the offense with his 3-for-5 showing from the bottom of the lineup. He scored a team-high two runs and stole two bases. Peoria starter Miguel Diaz allowed one earned run on two hits over four innings to earn the win, and fireballer Dauris Valdez closed it out with a scoreless ninth. More »

Video: Hudson Potts discusses his homer, Buddy Reed

Rockies (Salt River)
Tyler Nevin, the Rockies No. 11 prospect, upped his AFL RBI total to seven as he finished 2-for-4 with two RBIs. On the mound, Jesus Tinoco (No. 20) and Mitch Horacek combined for three scoreless innings.

Key 2018-19 free agents for all 30 MLB teams

MLB.com

An impressive collection of talent will hit the open market when free agency gets underway this offseason, and players are eligible to sign with a new team five days after the conclusion of the World Series. Here is a division-by-division breakdown of the key free agents for all 30 Major League clubs.

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

An impressive collection of talent will hit the open market when free agency gets underway this offseason, and players are eligible to sign with a new team five days after the conclusion of the World Series. Here is a division-by-division breakdown of the key free agents for all 30 Major League clubs.

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

Atlanta Braves
Key free agents: RHP Brad Brach, 1B Lucas Duda, 3B Ryan Flaherty, OF Nick Markakis, C Rene Rivera, RHP Anibal Sanchez, C Kurt Suzuki, LHP Jonny Venters

Markakis was a valuable member of a youthful Braves club in 2018, providing veteran leadership and making the All-Star team for the first time in his career. Atlanta has a stellar farm system that is loaded with pitching prospects, which is one of the reasons why Sanchez is unlikely to be back after his impressive rebound campaign. But without an obvious replacement for Markakis in right field, the door remains open for the soon-to-be 35-year-old to return. Suzuki has formed a productive catching tandem with Tyler Flowers over the past two seasons, but the 35-year-old may be too expensive to bring back for a part-time role.

Miami Marlins
Key free agents: None

The Marlins' roster is replete with players who are at the early stages of their big league careers, putting them years away from free agency. After trading multiple big-name players last offseason, Miami will likely now look to deal veterans Starlin Castro and Martin Prado, as they are owed nearly $27 million combined in 2019.

New York Mets
Key free agents: LHP Jerry Blevins, OF Austin Jackson, C Devin Mesoraco, RHP AJ Ramos, INF Jose Reyes

There's a chance the Mets won't bring back any of these players after they combined for -1.7 Wins Above Replacement in 2018, per FanGraphs. With Travis d'Arnaud, T.J. Rivera and Juan Lagares returning from injuries, the Mets have obvious replacements for Mesoraco, Reyes and Jackson next year. Blevins is more likely to be back than Ramos, whose recovery from right shoulder surgery is expected to extend into next June and possibly longer.

Philadelphia Phillies
Key free agents: 3B/OF Jose Bautista, INF Asdrubal Cabrera, LHP Aaron Loup, C Wilson Ramos

All four players on Philadelphia's list were acquired late in the 2018 campaign as the Phillies made a playoff push that ultimately fell short. Instead of bringing back Ramos, who is sure to fetch a sizable multi-year deal, the Phils may give 25-year-old Jorge Alfaro another chance to show he can handle starting duties behind the plate. Cabrera could be a fallback option if the Phillies are unable to land Manny Machado in free agency.

Washington Nationals
Key free agents: OF Bryce Harper, RHP Jeremy Hellickson, RHP Kelvin Herrera, RHP Greg Holland, 1B Mark Reynolds, C Matt Wieters

Harper will be one of the top free agents available this offseason, and the Nats will likely make a major push to keep him in Washington. The club might also be interested in bringing back Holland and Hellickson, but the two righties are sure to draw interest from other clubs after boosting their value with the Nats. Washington is expected to try to upgrade at the catcher spot, which could leave Wieters looking for a new home.

NL CENTRAL

Chicago Cubs
Key free agents: RHP Jesse Chavez, LHP Jorge De La Rosa, LHP Jaime Garcia (club option), LHP Cole Hamels (club option), OF Jason Heyward (can opt out of his contract), RHP Brandon Kintzler (club and player options), 2B Daniel Murphy, RHP Pedro Strop (club option), LHP Justin Wilson

The Cubs have many decisions to make this offseason, most notably regarding the $20 million club option for Hamels, who was acquired from the Rangers at the non-waiver Trade Deadline and recorded a terrific 2.36 ERA over 12 starts. They also have a bevy of bullpen arms that are set to depart or have club options. The Cubs could try to retain Chavez and Strop, and Murphy could also be back (particularly given Addison Russell's suspension), as president of baseball operations Theo Epstein spoke highly of the second baseman's contributions after his acquisition from the Nationals.

Cincinnati Reds
Key free agents: RHP Matt Harvey

Cincinnati elected to keep Harvey at the non-waiver Trade Deadline instead of flipping him to a contender, and now face a decision about the right-hander, given that he has expressed openness to returning and the Reds will be seeking starting pitching depth this offseason. Outside of Harvey, the Reds don't have any key departures or options to worry about this winter, though Scooter Gennett and Billy Hamilton are due for free agency following the 2019 season.

Milwaukee Brewers
Key free agents: LHP Gio Gonzalez, OF Curtis Granderson, RHP Jeremy Jeffress (club option), LHP Dan Jennings, C Erik Kratz, RHPJordan Lyles (club option), LHP Wade Miley, 3B Mike Moustakas (mutual option), IF Eric Sogard, RHP Joakim Soria (club option)

The Brewers have most of their pitching depth locked up beyond this season, with Gonzalez, an in-season acquisition, and Miley, who was initially signed to a Minor League contract before the season, the only two starters set for free agency this offseason. Soria, a key piece of the Brewers' bullpen in their playoff run, has a $10 million team option for 2019, while closing option Jeffress has a much cheaper $3.175 million team option. The 38-year-old Kratz and 37-year-old Granderson are also bound for free agency. Given their security all over the roster, the Brewers are set to contend again in 2019 even if they don't make a big offseason splash.

Pittsburgh Pirates
Key free agents: IF/OF Josh Harrison (club option), IF Jung Ho Kang (club option), SS Jordy Mercer

After making a splash by trading for Chris Archer in 2018, the Pirates appear to be mostly set with their pitching staff but will be looking for a bat in the offseason, likely at shortstop, especially if they don't end up bringing Kang back after his late-season cameo. Even if they don't make a Manny Machado-sized splash at shortstop, the market is deep this offseason, with Jose Iglesias, Freddy Galvis and Adeiny Hechavarria among the names that will be in play. It seems unlikely that the Pirates will pick up Harrison's $10.5 million option.

St. Louis Cardinals
Key free agents: 1B Matt Adams, RHP Bud Norris, C Francisco Pena, RHP Tyson Ross

Adam Wainwright already avoided free agency by agreeing to a one-year deal to return for his 15th season with the Cardinals. Improving the bullpen to build around Jordan Hicks will be a priority for the Cardinals, especially with the departure of Norris, who provided stability at closer for much of the season. Though Adams likely won't be on the Cardinals' radar again, St. Louis is thought to be looking for an impact left-handed hitter, with needs at outfield and third base.

NL WEST

Arizona Diamondbacks
Key free agents: RHP Clay Buchholz, LHP Patrick Corbin, RHP Randall Delgado, 2B Daniel Descalso, LHP Jake Diekman, 3B Eduardo Escobar, 1B Paul Goldschmidt (club option), OF Jon Jay, C Jeff Mathis, OF A.J. Pollock, C Chris Stewart, OF Yasmany Tomas (player option)

The D-backs could lose two key contributors this winter, with Corbin and Pollock likely to exceed Arizona's price range, but Buchholz, Descalso and Mathis are strong candidates to return. Neither Goldschmidt nor Tomas is expected to hit the open market. The D-backs are sure to pick up Goldschmidt's $14.5 million club option for 2019, and Tomas will undoubtedly exercise his player options for '19-20, valued at $15.5 million next year and $17 million in '20, after spending all of '18 in the Minors.

