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Tatis notches 2 hits, SB, run in Futures Game

Padres' top prospect robbed of another hit by teammate Reed
MLB.com

WASHINGTON -- Fernando Tatis Jr. at short, Luis Urias at second. That's the way the San Diego Padres hope to line 'em up one day at Petco Park, and that's the alignment the World Team utilized up the middle for the start of the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game on Sunday at Nationals Park.

The results were mixed, but the experience for both young players was special. Tatis played the entirety of the 10-6 loss to the U.S. squad, contributing a pair of hits, a stolen base and a run scored. Urias, meanwhile, went 0-for-2 and had the misfortune of being hit between the left elbow and forearm by a 100.4 mph fastball from Hunter Greene in the fourth inning, but he came out unscathed.

WASHINGTON -- Fernando Tatis Jr. at short, Luis Urias at second. That's the way the San Diego Padres hope to line 'em up one day at Petco Park, and that's the alignment the World Team utilized up the middle for the start of the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game on Sunday at Nationals Park.

The results were mixed, but the experience for both young players was special. Tatis played the entirety of the 10-6 loss to the U.S. squad, contributing a pair of hits, a stolen base and a run scored. Urias, meanwhile, went 0-for-2 and had the misfortune of being hit between the left elbow and forearm by a 100.4 mph fastball from Hunter Greene in the fourth inning, but he came out unscathed.

Box score

"It wasn't fun, seeing that fastball coming at me," Urias said. "I got scared a little bit. I was glad to be wearing an elbow pad."

:: 2018 Futures Game coverage ::

More than anything, both players were glad to share this experience together. These are two of the more highly regarded prospects not just in the loaded San Diego system but in the game at large. Urias is listed by MLB Pipeline as the No. 29 overall prospect in the game, while Tatis is listed at No. 3, making him the highest-rated prospect to take place in this year's Futures Game.

"I would say it's motivation to us to keep working and hopefully one day be at Petco Park turning double plays with Tatis," Urias said.

Urias could be knocking on the door to the big leagues as soon as this season, as he's spent the entirety of 2018 at Triple-A El Paso (.278/.391/.411 slash). Tatis is a little further off, plying his trade at Double-A San Antonio (.289/.359/.509), but his performance on this stage against fellow young, elite talents was a window into what makes him such a tantalizing talent. Facing Greene, the No. 2 overall pick by the Reds from the 2017 Draft, Tatis ripped a sharp line-drive single on a fastball measured by Statcast™ at 102.3 mph.

"That guy's not human," Tatis joked of Greene. "He's on another level. Maybe I got lucky or something, but he should be in The Show soon."

Video: WLD@USA: Manning strikes out Urias in the 5th inning

Tatis' line in the box score would have looked even better had he not been robbed of an extra-base hit by none other than fellow Friars prospect and San Antonio teammate Buddy Reed on a nice running catch.

"When he stopped between first and second," said Reed, "I just started laughing."

Added Tatis: "I don't know, maybe he forgot we're teammates. But I'm going to let him remember he's the new guy in Double-A. So he's going to pay for it!"

Video: WLD@USA: Reed wired up, makes great grab at the wall

Tatis will head back to Double-A and Urias to Triple-A, but it might not be long before they're paired in the middle infield of a big league diamond again.

"This has been amazing," Tatis said of the Futures Game experience. "We have a great bond. If we get to play together, it's going to be awesome."

Anthony Castrovince has been a reporter for MLB.com since 2004. Read his columns, listen to his podcast and follow him on Twitter at @Castrovince.

San Diego Padres, Fernando Tatis Jr.

Padres finalize deal for 2nd-round pick Edwards

High school shortstop among handful of signings made Tuesday
MLB.com

ST. LOUIS -- The Padres were close to finalizing deals with a handful of their top Draft picks on Tuesday, including No. 38 overall selection Xavier Edwards.

The club has not yet confirmed the signings.

View Full Game Coverage

ST. LOUIS -- The Padres were close to finalizing deals with a handful of their top Draft picks on Tuesday, including No. 38 overall selection Xavier Edwards.