Colorado Rockies
Key free agents: C Drew Butera, OF Carlos Gonzalez, OF Matt Holliday, 2B DJ LeMahieu, RHP Seunghwan Oh (club option), RHP Adam Ottavino, OF Gerardo Parra

The Rockies will have to decide whether they want to compete for LeMahieu this winter or if they're ready to turn the reins at second base over to one of their middle-infield prospects, Garrett Hampson and Brendan Rodgers. They also face decisions in the outfield, where Gonzalez, Parra and Holliday are impending free agents, and in the bullpen with Ottavino and Oh, who has a $2.5 million option for 2019 with a $250,000 buyout.

Los Angeles Dodgers
Key free agents: RHP John Axford, 2B Brian Dozier, C Yasmani Grandal, RHP Daniel Hudson, LHP Clayton Kershaw (opt out), SS Manny Machado, RHP Ryan Madson, LHP Hyun-Jin Ryu

Machado is among the headliners in this year's star-studded free agent class, and longtime Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw could add his name to the mix if he opts out of his contract. The Dodgers will try to retain Machado, whom they acquired from the Orioles at the non-waiver Trade Deadline, but they'll have stiff competition as he's likely to cash in for a big payday. The oft-injured Ryu posted a 1.97 ERA through 15 regular season starts in 2018 and pitched well in the playoffs to improve his stock heading into free agency.

San Diego Padres
Key free agents: C A.J. Ellis, SS Freddy Galvis

The Padres' 2018 roster will remain mostly intact with only Galvis and Ellis entering free agency, and both are candidates to return. Ellis is less likely to be re-signed, however, with young catchers Austin Hedges and Francisco Mejia in the mix. San Diego may also let Galvis walk if he wants a multi-year deal, with Fernando Tatis Jr. (San Diego's No. 1 prospect, per MLB Pipeline) nearing big league readiness and Luis Urias (San Diego's No. 4 prospect) likely to take over as the club's starting second baseman in 2019.

San Francisco Giants
Key free agents: OF Gregor Blanco, RHP Madison Bumgarner (club option), LHP Derek Holland, C Nick Hundley, RHP Mark Melancon (can opt out of his contract), OF Hunter Pence, 3B Pablo Sandoval

The Giants are expected to pick up Bumgarner's $12 million option, and Melancon is almost certainly staying put for the final two years of his four-year, $62 million deal, but the club will likely part ways with veterans Pence and Blanco. The Giants may try bring back Holland, who enjoyed a bounceback campaign and anchored an injury-riddled Giants rotation in 2018, and Hundley, who capably backed up Buster Posey.

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Baltimore Orioles
Key free agents: OF Adam Jones

The O's list has just one man on it, as they traded nearly every player on an expiring contract, including Manny Machado, Zach Britton and Brad Brach, during their 2018 roster purge. Baltimore would have dealt Jones as well, but he was unwilling to waive his 10-and-5 rights. Jones may be interested in returning, but he would likely need to accept a significantly reduced role as the Orioles look to the future.

Boston Red Sox
Key free agents: RHP Nathan Eovaldi, RHP Joe Kelly, RHP Craig Kimbrel, 2B Ian Kinsler, IF Eduardo Nunez (player option), 1B/OF Steve Pearce, 2B Brandon Phillips, LHP Drew Pomeranz, LHP David Price (can opt out of his contract), LHP Chris Sale (club option)

Even if the Red Sox pick up Chris Sale's $15 million club option for 2019, which they likely will, and David Price doesn't opt out of the four years and $127 million remaining on his contract, they still have a number of important players hitting free agency. Kimbrel is the biggest name among them, though it's unclear if Boston will be willing to hand out a big contract for a player who regressed some from '17 to '18 and was shaky in the playoffs. The Red Sox will probably look to re-sign Eovaldi, who excelled after joining the club in a July trade (3.33 ERA, 2.88 FIP).

New York Yankees
Key free agents: LHP Zach Britton, OF Brett Gardner (club option), LHP J.A. Happ, SS Adeiny Hechavarria, RHP Lance Lynn, OF Andrew McCutchen, RHP David Robertson, LHP CC Sabathia, 2B/OF Neil Walker

The Yankees have a busy offseason ahead of them, especially on the pitching side of the ledger. Even if prospect Justus Sheffield is ready to claim a rotation spot behind Luis Severino and Masahiro Tanaka, that still leaves two open starting jobs. Meanwhile, the Yankees' vaunted bullpen could lose two key pieces in Robertson and Britton. Gardner was New York's longest-tenured player in 2018, but the club may pass on his $12.5 million club option ($2 million buyout) after the veteran outfielder posted a .690 OPS this past season.

Tampa Bay Rays
Key free agents: OF Carlos Gomez, RHP Sergio Romo

Romo was an integral member of the Rays' pitching staff for much of the 2018 season, racking up 25 saves and making five appearances as an "opener." However, he recorded a 10.00 ERA in September and will be 36 years old on Opening Day in '19. The cost-conscious Rays may opt to move on and give an opportunity to a younger alternative. As for Gomez, the veteran outfielder is unlikely to be back after posting a .634 OPS over 118 games in 2018.

Toronto Blue Jays
Key free agents: RHP Tyler Clippard, RHP Marco Estrada, 1B Justin Smoak (club option), INF Yangervis Solarte (club option)

Much like Baltimore, Toronto dealt many impending free agents during the 2018 season, including Josh Donaldson, J.A. Happ, Steve Pearce, Curtis Granderson and John Axford. With Rowdy Tellez looking ready for an expanded role at first base, the Jays could pick up Smoak's reasonable $8 million club option and then trade the veteran this offseason. Estrada is likely gone after recording a 5.27 ERA with a 4.97 FIP in 61 starts over the past two years, as the Blue Jays can likely get similar production from a younger and cheaper pitcher.

AL CENTRAL

Chicago White Sox
Key free agents: RHP Jeanmar Gomez, RHP Miguel Gonzalez, RHP Nate Jones (club option), LHP Hector Santiago, RHP James Shields (club option)

The White Sox are close to emerging from their rebuild, and the club could look for more pitching help this offseason, since Michael Kopech is now sidelined for 2019 after undergoing Tommy John surgery. They have a $4.65 million option for Jones that they could exercise, but it seems unlikely that they'd exercise Shields' $16 million club option.

Cleveland Indians
Key free agents: RHP Cody Allen, OF Michael Brantley, OF Melky Cabrera, RHP Carlos Carrasco (club option), OF Lonnie Chisenhall, OF Rajai Davis, 3B Josh Donaldson, OF Brandon Guyer (club option), LHP Andrew Miller, LHP Oliver Perez, IF Adam Rosales, RHP Josh Tomlin

Miller headlines a productive crop of prospective free agents departing Cleveland this season, with outfield and the bullpen being the two areas that stand to be hit hardest by the departures. Allen, Brantley and Miller are eligible for the $17.9 million qualifying offer. The Indians do have some security in the bullpen with midseason acquisitions Brad Hand and Adam Cimber both controllable for several more seasons, but bolstering the relief corps will be an offseason priority for the Tribe, who got subpar seasons from both Allen and Miller in 2018. Outfield is also an area of need, especially if Brantley departs, with no clear-cut starter at any of the three spots entering the offseason.

Detroit Tigers
Key free agents: SS Jose Iglesias, LHP Francisco Liriano, C Jarrod Saltalamacchia

Iglesias, Liriano and the retiring Victor Martinez are the key departures for the rebuilding Tigers, who also dealt impending free agent Mike Fiers to the A's in August. The Tigers will likely be in the market for a shortstop, as they don't have an immediate heir lined up in the event of Iglesias' departure, and will likely look to add to the rotation.

Kansas City Royals
Key free agents: SS Alcides Escobar, RHP Jason Hammel (mutual option), RHP Wily Peralta (club option)

After trading Jon Jay, Lucas Duda, Kelvin Herrera and Mike Moustakas this season, the Royals figure to let Escobar walk, as Adalberto Mondesi is now their starting shortstop. The Royals will almost certainly pay a $2 million buyout to get Hammel off the books instead of exercising his $12 million mutual option for 2019, but they could bring back Peralta, their closer, on a cheaper $3 million team option, especially since they'll likely be looking for bullpen help this offseason.