The club has not yet confirmed the signings.

View Full Game Coverage

Edwards, a high school shortstop from Florida, received a $2.6 million signing bonus, well over slot value of approximately $1.9 million, according to MLB Pipeline's Jim Callis.

In his senior season at North Broward High School, Edwards batted .406/.532/.646. A 5-foot-10 switch-hitter, Edwards boasts elite speed and defense tools, and he's an on-base threat at the plate.

"He's a guy that we had as one of the more advanced high-school bats in terms of plate discipline, seeing pitches, doing the things you want to see from good leadoff hitters," Padres general manager A.J. Preller said on Draft day. "... We see him as a middle-infield, top-of-the-order guy that's got a dynamic skill set."

Video: Draft Report: Xavier Edwards, HS shortstop

Also on Tuesday, Callis reported that the Padres agreed with third-rounder Owen Miller ($500,000), fourth-rounder Dylan Coleman ($500,000) and fifth-rounder Dwanya Williams-Sutton ($350,000). MLB Pipeline's Jonathan Mayo added the signings of sixth-rounder Alexuan Vega ($250,000) and seventh-rounder Juwuan Harris ($215,000).

Padres Day 2 Draft breakdown

All five of those signings checked in under the value of their assigned slots. Thus far, the Padres have reportedly spent $4,415,000 on those six Draft picks. Those pick values correspond with a combined $3,734,900. They're going to have to save money elsewhere in their $10 million-plus overall pool.

The Padres have not yet agreed to a deal with left-hander Ryan Weathers, the No. 7 overall selection in the Draft. They have until July 6 to do so. The assigned value of Weathers' slot is worth just over $5.2 million.

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

San Diego Padres

Weathers latest in Padres' stable of LHPs

Organization boasts several talented lefty arms; Guilbe a high-upside reach on Day 3; Preller likes multi-sport athletes
MLB.com

SAN DIEGO -- Before this week's Draft, the Padres already boasted the top contingent of left-handed pitching prospects in baseball. And then they added Ryan Weathers in the first round.

• Every Padres pick

SAN DIEGO -- Before this week's Draft, the Padres already boasted the top contingent of left-handed pitching prospects in baseball. And then they added Ryan Weathers in the first round.

• Every Padres pick

The 18-year-old southpaw out of Loretto High joins a group of immensely talented lefties in the Padres' system -- from the top down. Already this season, Joey Lucchesi and Eric Lauer have reached the big leagues. But according to MLB Pipeline, they were only the fourth- and fifth-best left-handed prospects entering the year.

• Padres Top 30 prospects

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

Atop that list is MacKenzie Gore, the No. 3 overall selection in the 2017 Draft. Adrian Morejon -- San Diego's No. 6 ranked prospect -- got off to a rough start at Class A Advanced this season, but he owns a 2.34 ERA over the past month. Logan Allen, meanwhile, has been excellent for Double-A San Antonio. He pitched seven innings of a combined no-hitter this week and owns a 3.24 ERA.

Now the Padres have Weathers, too. Taken with the seventh overall selection on Monday night, Weathers posted absurd numbers in his senior season at Loretto High. He pitched 76 innings, struck out 148 hitters and allowed only one earned run.

Make no mistake: The organizational push toward left-handers wasn't a coincidence.

"Dating back to 2015, that year we definitely learned a valuable lesson," said Padres general manager A.J. Preller. "At the big league level, Frank Garces was probably the only real option we had to come in from the left-hand side, and we didn't have a lot of left-handed pitching in the system. We definitely made it our priority in trades, free agents, international."

Three years later, Preller has a roster and a farm system packed with lefties. On Wednesday afternoon, the Padres used left-handers Matt Strahm, Jose Castillo and Brad Hand for multiple innings. Allen started for Double-A San Antonio. Nick Margevicius started for Class A Fort Wayne.

"Our group has done a really good job identifying left-handed pitching over the last few years that we feel are big league-type guys," Preller said. "They're definitely a big part of our system. We've got some depth there."