Minnesota Twins
Key free agents: RHP Matt Belisle, 2B Logan Forsythe, C Chris Gimenez, 1B/DH Joe Mauer, 1B/DH Logan Morrison (club option), RHP Ervin Santana (club option)

The most pressing offseason question for the Twins will be at first base with the possible departure of Mauer to either free agency or retirement and Morrison's disappointing performance in 2018, after which the Twins are not expected to pick up his $8 million option for 2019. The departures of Forsythe, Brian Dozier (traded to Dodgers) and Eduardo Escobar (traded to D-backs) also leave openings in the middle infield for the Twins. The Twins need lots of help in the bullpen and could always use more starting depth, with Santana's option unlikely to be picked up.

AL WEST
Los Angeles Angels
Key free agents: RHP Jim Johnson, RHP Garrett Richards, RHP Junichi Tazawa, OF Chris Young, OF Eric Young Jr., RHP Blake Wood

The Angels will retain much of their core. Johnson will likely draw interest on the open market for clubs in need of dependable bullpen arms. Richards pitched well in 16 starts this season, but will be out of action until 2020 after undergoing Tommy John surgery. Young also suffered a season-ending injury (labral tears in both hips) but is expected to be ready for Spring Training.

Houston Astros
Key free agents: DH Evan Gattis, UTIL Marwin Gonzalez, LHP Dallas Keuchel, C Martin Maldonado, RHP Charlie Morton, LHP Tony Sipp

Keuchel figures to be one of the most sought-after starting pitchers on the market this winter. The 2015 AL Cy Young Award winner has spent his entire career with the Astros, but could anchor another team's staff in 2019. Morton also figures to draw considerable interest coming off his first All-Star season at age 34. Maldonado will be part of a deep class of veteran backstops.

Oakland A's
Key free agents: LHP Brett Anderson, RHP Trevor Cahill, RHP Jeurys Familia, RHP Edwin Jackson, OF Matt Joyce, 2B Jed Lowrie, C Jonathan Lucroy

The A's looming free agents are headlined by a pair of veterans in Lucroy and Lowrie. Lucroy is more likely to return with Franklin Barreto ready to take over as Oakland's everyday second baseman. Joyce is likely the odd man out in a crowded A's outfield. It's unclear if the A's will try to retain any of their veteran starting pitchers.

Seattle Mariners
Key free agents: 2B Gordon Beckham, DH Nelson Cruz, LHP Zach Duke, RHP Hisashi Iwakuma, OF Cameron Maybin, RHP David Phelps, UTIL Andrew Romine, OF Denard Span (mutual option), RHP Adam Warren

Cruz represents the biggest free agent choice for the Mariners this winter. Both sides have expressed interest in a reunion, but Seattle must decide whether it wants to commit to a multi-year deal with the 38-year-old slugger or utilize that money elsewhere, with needs on the pitching staff and in center field. Span has a $12 million mutual option with a $4 million buyout. Iwakuma left the Mariners in September to pursue pitching opportunities in Japan.

Texas Rangers
Key free agents: SS Elvis Andrus (can opt out of his contract), 3B Adrian Beltre, C Robinson Chirinos (club option), RHP Bartolo Colon, RHP Doug Fister (club option), RHP Yovani Gallardo, LHP Matt Moore (club option), LHP Martin Perez (club option)

The Rangers are awaiting Beltre's decision on his baseball future, and if the third baseman opts to continue playing, they could re-sign him. Andrus could opt out of his contract, leaving four years and $58 million on the table, but is more likely to stay put. The Rangers will likely pick up Chirinos' option, and decline their options on Moore and Fister. Perez's option is for $7.5 million and it remains to be seen what Texas will do with the left-hander coming off a down year. Colon and Gallardo aren't expected to return.

Thomas Harrigan is an editor for MLB.com.

Do-Hyoung Park is a reporter for MLB.com based in the Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter at @dohyoungpark.

Chad Thornburg is a reporter for MLB.com based in Los Angeles.

Every club's best individual playoff performance

From MadBum to Mr. October, these runs went down in franchise lore
MLB.com

One of the many joys of baseball's postseason is how one player can make such an outsized difference. There's no better time for a player to go on a hot streak than in the playoffs, when he's able to carry his team for a whole series -- maybe even to a championship. Baseball is a game of ebbs and flows, of zeniths and nadirs, and everyone wants to break out and have a heater in October.

With that in mind, we look at the greatest postseason runs by a player on each of baseball's 30 teams. These are the sort of streaks that make legends in their hometowns ... the sort of runs we'll talk about forever.

One of the many joys of baseball's postseason is how one player can make such an outsized difference. There's no better time for a player to go on a hot streak than in the playoffs, when he's able to carry his team for a whole series -- maybe even to a championship. Baseball is a game of ebbs and flows, of zeniths and nadirs, and everyone wants to break out and have a heater in October.

With that in mind, we look at the greatest postseason runs by a player on each of baseball's 30 teams. These are the sort of streaks that make legends in their hometowns ... the sort of runs we'll talk about forever.

Note: We're sticking to the divisional era here, which goes back to 1969, and is the dawn of the modern postseason.

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Blue Jays: Paul Molitor, 1993
.447/.527/.851, World Series MVP
Everyone remembers the Joe Carter homer, but Molitor was a monster that whole postseason for the Blue Jays at the age of 37. He was terrific back in 1982 for the Brewers, too.

Orioles: Brooks Robinson, 1970
.485/.471/.788, World Series MVP
This was, of course, the same World Series in which he made the ridiculous play at third base … though with Robinson, it's always a question of which ridiculous play.

Video: #WeKnowPostseason: Robinson's Play

Rays: James Shields, 2008
2-2, 25 IP, 2.88 ERA
This is where the "Big Game James" nickname came from, even if it maybe lasted a year or two longer than it should have.

Red Sox: David Ortiz, 2004
.400/.515/.764, ALCS MVP
It's rather difficult, all told, to figure out which Ortiz postseason to pick: He had an OPS over 1.204 in October for all three of the Red Sox championship teams he played for.

Video: 2004 ALCS Gm7: Ortiz's homer gives Red Sox early lead

Yankees: Reggie Jackson, 1978
.417/.511/.806
The highest qualified OPS by Yankees are, in fact, 2018 Aaron Judge and 2006 Derek Jeter ... but how do you not pick Mr. October?

AL CENTRAL

Indians: Orel Hershiser, 1995
4-1, 35 1/3 IP, 1.53 ERA, ALCS MVP
The season with the other Indians' World Series loss -- no, the other one -- featured vintage Hershiser ... and he split a couple of duels with Greg Maddux in the World Series, too.

Royals: Danny Jackson, 1985
2-1, 26 IP, 1.04 ERA
Bret Saberhagen is remembered as the hero of this Royals team -- along with Don Denkinger, of course -- but Jackson was actually the best pitcher for the Royals that postseason.

Tigers: Alan Trammell, 1984
.419/.500/.806, World Series MVP
Trammell put the perfect capper on the Tigers' dream season. This was a quiet argument for Trammell's Hall of Fame candidacy.

Twins: Jack Morris, 1991
4-0, 36 1/3 IP, 2.23 ERA, World Series MVP
Speaking of the Hall of Fame ... this postseason is almost certainly why Morris currently has a plaque in Cooperstown.

Video: 1991 WS Gm7: Morris' 10-inning shutout

White Sox: Jermaine Dye, 2005
.311/.415/.444, World Series MVP
Several White Sox players had a higher OPS than Dye that postseason -- including Joe Crede, Scott Podsednik and Paul Konerko -- but you've got to go with the World Series MVP.

AL WEST

Angels: Francisco Rodriguez, 2002
5-1, 18 2/3 IP, 1.93 ERA
Back when there were more rigid bullpen roles, K-Rod was deployed liberally and devastatingly in 2002, back when he was 20 years old.

Astros: Carlos Beltran, 2004
.435/.536/1.022
Cardinals fans will be having nightmares about 2004 Carlos Beltran for decades to come ... and they won that series.