Padres reach for Guilbe on Day 3
The Padres used seven of their eight Day 2 selections on college players, including a trio of seniors to end the afternoon. Very few of those picks feature signability concerns, meaning the Padres could have some extra money to play with in their Draft pool.

Video: ATL@SD: Preller on Padres' early draft selections

Enter Sean Guilbe, MLB Pipeline's No. 155 Draft prospect -- taken in the 12th round at No. 351 overall, largely because of his commitment to Vanderbilt. He's a strong right-handed hitter, who can play both second and third base.

The Padres own the seventh-largest bonus pool in the Draft at $10,462,200. They acquired an extra selection -- and an extra $812,000 toward that pool -- in the Phil Hughes trade in late May. With that flexibility, they might be able to pry Guilbe from Tennessee.

"Today we tried to be creative in who we took and who we looked at, how we may allocate the money post-[10th round]," said scouting director Mark Conner. " ... Today was a day of being creative."

Preller keen on multi-sport athletes
Not only did Weathers lead Loretto to consecutive state baseball title games. He also led his school to its first Tennessee Class A basketball title. Third-rounder Owen Miller and fourth-rounder Dylan Coleman both set their high school's scoring records in basketball.

Video: Preller, Conner on picking Weathers seventh overall

Fifth-rounder Dwanya Williams-Sutton was a three-sport star who once threw down a highlight-reel putback dunk. Seventh-rounder Jawuan Harris played wide receiver and safety at Rutgers and was named to the All-Big Ten freshman football team in 2016.

Obviously, there's a theme here.

"You used to go in and talk to everybody, and everybody was playing three sports," Preller said. "Most of these guys play baseball year-round now. That's definitely been a shift probably in the last five to seven years. ... In terms of the guys that we took that are athletic and play other sports, we see it as a positive."

By the numbers
Over the course of the three days, the Padres skewed slightly pitching-heavy, taking 25 arms and 16 bats. Of those 25 pitchers, 17 were right-handers.

They also took 23 college players, compared with just 18 out of high school. Among their first 12 picks, nine played baseball in the college ranks this year.

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

San Diego Padres

Padres draft SS Miller in college-heavy Day 2

Illinois State standout hit .384 in junior-year season
MLB.com

SAN DIEGO -- The Padres went college-heavy on Day 2 of the MLB Draft, using seven of their eight picks to select college players, including a trio of seniors late in the afternoon.

Draft Tracker: Follow every Padres Draft pick

SAN DIEGO -- The Padres went college-heavy on Day 2 of the MLB Draft, using seven of their eight picks to select college players, including a trio of seniors late in the afternoon.

Draft Tracker: Follow every Padres Draft pick

A day after nabbing left-hander Ryan Weathers at No. 7, shortstop Xavier Edwards at 38 and outfielder Grant Little at 74, San Diego kicked things off Tuesday by selecting shortstop Owen Miller out of Illinois State.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

The Draft concludes on Wednesday, with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at noon ET. Here's a breakdown of all eight Padres selections on Day 2.

Round 3: SS Owen Miller, Illinois State
Miller succeeded Paul DeJong as Illinois State's shortstop in 2016. He played short in every inning of every game over those next three seasons. Head coach Bo Durkac managed them both.

"Owen was, in my opinion, a more complete hitter," Durkac said.

That's high praise, considering DeJong finished second in National League Rookie of the Year Award voting last season. Durkac noted that DeJong offered a bit more power. But Miller had a better all-fields approach and was a bit savvier at reaching base.

It's probably likelier that the 6-foot Miller ends up at second base. The Padres -- already loaded with middle-infield talent -- coveted his bat and his athleticism. Miller batted .384/.433/.537 during his junior season at Illinois State.

But his most spectacular feat came during summer ball in 2017. Playing for the Lakeshore Chinooks in the Northwoods League, Miller hit for the cycle twice in a span of three days. (The Padres have all of two cycles in their entire history.)

"He's as talented a pure hitter as anyone I've ever coached in 16 years," Durkac said. "... He's a good athlete and one of the more instinctive ballplayers."