Video: 2004 NLCS Gm4: Beltran hits eighth homer of playoffs

Athletics: Dave Stewart, 1989
4-0, 32 IP, 2.25 ERA, World Series MVP
Stewart had a career 2.77 postseason ERA in 133 innings ... he would actually win the ALCS MVP the very next season, too.

Mariners: Ken Griffey Jr., 1995
.364/.442/.818
Jay Buhner was just as good as The Kid in 1995 ... but Griffey is Griffey.

Rangers: Juan Gonzalez, 1996
.438/.526/1.375
The Rangers actually lost this Division Series in four games, but good heavens, was Juan Gone ever a monster, hitting five homers in four games.

Video: 1996 ALDS Gm4: Juan Gonzalez's fifth home run of ALDS

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

Braves: John Smoltz, 1996
4-1, 38 IP, 0.95 ERA
You could also go with Greg Maddux's 1995 run -- since the Braves won the World Series that year, after all -- and you wouldn't be wrong.

Marlins: Josh Beckett, 2003
2-2, 42 2/3 IP, 2.11 ERA, World Series MVP
After the Yankees and Red Sox had their first of two epic postseason battles, Beckett was happy to pick up the pieces in the World Series.

Video: WS Gm6: Beckett shuts out Yanks as Marlins win series

Mets: Bobby Ojeda, 1986
2-0, 27 IP, 2.33 ERA
Of all the great Mets starters on that team, it was Ojeda who had the best postseason.

Nationals: Stephen Strasburg, 2017
1-1, 14 IP, 0.00 ERA
Since we're excluding the Expos -- if we weren't, Steve Rogers in 1981 would be the obvious answer here -- we must dig into the gruesome land of the Nationals' postseason failures. Strasburg has the ultimate Nationals playoff line: 0 earned runs, 1 loss.

Video: WSH@CHC Gm4: Strasburg K's 12 over seven scoreless

Phillies: Cliff Lee, 2009
4-0, 40 1/3 IP, 1.56 ERA
Cole Hamels had the World Series MVP in '08, but Lee was actually better, in five more innings.

NL CENTRAL

Brewers: Ryan Braun, 2011
.405/.468/.714
This postseason performance feels like a lifetime ago, but it's one the Brewers sure would appreciate a repeat of.

Cardinals: David Freese, 2011
.397/.465/.794, NLCS MVP, World Series MVP
Freese actually struggled in the NLDS this season ... though he ended up making up for it.

Video: Must C Comeback: Freese's triple ties it up in ninth

Cubs: Jon Lester, 2016
3-1, 35 2/3 IP, 2.02 ERA, NLCS co-MVP
Lester still feels like the postseason starter Cubs fans trust most, and probably always will.

Pirates: Willie Stargell, 1979
.415/.435/.927, NLCS MVP, World Series MVP
He also shared the regular-season MVP Award this year, pulling off the rare trifecta.

Reds: Johnny Bench, 1976
.444/.464/.926, World Series MVP
Bench was as dominant as the Reds were in this matter-of-fact World Series sweep.

NL WEST

D-backs: Curt Schilling, 2001
4-0, 48 1/3 IP, 1.12 ERA, World Series co-MVP
Randy Johnson's line this exact 2001 postseason: 5-1, 41 1/3 IP, 1.52 ERA. That is ... difficult to beat.

Video: WS2001 Gm4: Schilling comes up clutch on short rest

Dodgers: Hershiser, 1988
3-0, 1 SV, 42 2/3 IP, 1.05 ERA, NLCS MVP, World Series MVP
Hershiser is the only pitcher to be on this list twice ... and how could he not be?

Giants: Madison Bumgarner, 2014
4-1, 1 SV, 52 2/3 IP, 1.03 ERA, NLCS MVP, World Series MVP
This is an obvious pick, but at this point I'd like to remind you that Barry Bonds put up a .356/.581/.978 in 2002.

Video: WS2014 Gm7: Bumgarner sets postseason innings record

Padres: Sterling Hitchcock, 1998
3-0, 22 IP, 1.23 ERA, NLCS MVP
He gave up only one earned run in six innings in his lone World Series start ... not that it did the Padres much good.

Rockies: Kaz Matsui, 2007
.304/.347/.500
It was a strange postseason for the Rockies in 2007, but if you forget the World Series happened altogether, it was a glorious one.

Will Leitch is a columnist for MLB.com.

Each team's greatest postseason moment

The most memorable October event of the divisional era for every club
MLB.com

There are just four teams remaining in this year's postseason, but every fan, even those of the Mariners (the team with the longest postseason drought, now up to 17 seasons), can relate to what it feels like to be in the playoffs. The late nights, the constant tension, the stakes so high you can barely breathe ... and when something wonderful happens, the release and the pure, unbridled jubilation.

With that in mind, we take a look at the greatest postseason moments of the division era. Even if your team isn't a postseason team, you can remember your great October moments … and if it is, you can dream of maybe having another one this month that's even better.

There are just four teams remaining in this year's postseason, but every fan, even those of the Mariners (the team with the longest postseason drought, now up to 17 seasons), can relate to what it feels like to be in the playoffs. The late nights, the constant tension, the stakes so high you can barely breathe ... and when something wonderful happens, the release and the pure, unbridled jubilation.

With that in mind, we take a look at the greatest postseason moments of the division era. Even if your team isn't a postseason team, you can remember your great October moments … and if it is, you can dream of maybe having another one this month that's even better.

(For the purpose of this exercise, we are going back to 1969, which is the start of divisional play and the birth of the postseason as we know it.)

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Blue Jays: Joe Carter's World Series walk-off, Oct. 23, 1993
The Blue Jays might not have that many postseason moments, but the greatness of this one more than makes up for that. Runner-up: Jose Bautista's ALDS Game 5 bat flip, Oct. 14, 2015.

Video: 93 WS, GM 6, PHI@TOR: Joe Carter touches them all

Orioles: Brooks Robinson's incredible play, 1970 World Series, Oct. 10, 1970
The best part about this play, which might be the greatest defensive play in World Series history, is how surprised the umpire looks. Even he can't believe what he just saw. Runner-up: David McNally's grand slam, World Series Game 3, Oct. 13, 1970.

Rays: First and only World Series trip clinched, Oct. 19, 2008
A decade ago, and still pretty jaw-dropping that all this happened. Runner-up: Grant Balfour strikes out Ken Griffey Jr. to clinch the first ALDS victory, Oct. 6, 2008.

Red Sox: First World Series title since 1918, Oct. 27, 2004
You might remember when this happened. (It's when lifelong Red Sox fans Jimmy Fallon and Drew Barrymore got on television.) Runner-up: David Ortiz's ALCS grand slam vs. the Tigers sent a cop joyous in the bullpen and turns the series around on Oct. 13, 2013.

Video: Must C Classic: Red Sox win first WS since 1918

Yankees: Reggie Jackson's three homers in 1977 World Series
There's a reason no one else gets to be called "Mr. October." Runner-up: Mr. November -- Derek Jeter's World Series Game 5 walk-off homer on Nov. 1, 2001.

Video: 1977 WS Gm6: Reggie becomes Mr. October

AL CENTRAL

Indians: Eddie Murray's walk-off, Game 3, 1995 World Series, Oct. 24, 1995
It was Cleveland's first World Series game in 41 years, and ended with a Hall of Famer sending the crowd into euphorics. Runner-up: Rajai Davis' home run off Aroldis Chapman, 2016 World Series, Nov. 2, 2016

Royals: Royals win 2015 World Series, Nov. 1, 2015
It was a magical season and a magical World Series that just seems more improbable each year that goes by. Runner-up: The Don Denkinger play, and aftermath, 1985 World Series, Oct. 26, 1985.

Tigers: Magglio Ordonez sends Tigers to World Series, Oct. 14, 2006
The sounds that crowd makes the minute the bat meets the ball still gives you chills 12 years later. Runner-up: Kirk Gibson's Game 5 homer, 1984 World Series.

Twins: Kirby Puckett's Game 6 walk-off, 1991 World Series, Oct. 26, 1991
The original "We Will See You Tomorrow Night." Runner-up: Twins win 1987 World Series, their first in Minnesota, Oct. 25, 1987.