Round 4: RHP Dylan Coleman, Missouri State
Two years ago, San Diego also took a fourth-rounder from a Missouri university with high strikeout numbers. It worked well in their favor, as Joey Lucchesi is now one of the top rookie pitchers in the Major Leagues.

With their fifth pick of the 2018 Draft, the Padres selected Coleman, a 6-foot-6, 215 pound junior out of Missouri State.

Coleman is coming off of a 10-2 season in which he collected 129 strikeouts, the 14th highest in the nation. He served as Missouri State's ace and notched 102 2/3 innings this season. His best pitch is his fastball, which topped out at 98 mph this season, according to MLB Pipeline's scouting report.

Round 5: OF Dwanya Williams-Sutton, East Carolina
Hand injuries have limited Williams-Sutton in his tenure at East Carolina. His at-bats were limited during his sophomore and junior seasons there.

But the Padres drafted Williams-Sutton based on his tools and his potential. He's got plenty. In his junior season at East Carolina, he batted .331/.479/.562 with seven homers and 18 steals.

Williams-Sutton was taken by Cincinnati in 26th round of the 2015 Draft, but he didn't sign.

Round 6: LHP Alexuan Vega, Leonides Morales Rodriguez High School (Puerto Rico)
A left-hander from Puerto Rico, Vega owns a very good slider, which makes up for his lower velocity. Still, the Padres are hopeful that the 6-foot-2, 160-pounder grows into his lanky frame and can add a few ticks to his upper-80s fastball.

Vega is verbally committed to Miami Dade college.

Round 7: OF Jawuan Harris, Rutgers
Harris was named to the All-Big Ten freshman football team as a wide receiver in 2016 when he hauled in 39 receptions for 481 yards and three touchdowns. In '17, he moved to defensive back where he tied the team lead with three picks.

Harris almost certainly won't get to play his redshirt junior football season. Since the beginning of the year, Harris hasn't worked with the football program, as he has begun to turn his focus to baseball full-time.

Harris struggled a bit in his junior baseball season, hitting just .246 with two homers, but he swiped 22 bags. Still, there's optimism that Harris' elite athleticism will shine through if and when his focus turns to baseball.

"I think there's a curiosity about him -- what if he just specialized in one sport?" Rutgers baseball coach Joe Litterio told NJ.com. "I think that's something we'll find out, I guess."

Round 8: RHP Steven Wilson, Santa Clara
A sturdy, 6-foot-4 right-hander, Wilson appeared in 16 games for Santa Clara, posting a 3.07 ERA over 44 innings.

Wilson, a six-year senior, missed the entire 2017 season after undergoing Tommy John surgery. San Diego has gambled with Tommy John recoveries in Drafts of the past, with the most recent being in '16 with first-round pick Cal Quantrill and third-rounder Mason Thompson.

High risk? Possibly. High reward? We'll see.

Round 9: 2B Luke Becker, Kentucky
A four-year senior second baseman from the University of Kentucky? The Padres already have one of those: manager Andy Green.

The San Diego skipper still owns the all-time hits record at Kentucky. But Becker put up his share of impressive offensive numbers. He reached base at a .410 clip during his senior season.

Becker's story is also one of survival. He was inside a grain elevator during an explosion this past December and was thrown 20 feet in the blast. But Becker escaped with only relatively minimal burns. Six months later, he's a Padres Draft pick.

Round 10: RHP Jose Quezada, Texas Tech
Quezada made 19 relief appearances during his senior season at Texas Tech, posting a 1.99 ERA over 31 2/3 innings. He struck out 38.

Quezada is also the third consecutive college senior taken by the Padres to end Day 2 of the Draft. That could be a prelude of what's to come on Day 3.

Traditionally, college seniors sign for less than their slot's assigned value. That might leave general manager A.J. Preller and Co. with enough financial flexibility to take a bigger name late in the Draft -- even one with signability questions.

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell. Katie Woo covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow her on Twitter @katiejwoo.

San Diego Padres

Padres nab lefty Weathers, then SS Edwards

San Diego wraps up Day 1 with OF Little at No. 74
MLB.com

SAN DIEGO -- For the third straight year, the Padres spent their top 10 Draft choice on a pitcher. For the second straight year, it's a high school lefty.