Video: Must C Classic: Puckett crushes a walk-off homer

White Sox: White Sox win 2005 World Series, Oct. 26, 2015
A game that was razor-tight, in a series that was much closer than anyone remembers. Runner-up: Scott Podsednik's Game 2 walk-off, Oct. 23, 2015.

AL WEST

Angels: Scott Spiezio's homer, Game 6, 2002 World Series, Oct. 26, 2002
The most Rally Monkey of all the Rally Monkey moments, his three-run clout cued the rally from a 5-0 deficit. Runner-up: Troy Percival gets last out to win 2002 World Series, Oct. 27, 2002.

Astros: Charlie Morton finishes the Dodgers off, 2017 World Series, Nov. 1, 2017
This was so long ago you might not remember it, but trust me, it was wonderful. Runner-up: Chris Burke sends everybody home after 18 innings, 2005 NLDS.

Video: WS2017 Gm7: Morton induces groundout to close out WS

Athletics: Eck closes out the 1989 World Series, October 28, 1989
When in doubt, go with the Hall of Famer closing out a series for an all-time great team. Runner-up: Joe Rudi's amazing catch, World Series Game 2, Oct. 14, 1973.

Mariners: Ken Griffey Jr. slides home to win the 1995 ALDS, Oct. 8, 1995
Basically, everything wonderful about the history of Mariners baseball, happening in one play. Runner-up: Mariners win most recent postseason series, 2001 ALDS over Cleveland.

Video: Griffey slides home to clinch the ALDS in 1995

Rangers: Neftali Feliz sends Texas to its first World Series, 2010 ALCS, Oct. 22, 2010
Over the hated Yankees, no less. Runner-up: Josh Hamilton's 2011 World Series Game 6 homer, which was this close to being one of the greatest baseball moments of recent memory.

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

Braves: Only World Series win in Atlanta, Oct. 28, 1995
It still seems amazing that this is the only one they ever got. Runner-up: The Sid Bream Slide, Oct. 14, 1992.

Marlins: Edgar Renteria's walk-off to win 1997 World Series, Oct. 26, 1997
Poor Cleveland. Runner-up: The Bartman play, and all that followed, 2003 NLCS.

Video: WS1997 Gm7: Fish win first WS on Renteria's walk-off

Mets: Mookie Wilson reaches base, Ray Knight scores, Mets win on Bill Buckner's error, Game 6, 1986 World Series, Oct. 25, 1986
A Mets comeback for the ages. Runner-up: Miracle Mets win 1969 World Series.

Video: 1986 World Series, Game 6: Red Sox at Mets

Nationals: Jayson Werth's 2012 NLDS walk-off, Oct. 11, 2012
After this, the Nats lost the series. But for the moment, it was great. Runner-up: Strasburg fans 12 to extend last year's NLDS.

Phillies: Brad Lidge gets the last out of a long game, 2008 World Series, Oct. 27, 2008
It took a couple of days for this game to actually finish, but no Phillies fan would ever complain. Runner-up: Roy Halladay's no-hitter, 2010 NLDS against Cincinnati.

NL CENTRAL

Brewers: Paul Molitor's inside-the-park homer, 1982 ALCS, Oct. 6, 1982
Runner-up: Nyjer Morgan's walk-off over Arizona in 2011 NLDS, particularly when called by Bob Uecker.

Cardinals: David Freese's triple to tie 2011 World Series Game 6, Oct. 27, 2011
The walk-off homer in the 11th gets more air time, but this was truly one of the most insane hits in World Series history. Runner-up: Ozzie Smith's 1985 NLCS homer off Tom Niedenfuer, the "Go Crazy, Folks" moment.

Video: WS2011 Gm6: Freese saves the Cards with a huge triple

Cubs: History in 2016
This was … not a tough call. Runner-up: Kyle Schwarber's shot atop the Wrigley scoreboard, Game 4, 2015 NLDS.

Video: Cubs win first World Series title in 108 years

Pirates: Willie Stargell's homer, 1979 World Series, Game 7, Oct. 17, 1979
And to do it in such beautiful threadsRunner-up: Pirates fans scare Johnny Cueto into dropping the ball, 2013 NL Wild Card Game at PNC Park.

Reds: Big Red Machine wins a Fall Classic for the ages, Oct. 22, 1975
It's only East Coast Bias that makes you think of Carlton Fisk when you think of this series. Runner-up: Reds sweep heavily favored A's in 1990 World Series.

NL WEST

D-backs: Luis Gonzalez off Mariano Rivera, 2001 World Series, Nov. 4, 2001
Ah, the perils of playing the infield in … Runner-up: Tony Womack's hit in 2001 NLDS.

Video: Must C Classic: Gonzalez walks off, wins World Series

Dodgers: Kirk Gibson pulls himself around the bases, 1988 World Series
Runner-up: Juan Uribe's 2013 go-ahead homer in Game 4 NLDS against Atlanta.

Video: Must C Classic: Gibson's 1988 WS walk-off home run

Giants: First World Series win in San Francisco, 2010 World Series, Nov. 1, 2010
Edgar Renteria hit .412 with two homers and six RBIs and the city got its first celebration. Runner-up: Madison Bumgarner's dominance in 2014 World Series.

Padres: Tony Gwynn's bad hop double, 1984 NLCS, Game 5, Oct. 7, 1984
The biggest hit of Gwynn's career was a bizarre one, but it got the job done. Runner-up: Padres finish off Braves to win 1998 NLCS.

Rockies: The Holliday slide, Oct. 1, 2007
He touched the plate … well, eventually. Maybe not technically the postseason either, but it came after Game 162. Runner-up: Rockies sweep D-backs to reach 2007 World Series.

Will Leitch is a columnist for MLB.com.

Here's what happened in Tuesday's AFL action

MLB.com

Here's a team-by-team breakdown of how all 30 teams' prospects fared in Arizona Fall League action on Tuesday:

• Gameday: Salt River 2, Mesa 1 | Scottsdale 6, Glendale 1 | Surprise 8, Peoria 16

Here's a team-by-team breakdown of how all 30 teams' prospects fared in Arizona Fall League action on Tuesday:

• Gameday: Salt River 2, Mesa 1 | Scottsdale 6, Glendale 1 | Surprise 8, Peoria 16

AL East

Blue Jays (Surprise)
No. 1 overall prospect Vladimir Guerrero Jr. continued to rake, going 3-for-4 with a double, three RBIs and a walk for Surprise. Guerrero also stole his first base of the Fall League season. Santiago Espinal (Blue Jays' No. 22 prospect) went 0-for-3 with two walks, a run scored and a stolen base. Zach Jackson allowed three runs on one hit and two walks with one strikeout in two-thirds of an inning of relief.

2018 Arizona Fall League rosters

Orioles (Glendale)
Martin Cervenka went 1-for-3 with a double and a walk for Glendale. Steve Wilkerson went 1-for-4 from the leadoff spot.

Rays (Peoria)
Rays No. 9 prospect Lucius Fox went 2-for-5 with an RBI, a walk and two runs scored out of the leadoff spot for Peoria. Phoenix Sanders tossed 1 1/3 scoreless innings of relief, allowing one hit and two walks with one strikeout.

Red Sox (Mesa)
Red Sox No. 6 prospect Bobby Dalbec drove in a run, his fifth AFL RBI, as part of a 2-for-3 night.

Yankees (Glendale)
Yankees No. 2 prospect Estevan Florial went 0-for-3 with a walk and scored Glendale's lone run. Steven Sensley went 0-for-3 with a walk. Matt Wivinis tossed two scoreless innings of relief, allowing one hit and one walk with one strikeout. Hobie Harris allowed one run on one hit and one walk in one inning of relief.

AL Central

Indians (Glendale)
Indians No. 6 prospect Yu Chang went 1-for-4 with a single for Glendale. Connor Marabell went 0-for-4. Dalbert Siri pitched a scoreless inning of relief, issuing one walk.