With the seventh overall pick in Monday's Draft, San Diego selected left-hander Ryan Weathers out of Loretto (Tenn.) High School. Weathers, a Vanderbilt commit, owns a three-pitch mix featuring a low-90s fastball and an above-average curveball and changeup. He's the son of 19-year big league reliever David Weathers.

SAN DIEGO -- For the third straight year, the Padres spent their top 10 Draft choice on a pitcher. For the second straight year, it's a high school lefty.

With the seventh overall pick in Monday's Draft, San Diego selected left-hander Ryan Weathers out of Loretto (Tenn.) High School. Weathers, a Vanderbilt commit, owns a three-pitch mix featuring a low-90s fastball and an above-average curveball and changeup. He's the son of 19-year big league reliever David Weathers.

Draft Tracker: Follow every Padres Draft pick

With their next two picks on Day 1, the Padres selected high school shortstop Xavier Edwards from Florida and college outfielder Grant Little from Texas Tech. The Draft continues on Tuesday with Rounds 3-10. The MLB.com preview show begins at 9:30 a.m. PT, with exclusive coverage beginning at 10 a.m. PT.

Video: Preller, Conner on picking Weathers seventh overall

As for Weathers, he allowed just one run in 76 innings during his senior season while striking out 148. He finished the season 11-0 and was named the Gatorade National High School Player of the Year, as well as Gatorade's Player of the Year in Tennessee.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

"One of the best high school pitchers in the country this year, and another premium lefty that we add to our system," said general manager A.J. Preller.

"He's just a very natural kid that is extremely confident and a fierce competitor," scouting director Mark Conner said.

Weathers features similarities to each of the Padres' past two top Draft choices. In 2017 they selected MacKenzie Gore, a high school left-hander out of North Carolina with similarly ridiculous numbers. In '16 they took college pitcher Cal Quantrill, whose father, Paul, also spent time in the big leagues. Both Quantrill and Gore rank among MLB Pipeline's top 40 prospects.

Also a standout hitter, the 6-foot-2, 210-pound Weathers batted .434 with five homers in his senior season. But his future is on the mound. He led Loretto to a state championship as a junior in 2017, striking out 12 and posting a shutout in the title game. Then he helped lead Team USA to gold at the U-18 World Cup with a pair of scoreless starts.

Weathers nearly led Loretto to another title as a senior. He pitched nine scoreless frames and struck out 11 in the Class A state championship game against Columbia academy. Trouble is: the game went 12 innings. Loretto lost, 1-0.

"It was one of the better high school games you could see," Preller mused.

Both Preller and Conner were on hand to see Weathers fall just shy of a second consecutive championship. It was the last chance for the Padres to watch him in a game setting after a long scouting process that began when area scout Tyler Stubblefield recommended him.

"He showed us everything we had seen in scouting him over the last few years, honestly," Preller said. "In a big spot, big moment, he was composed, competitive, threw a ton of strikes."

Preller expressed little concern about the signability of any of his top three picks. The Padres have $10,462,200 to spend on their selections in the top 10 rounds (plus any bonus greater than $125,000 later in the Draft). That's the seventh-largest pool in baseball. The recommended value for Weathers' seventh slot in the Draft is $5.23 million.

Edwards goes in Comp A round
The Padres' top-ranked farm system is deep across the board. But nowhere is that depth more prevalent than in the middle infield.

Add another shortstop to the list.

Video: Draft 2018: Padres draft SS Xavier Edwards No. 38

Edwards, like Weathers, is a Vanderbilt commit. He batted .406/.532/.646 with a pair of homers during his senior season at North Broward High School in Florida, but his best tools are his speed and defense.

"It's something I dreamed about for years, since I first picked up a baseball," Edwards said. "Everyone dreams about playing in the big leagues. This is the first step to making that dream come true. For sure, I'm excited to be a Padre."

A 5-foot-10 switch-hitter, Edwards is known as a line-drive bat and a serious stolen-base threat (though he doesn't project to grow into much power). Defensively, his quick hands -- and quick movements in general -- set him apart.