Royals (Peoria)
Royals No. 2 prospect Khalil Lee went 2-for-5 with a two-run homer, his first long ball of the Fall League season, and a double for Surprise. Nick Heath went 3-for-4 with two walks, two runs scored and three stolen bases out of the leadoff spot. Meibrys Viloria went 0-for-4 with a walk.

Tigers (Mesa)
Tigers No. 14 prospect Gregory Soto got the start for Mesa and gave up one run on five hits over four innings. Daniel Pinero went 1-for-3.

Twins (Salt River)
Twins No. 18 prospect Travis Blankenhorn drew a walk, but was otherwise 0-for-3. Adam Bray threw an inning in relief and gave up one run on two hits. Hector Lujan fared a bit better as he threw a frame and retired the side in order. Devin Smeltzer took the mound next and gave up one hit in a scoreless inning.

White Sox (Glendale)
White Sox No. 9 prospect Luis Alexander Basabe went 1-for-4 with a single for Glendale. Zach Thompson allowed three unearned runs on two hits in an inning of relief. Luis Robert (No. 4) got the day off.

AL West

A's (Mesa)
Athletics No. 30 prospect Skye Bolt put together a strong night at the plate as he went 2-for-4 with a triple. Eli White (No. 18) went 0-for-2.

Angels (Mesa)
Angels No. 4 prospect Jahmai Jones went hitless (0-for-4), while Daniel Procopio threw two scoreless innings and gave up two hits.

Astros (Scottsdale)
Astros No. 2 prospect Forrest Whitley tossed four innings and notched his first win of the Fall League season for Scottsdale. The right-hander allowed one unearned run on two hits and a walk, striking out six. Ronnie Dawson went 1-for-4 with an RBI double. Drew Ferguson went 0-for-3 with an RBI. Erasmo Pinales tossed a scoreless inning, walking two and striking out one. More »

Video: Forrest Whitley on great start in Fall League

Mariners (Peoria)
Mariners No. 20 prospect Ian Miller hit a go-ahead, three-run home run for Peoria, finishing 1-for-3 with three RBIs, two walks and two runs scored. Evan White (No. 2) went 1-for-5 with two RBIs and a walk. Chris Mariscal went 3-for-5 with a triple, two RBIs and two runs scored. Matt Walker allowed three runs on one hit and three walks in one-third of an inning. More »

Video: Ian Miller on his homer, win in Fall League

Rangers (Surprise)
Yanio Perez went 2-for-6 with two RBIs out of the cleanup spot for Surprise. Julio Pablo Martinez (Rangers' No. 2 prospect) went 1-for-4 with two walks, a run scored and a stolen base. Joe Barlow struck out the only batter he faced in relief.

NL East

Braves (Peoria)
Braves No. 12 prospect Kyle Muller notched his first win of the Fall League season for Peoria, tossing two scoreless innings of relief. He allowed one hit and one walk while striking out three. Cristian Pache (No. 6) went 3-for-6 with two doubles and two runs scored out of the cleanup spot. Braxton Davidson went 1-for-2 with three walks and three runs scored.

Marlins (Salt River)
Marlins No. 26 prospect Bryson Brigman picked up a pair of his and went 2-for-4 out of the leadoff spot for Salt River. Brian Miller (No. 11) also got a hit and finished 1-for-3. Monte Harrison (No. 1) went 0-for-3, but reached once via a walk.

Mets (Scottsdale)
Mets No. 2 prospect Peter Alonso hit his second home run of the Fall League season for Scottsdale. He also doubled, drove in two runs and scored a pair, finishing 2-for-3. Ali Sanchez (No. 25) started at catcher and went 0-for-4. Matt Blackham pitched a perfect sixth inning and Joe Zanghi pitched a perfect seventh, each notching a strikeout.

Nationals (Salt River)
Nationals No. 23 prospect Luis Reyes tossed five scoreless innings of two-hit ball while giving up just two walks and striking out three. Reyes, who arguably has the best stuff in Washington's system but has struggled with command, also struck out three. Tres Barrera (No. 15) went 2-for-4.

Phillies (Scottsdale)
Phillies No. 11 prospect Arquimedes Gamboa went 1-for-2 with two walks and a run scored for Scottsdale. Luke Williams went 0-for-3 with a walk, an RBI and a run scored.

NL Central

Brewers (Peoria)
Brewers No. 1 prospect Keston Hiura (No. 30 overall) had a huge day for Peoria, going 3-for-5 with a home run, a triple, five RBIs, a walk and two runs scored. Hiura also made a nice defensive play during the sixth inning, using his glove to scoop a ground ball to first base for an out. Trent Grisham (Milwaukee's No. 19) went 0-for-3 with an RBI, two walks and a run scored. Mario Feliciano (No. 23) started at catcher and went 0-for-1. Bubba Derby got the start and allowed four runs on seven hits and three walks with three strikeouts in 3 2/3 innings.

Cardinals (Surprise)
Evan Kruczynski started for Surprise, tossing 3 2/3 scoreless innings with three hits allowed, three walks and three strikeouts. Conner Greene (Cardinals' No. 27 prospect) took the loss, allowing six runs on five hits and two walks in two-thirds of an inning of relief. Will Latcham allowed five runs on three hits and three walks in one-third of an inning of relief.

Cubs (Mesa)
Cubs No. 16 prospect D.J. Wilson was 0-for-4, as was Jhonny Pereda. Bailey Clark fired two perfect innings and struck out a pair in the process.

Pirates (Surprise)
Pirates No. 5 prospect Cole Tucker went 1-for-3 with two walks, an RBI and a run scored for Surprise. Bryan Reynolds (No. 9) went 0-for-3 with two walks, a run scored and a stolen base. Blake Weiman tossed 1 1/3 scoreless innings of relief, allowing two hits and striking out one. Matt Eckelman allowed two runs on two hits and one walk in one inning of relief.

Reds (Scottsdale)
Reds prospects Taylor Trammell (No. 3) and Shed Long (No. 8) each notched a single for Scottsdale. Alfredo Rodriguez went 2-for-4 with a run scored, while Trammell also scored a run. Ty Boyles tossed a scoreless inning of relief, allowing one hit and striking out two.

NL West

D-backs (Salt River)
Pavin Smith, the D-backs' No. 4 prospect, went 1-for-4, but the hit was a go-ahead single in the top of the ninth. Drew Ellis (No. 9) went 0-for-4.

Dodgers (Glendale)
Ben Holmes started for Glendale and allowed two runs on four hits and one walk with three strikeouts. It was Holmes' first loss of the Fall League season. Errol Robinson (Dodgers' No. 20 prospect) went 0-for-3. Jared Walker went 0-for-3 with a walk.

Giants (Scottsdale)
Chase Johnson tossed a scoreless inning of relief for Scottsdale, allowing one hit and one walk.

Padres (Peoria)
Padres No. 25 prospect Austin Allen entered as a pinch-hitter for Peoria and went 2-for-2 with an RBI, a walk and two runs scored. Travis Radke allowed one run on two hits and three walks with four strikeouts in 1 2/3 innings of relief.

Rockies (Salt River)
Josh Fuentes went 1-for-4 at the plate, while Sam Hilliard, the Rockies No. 9 prospect, went 2-for-4 and continued his fast start in the AFL. Justin Lawrence (No. 17) picked up the save and struck out two in his inning of work. More »

Orioles moving on from Showalter, Duquette

MLB.com

BALTIMORE -- The Orioles are headed in a new direction, as the club officially announced on Wednesday night that neither manager Buck Showalter nor executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette will continue with the organization. The contracts for both men conclude at the end of the month.

In a release, the club also announced plans to hire an executive from outside the organization to replace Duquette. In the interim, director of player development Brian Graham will oversee baseball operations. Graham, vice president of baseball operations Brady Anderson and director of scouting Gary Rajsich currently remain under contract with the club.

BALTIMORE -- The Orioles are headed in a new direction, as the club officially announced on Wednesday night that neither manager Buck Showalter nor executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette will continue with the organization. The contracts for both men conclude at the end of the month.

In a release, the club also announced plans to hire an executive from outside the organization to replace Duquette. In the interim, director of player development Brian Graham will oversee baseball operations. Graham, vice president of baseball operations Brady Anderson and director of scouting Gary Rajsich currently remain under contract with the club.

The partnership of Duquette and Showalter, while often a rocky one, brought the Orioles three postseason trips over a five-year stretch. But things soured quickly after 2016's American League Wild Card loss, and the O's went 47-115 this year, the worst mark in club history.

Showalter arrived first, taking the helm in August of 2010 after the team fired Dave Trembley and promoted Juan Samuel to interim manager. Duquette was hired to replace Andy MacPhail in November of 2011 after nine years away from the game. The new duo led Baltimore to its first non-losing season in 14 years in 2012, as the O's won the AL Wild Card Game against Texas before falling in the Division Series to the Yankees.

Both were extended in 2013, Showalter signing a five-year contract and Duquette extending his contract four years to run concurrent with the manager.

Duquette became known for under-the-radar pickups like pitchers Miguel Gonzalez and a one-year deal for Nelson Cruz, both key components in the 2014 American League East-winning team, and Showalter deftly navigated an impressive bullpen that season.

The O's reached the AL Championship Series that year without All-Stars Manny Machado, Chris Davis or Matt Wieters. Showalter won the 2014 AL Manager of the Year and Duquette took home the Sporting News Executive of the Year Award.

"Everyone in Birdland and across our organization will cherish these memories, and we all join in thanking Dan and Buck for their contributions," team spokesman Greg Bader said in a club statement.

"As we look forward to the next chapter of Orioles baseball, we are grateful for the ongoing support of our fans. While this year has been a challenge, the organization is determined to grow and change in ways that will ultimately lead us back to the postseason."

Showalter brought an air of accountability to a long-beleaguered franchise, though the club's staple -- a standout bullpen and exceptional defense -- waned over the past few years. Many believe that Showalter's slip-up in the Wild Card loss in '16, when he failed to use All-Star closer Zach Britton in a loss in Toronto, was the beginning of his demise.

For Duquette, who entertained a job offer with Toronto prior to the 2015 season, there were missteps as well. Notable is the trade of right-hander Jake Arrieta (with reliever Pedro Strop) to the Chicago Cubs in July 2013. Smaller signings, like outfielder Travis Snider, and the failure to re-sign outfielders Nick Markakis and Cruz after the '14 season, have also loomed large.

Duquette kickstarted the Orioles rebuild this summer, trading Machado, Britton, Kevin Gausman, Jonathan Schoop and Darren O'Day. He spoke of the team's three-year plan at the time and the need to build up analytics and scouting. That will now fall on someone else.

Duquette, whose first GM job was with the Montreal Expos in 1991, spent eight years with the Brewers to start his career. He was with Boston (1994-2002) and is credited with helping to architect some of the Red Sox's World Series winning '04 club.

Showalter finishes 669-684 with the Orioles, a winning percentage of .494. His career record is 1,551-1,517, a .506 winning percentage.

Showalter was the third oldest manager in the Majors, behind the Cubs' Joe Maddon and the Giants' Bruce Bochy. This season was his 20th as a big league manager, including four with the Yankees, three with the D-backs and four with the Rangers. This year's team was his first to lose 100 or more games.

Brittany Ghiroli has covered the Orioles for MLB.com since 2010. Follow her on Facebook and Twitter @britt_ghiroli, and listen to her podcast.

Baltimore Orioles

30 top prospects in the AFL -- 1 from each team

MLB.com

The Arizona Fall League has long been a haven for the best prospects in all of baseball to come together and put the finishing touches on their development on the way to the big leagues. This year is no different, with 15 players from MLB Pipeline's Top 100 prospects list slated to play starting on Tuesday.

Seven clubs are sending their No. 1 prospect to the AFL, and each team is sending an impressive array of up-and-coming talent. Here is a list of the top prospect from each organization that fans can check out in AFL action next week.

The Arizona Fall League has long been a haven for the best prospects in all of baseball to come together and put the finishing touches on their development on the way to the big leagues. This year is no different, with 15 players from MLB Pipeline's Top 100 prospects list slated to play starting on Tuesday.

Seven clubs are sending their No. 1 prospect to the AFL, and each team is sending an impressive array of up-and-coming talent. Here is a list of the top prospect from each organization that fans can check out in AFL action next week.

AL East

Blue Jays: Vladimir Guerrero Jr., 3B (TOR No. 1; MLB No. 1)
Guerrero, the top prospect in this year's Fall League, batted .381 with 20 homers, 78 RBIs and more walks (42) than strikeouts (38) at 19 this season while ascending to Triple-A. He'll need to improve his defense at the hot corner to avoid a move down the positional spectrum, but it's a generational-type bat capable of shattering records this fall en route to a 2019 big league debut.

Orioles: Ryan McKenna, CF (BAL No. 12)
McKenna, 21, led all Orioles farmhands in average (.315), OBP (.410), hits (148) and runs scored (95) while splitting his season between Class A Advanced Frederick and Double-A Bowie. The 2015 fourth-rounder swung the bat particularly well in the Florida State League, hitting .377/.467/.556 with 97 hits over 67 games, and impressed with his center-field defense at both stops.

Rays: Lucius Fox, SS (TB No. 9)
The speedster Fox performed well in the Florida State League but scuffled during the final month of the season in Double-A after celebrating his 21st birthday. He ultimately posted a .692 OPS with 29 stolen bases across the two levels. In 2017, Fox finished with a .691 OPS and 30 steals.

Red Sox: Michael Chavis, 3B/1B (BOS No. 1; MLB No. 69)
After Chavis ranked third in the Minors with 68 extra-base hits and fifth with 31 homers last year, he missed the first 80 games of 2018 with a suspension for testing positive for a performance-enhancing substance during the offseason. When he returned, he batted .298/.391/.538 (mostly in Double-A) to continue to establish himself as one of the best power-hitting prospects in the game. His strong arm is an asset at third base.

Yankees: Estevan Florial, OF (NYY No. 2; MLB No. 45)
Florial played in Fall League a year ago, batting .286/.383/.414 for the Scottsdale Scorpions, and returns after losing half of the 2018 season to a right hamate injury. He has one of the highest ceilings in the league as a potential 30-30 player who can handle center field. Florial has well above-average raw power, speed and arm strength, though he'll have to prove he can make consistent contact at the plate.

2018 Arizona Fall League rosters

AL Central

Indians: Yu Chang, SS (CLE No. 6)
Spending his age-22 season with Triple-A Columbus, Chang produced a .256/.330/.411 line with 13 home runs while playing the bulk of his 127 games as a shortstop. He's improved defensively in every season and committed just nine errors in 94 games at short with Columbus. Now 23, Chang is back in Fall League this year after hitting .304 over 15 games with Mesa in 2017.

Royals: Khalil Lee, OF (KC No. 2)
Though Lee intrigued clubs as a high school left-hander with a low-90s fastball and a promising slider, the Royals preferred him as an outfielder and made him a full-time position player after taking him in 2016's third round. He has a chance to have solid or better tools across the board -- his arm strength is his best attribute -- and displays some of the best patience in Kansas City's system as well as the ability to fit anywhere in the outfield.

Tigers: Daz Cameron, OF (DET No. 8)
When the Tigers got Cameron from the Astros as part of the Justin Verlander trade late last season, he had turned in what looked like a breakout season. He kept it going in his first year with Detroit, playing across three levels and reaching Triple-A at age 21. Cameron was particularly strong during his Double-A stint with a .285/.367/.470 line to go along with 12 steals in 53 games.

Twins: Brent Rooker, OF (MIN No. 7)
After a stunning first summer of pro ball that saw Rooker reach the Florida State League and hit 18 homers in 62 games, any encore was bound to seem like a disappointment. Yes, the strikeout rate (26.4 pct) was a bit high, but he spent his first full season in Double-A and led the system in homers (22) and finished third in RBIs (79).

White Sox: Luis Robert, OF (CWS No. 4; MLB No. 44)
Shortly before international signing rules drastically changed, the White Sox spent $52 million ($26 million bonus, matching amount as a penalty for exceeding their bonus pool) in May 2017 to land Robert. Damaged ligaments in his left thumb limited him to 50 games this summer, but Robert's five-tool potential was obvious. He has electric bat speed, well above-average foot speed and the range and arm strength to play anywhere in the outfield.