"He's a guy that we had as one of the more advanced high school bats in terms of plate discipline, seeing pitches, doing the things you want to see from good leadoff hitters," Preller said. "We see him as a middle-infield, top-of-the-order guy that's got a dynamic skill set."

Edwards' slot is valued at $1,878,300.

Video: Draft 2018: Edwards on being 38th overall pick

Little forever linked to Hughes
The Padres forfeited their second-round pick when they signed Eric Hosmer to an eight-year deal during the offseason. But last week, Preller swung a trade to add a third selection on Day 1.

With that pick -- acquired from the Twins, along with righty reliever Phil Hughes -- the Padres landed Little in the competitive balance round B. It seems likeliest that Little will play the outfield, but the Padres will give him reps in the infield as well. He played some shortstop at Texas Tech.

As a Draft-eligible sophomore, Little batted .380 with 12 home runs. His slot value is $812,200.

Video: Draft 2018: Padres draft LF Grant Little No. 74

That extra money could come in handy when the Padres begin the process of signing these selections over the coming weeks.

"Having the extra pick definitely gave Mark and the group some additional options -- not only having the pick to make the selection, but also the money associated with it," Preller said. "It's definitely an exercise in trying to mix and match and figure out how to make your money work for you. From our standpoint, we viewed it as not just a little addition. It was something that was going to give us some flexibility to maybe get some players we may not have had access to."

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

San Diego Padres

Padres ready to add to stacked Minors system

MLB.com

LOS ANGELES -- The Padres' farm system is the best in baseball, according to MLB Pipeline, and the past three Draft classes of general manager A.J. Preller and scouting director Mark Conner have played no small part in establishing that high standard.

The 2018 Draft begins today with the Draft preview show on MLB Network and MLB.com at 3 p.m. PT. MLB Network will broadcast the first 43 picks (Round 1 and Competitive Balance Round A), while MLB.com will stream all 78 picks on Day 1. MLB.com will also provide live pick-by-pick coverage of Rounds 3-10 on Day 2, with a preview show beginning at 9:30 a.m. PT. Then, Rounds 11-40 can be heard live on MLB.com on Day 3, beginning at 9 a.m. PT.

LOS ANGELES -- The Padres' farm system is the best in baseball, according to MLB Pipeline, and the past three Draft classes of general manager A.J. Preller and scouting director Mark Conner have played no small part in establishing that high standard.

The 2018 Draft begins today with the Draft preview show on MLB Network and MLB.com at 3 p.m. PT. MLB Network will broadcast the first 43 picks (Round 1 and Competitive Balance Round A), while MLB.com will stream all 78 picks on Day 1. MLB.com will also provide live pick-by-pick coverage of Rounds 3-10 on Day 2, with a preview show beginning at 9:30 a.m. PT. Then, Rounds 11-40 can be heard live on MLB.com on Day 3, beginning at 9 a.m. PT.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

Go to MLB.com/draft to see the Top 200 Prospects list, projected top picks from MLB Pipeline analysts Jim Callis and Jonathan Mayo, the complete order of selection and more. And follow @MLBDraft on Twitter to see what Draft hopefuls, clubs and experts are saying.

Here's how the Draft is shaping up for the Padres, whose first selection is the seventh overall pick.

In about 50 words
For Conner and Preller, it's their fourth Draft together at the helm of the Padres. They're already beginning to see the fruits of their labor. Early 2016 picks Eric Lauer and Joey Lucchesi have found places in the starting rotation, while Phil Maton (2015) has become a bullpen asset. The Padres will pick seventh, 38th and 74th on Day 1 this year. They own picks in both Competitive Balance rounds but have no second-round pick, which they forfeited when they signed Eric Hosmer during the offseason. (They acquired the 74th pick in a trade with Minnesota on Sunday.)

Video: NYM@SD: Lucchesi strikes out 6, allows just 4 hits

• Padres Top 30 Prospects

The scoop
It's the third straight year in which the Padres own a top 10 pick, having selected righty Cal Quantrill in 2016 and lefty MacKenzie Gore in '17. Entering this year's Draft, they're both ranked among the top 40 prospects in baseball. Don't be surprised if the Padres lean toward another high-upside arm. They've been linked with high school left-hander Matthew Liberatore from Mountain Ridge High School in Arizona.

Video: Rundown: Jonathan Mayo on high school pitchers

First-round buzz
Callis has the Padres selecting Liberatore, and that move would certainly fit their recent philosophy. According to Callis, Liberatore is one of four prep pitching prospects in play for the Friars, alongside right-handers Carter Stewart (Florida) and Cole Winn (Orange, Calif.) and left-hander Ryan Weathers (Tennessee).

Video: PDP: Matthew Liberatore from Peoria, Ariz.

Money matters
Each team has a bonus pool equal to the sum of the values of that club's selections in the first 10 rounds. (The more picks a team has, and the earlier it picks, the larger the pool.) The signing bonuses for a team's selections in the first 10 rounds, plus any bonus greater than $125,000 for a player taken after the 10th round, will apply toward the bonus-pool total. Teams that exceed their limits will be taxed, with penalties varying based on the percentage by which that limit is exceeded. This year, the Padres have a pool of $10,462,200 to spend, including a suggested figure of $5,226,500 for their first pick.

Shopping list
The system is already loaded with arms -- specifically left-handers -- but that won't stop Preller and Co. from going that route again. Organizationally, if there's an area that needs to be shored up, it's probably the outfield. The Padres' farm is overflowing with arms and infielders, but it lacks a depth of big-time power hitters.

Trend watch
The Padres insist they're merely taking the best players on the board. It just so happens those best players have skewed toward pitching. In each of the last three seasons they've used their highest pick on a pitcher. During that span, they've spent 21 of their 33 picks in the top 10 rounds on pitching.

Rising fast
When the Padres drafted center fielder Buddy Reed out of Florida in 2016, they knew they'd selected a defensive standout with remarkable athleticism. His bat was a question. In his first two professional seasons, Reed posted a .675 OPS, but he's turned things around at the plate this year. Entering play Sunday, Reed was batting .350/.385/.594 with eight homers and 23 stolen bases for Class A Advanced Lake Elsinore.

Cinderella story
Adam Cimber toiled in the Minors for five seasons following his selection by the Padres in the ninth round of the 2013 Draft. The sidearming right-hander overhauled his pitching philosophy before the 2017 season, and he's flourished since. Cimber posted a 2.90 ERA between Double-A and Triple-A last season. He was a surprise addition to the roster before Opening Day, and he's thrived in his first big league stint, having posted a 2.81 ERA with 32 strikeouts in 25 2/3 innings.

Video: SD@COL: Cimber fans Tauchman to retire the side

In the show
The rotation has already begun to feel the impact of the club's deep 2016 Draft class. Among all pitchers taken in that '16 Draft, Lauer and Lucchesi were the first two to arrive in the Majors. The active roster boasts four players taken by the Padres in past Drafts, including: Lauer, Cimber, Cory Spangenberg and Travis Jankowski. (Maton and Lucchesi are on the DL.)

Padres recent first-round picks
2017: LHP MacKenzie Gore (Class A Fort Wayne)
2016: RHP Cal Quantrill (Double-A San Antonio
2016: LHP Eric Lauer (Padres)
2016: 3B Hudson Potts (Class A Advanced Lake Elsinore)
2014: SS Trea Turner (Nationals)
2013: RF Hunter Renfroe (Padres, on DL)

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

San Diego Padres

Friars eager to see how Lockett fares in Majors

MLB.com

SAN DIEGO -- The Padres have filled their rotation vacancy. Walker Lockett will get the ball Friday for his Major League debut when San Diego opens a three-game series against the Reds at Petco Park.

It's unclear how long Lockett will remain in the rotation. That depends, in part, on how well he pitches. The Padres will make a corresponding move ahead of Friday's game.

SAN DIEGO -- The Padres have filled their rotation vacancy. Walker Lockett will get the ball Friday for his Major League debut when San Diego opens a three-game series against the Reds at Petco Park.