AL West

A's: Eli White, INF (OAK No. 18)
White is coming off the season of his career as he hit .308/.388/.450 over 130 games with Double-A Midland. The 24-year-old, an 11th-round pick from the 2016 Draft, came up as a shortstop but added second and third base to his resume this season. In addition to the defensive versatility, White also showed some increased power this season as he hit nine homers, more than double his previous career high of four.

Angels: Jahmai Jones, OF (LAA No. 4)
Things didn't exactly go according to plan for Jones in his third full season of pro ball, as he saw his batting average and OPS drop considerably from 2017. On the plus side, his walk rate did go up, and he reached double digits in home runs (10) and steals (24) while reaching Double-A before his 21st birthday. Jones did all that while making the transition from the outfield to second base.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

Astros: Forrest Whitley, RHP (HOU No. 2; MLB No. 8)
MLBPipeline's highest-rated pitching prospect, Whitley worked just 26 1/3 innings this season because of a 50-game suspension for violating the Minor League drug program and oblique and lat injuries. When he did take the mound, Whitley continued to show the ability to miss bats with four pitches: a lively mid-90s fastball, a 12-to-6 curveball, a power slider and a fading changeup.

Mariners: Evan White, 1B (SEA No. 2)
The Mariners' 2017 first-rounder was a force during the second half as he slashed .320/.400/.512 with eight home runs, 16 doubles and 40 RBIs over his final 64 games in the California League. He's yet to hit for much power, but there's a lot to like in White's ability to hit for average and get on base in addition to his near-elite defense at first base.

Rangers: Julio Pablo Martinez, OF (TEX No. 2; MLB No. 56)
When the Rangers failed to sign Shohei Ohtani, they used their surplus international bonus pool money to sign Martinez for $2.8 million in March. He's a well above-average runner who plays a fine center field, and he has more power than a typical 174-pounder thanks to his bat speed and strong hands and wrists. Unlike most Fall League players, Martinez has yet to play in a full-season league after spending most of his pro debut at short-season Spokane.

NL East

Braves: Cristian Pache, OF (ATL No. 6; MLB No. 68)
After taking a big step forward offensively in the Florida State League (.285/.311/.431), Pache earned a promotion to Double-A at age 19 in August. He held his own, especially at the outset, but finished the season 1-for-22. One of the best defensive outfield prospects in the game, a stint in Fall League will help Pache hit the ground running back in Double-A in 2018.

Marlins: Monte Harrison, OF (MIA No. 1)
The tooled-up Harrison improved his stock as much as any player in last year's Fall League, showing a power-speed combo that ultimately led to him being acquired from the Brewers in the offseason Christian Yelich trade. It was on display again in the 22-year-old's first Double-A campaign, as Harrison totaled 19 homers and 28 steals but also struck out in 36.9 percent of his plate appearances.

Mets: Andres Gimenez, SS (NYM No. 1; MLB No. 55)
The Mets don't shy away from pushing their young players aggressively, and Gimenez has responded, reaching Double-A before he turned 20 and putting up his best offensive numbers (.281/.347/.409) stateside. The 2018 Futures Gamer is a tremendous defender at a premium position, and while he likely will never have a ton of pop, he's starting to grow into more extra-base thump at the plate.

Nationals: Carter Kieboom, SS (WAS No. 2; MLB No. 39)
Keiboom was plagued by injuries during his first full season but put it all together this year to reach the Double-A level at age 20. Playing in 123 games across two levels, the 2016 first-round pick hit .280/.357/.444 with 16 home runs and 31 doubles.

Phillies: Arquimedes Gamboa, SS (PHI No. 11; MLB No. 21)
The Phillies have pushed Gamboa aggressively since signing him for $900,000 out of Venezuela in 2014, sending him to high Class A as a 20-year-old this season. Though he batted just .214/.304/.279, he's still a quality defender with good patience and promising power potential for a middle infielder.

NL Central

Brewers: Keston Hiura, 2B (MIL No. 1; MLB No. 30)
The best pure hitter in the 2017 Draft lived up to his reputation in his first full season by hitting .291 with 13 homers and 33 doubles while reaching Double-A in his first full season. The Brewers already have the 22-year-old second baseman on the fast track to the Major Leagues, and the hope is that he'll get a jumpstart on the 2019 season with a productive campaign in Fall League. Hiura also stands to benefit from additional work at second base after lingering issues with his throwing elbow limited him to DH duties for the first month-plus this season.

Cardinals: Conner Greene, RHP (STL No. 27)
In his first season with the Cardinals after coming over from the Blue Jays in the Randal Grichuk trade, Greene was so-so as a starter in Double-A. He improved somewhat with a move to the bullpen and a bump up to Triple-A and has the power repertoire to excel in that role. Greene'll continue to work on the transition to relief in Fall League while hoping to improve his command (6.4 BB/9 in 2018).

Cubs: Nico Hoerner, SS (CHC No. 6)
The Cubs' first-round pick (24th overall) in June, Hoerner is the top 2018 Draft pick playing in Arizona. Though he played just 14 games in his pro debut before straining ligaments in his left elbow while diving for a ball, that was long enough to show why scouts considered him one of the best offensive-minded middle infielders available. Hoerner has exceptional hand-eye coordination, an advanced approach and developing power.

Pirates: Cole Tucker, SS (PIT No. 5)
A broken thumb kept Tucker, an Arizona native, from attending Fall League a year ago, but now he's ready to go. The tall and athletic shortstop tied for the system lead in stolen bases with 35, his third year of 25 or more steals. Tucker was swinging a hot bat at the end of the season, including hitting a pair of playoff homers for Double-A Altoona.

Reds: Taylor Trammell, OF (CIN No. 3; MLB No. 17)
The Futures Game MVP has all the tools needed to be an elite-level player and finished third in the organization with 25 steals despite missing some time with a concussion in August. Trammell has an advanced approach at the plate (career .372 OBP) and is still learning to tap into his power. The 21-year-old could see time in all three outfield spots this fall.

NL West

D-backs: Jon Duplantier, RHP (ARI No. 1; MLB No. 80)
Durability concerns coming out of Rice forced Duplantier down to the third round of the 2016 Draft, but he answered those questions with a huge first full season across two levels and a trip to the Futures Game. While he pitched well in 2018, biceps tendinitis forced him out for nearly two months, so the right-hander is making up for lost innings in Fall League.

Dodgers: Keibert Ruiz, C (LAD No. 2; MLB No. 39)
One of the game's best catching prospects, Ruiz held his own offensively this year as the second-youngest regular (age 19 for most of the season) in the Double-A Texas League. He's a switch-hitter with advanced feel for the barrel and developing power, with most of his home runs coming as a left-hander. Ruiz is improving defensively and could become a solid receiver with arm strength to match.

Giants: Heath Quinn, OF (SF No. 10)
The second-highest pick (third round) in Samford history behind only Phil Ervin, Quinn has a similar offensive profile but has had difficulty staying healthy in pro ball. Hamate and shoulder injuries affected his first full pro season, while a hamstring strain sidelined him for a month in 2018. He drives the ball to all fields and has deceptive athleticism for a 6-foot-3, 220-pounder, showing solid speed once he gets going.

Padres: Buddy Reed, OF (SD No. 13)
The 2016 second-rounder struggled in his first pro season but rebounded in 2018 to hit .271 with 48 extra-base hits and 51 steals in 122 games between two levels including Double-A. The 6-foot-4, 210-pounder boasts some of the best tools in this year's Fall League, though questions remain about his hitting ability.

Rockies: Sam Hilliard, OF (COL No. 9)
First drafted by the Twins as a left-handed pitcher out of Crowder (Mo.) JC in 2014, Hilliard signed as an outfielder after a year at Wichita State in 2015. He's still somewhat raw at the plate, but Rockies officials once likened him to Larry Walker because he's a tooled-up right fielder who bats from the left side. Hilliard has plus raw power, speed and arm strength, giving him 20-20 potential and the ability to play anywhere in the outfield.