It's unclear how long Lockett will remain in the rotation. That depends, in part, on how well he pitches. The Padres will make a corresponding move ahead of Friday's game.

"This is the time to start taking looks at guys," Padres manager Andy Green said. "He's got the opportunity to come up here, establish himself and throw the ball well and possibly earn another shot."

Lockett fills the rotation spot left vacant by rookie Joey Lucchesi, who has missed two weeks with a right hip strain. To avoid Lucchesi's turn, the Padres worked around an off-day and used a bullpen day.

Now, however, it appears likely Lucchesi will need a rehab appearance before he comes back. That could clear a path for Lockett to make another start Wednesday against the Braves.

In 10 starts for Triple-A El Paso this season, Lockett compiled a 5.31 ERA with 50 strikeouts in 59 1/3 innings. He has posted a 4.14 ERA in parts of seven Minor League seasons.

Long-relief options Bryan Mitchell and Robbie Erlin were candidates to start, as well, but both have struggled mightily as starting pitchers this season.

"[Erlin] has been so good out of the bullpen, and he's been so valuable in saving arms, preserving guys," Green said. "We like him in that role. In Mitchell's case, we told him when he went down there that you earn your right back to the rotation, and that hasn't happened yet. There's no other way around that."

Lockett's Minors numbers have been poor, too, albeit in mostly hitter-friendly environments. Still, the timing was just right. Triple-A right-handers Luis Perdomo, Brett Kennedy and Kyle Lloyd are all on the disabled list, and the Padres were hesitant to use their big league bullpen arms.

Lockett has been on the 40-man roster for a year and a half (since he was protected from the 2016 Rule 5 Draft). Friday night will be the Padres' first opportunity to see him against big league opposition.

Hedges could need cortisone injection
Padres catcher Austin Hedges played catch Thursday for the first time since last week, when his rehab stint was shut down after his elbow tendinitis flared up.

Should Hedges continue to feel soreness, he could require a cortisone injection. Green noted that tests have revealed no structural damage in Hedges' elbow, and he added that a cortisone shot could be used "to try to knock out the last bit of pain."

If Hedges doesn't require a shot, he could be set for a mid-June return. If he does, that target return date would be pushed back by a few days.

Myers on the mend
Right fielder Wil Myers took 20 dry swings Thursday, the first time he's swung a bat since he strained his left oblique in late April. Afterward, he said he felt no soreness or pain.

It's an encouraging sign, though Myers remains a long way from a return to the Padres. He is still at least a couple of weeks from a rehab stint, putting early July as the likeliest target.

"We're talking about somebody who's laid off all physical activity for the better part of a month now," Green said. "How quickly his body gets up to speed -- it's going to take some time."

San Diego Padres, Walker Lockett

Padres acquire Hughes, Draft pick from Twins

MLB.com

LOS ANGELES -- The Padres landed one piece for the present and another for their future in a trade with the Twins on Sunday morning.

Veteran reliever Phil Hughes, who was designated for assignment by Minnesota last week, is headed to San Diego. So, too, is the 74th pick in next month's Draft. The Padres sent catcher Janigson Villalobos, an unheralded rookie ball prospect, to the Twins to complete the deal.

LOS ANGELES -- The Padres landed one piece for the present and another for their future in a trade with the Twins on Sunday morning.

Veteran reliever Phil Hughes, who was designated for assignment by Minnesota last week, is headed to San Diego. So, too, is the 74th pick in next month's Draft. The Padres sent catcher Janigson Villalobos, an unheralded rookie ball prospect, to the Twins to complete the deal.

Team sources indicated the Twins will cover the rest of Hughes' 2018 salary and around half his '19 cost, which is $13.2 million.

In return for the spending, the Padres netted a potentially useful piece for their bullpen. But the sticking point of the trade was always the pick. Clearly, general manager A.J. Preller is bullish on his scouting department's ability to find value late on Day 1 of the Draft.

San Diego lost its second-round selection when it signed Eric Hosmer during the offseason. With Sunday's deal, the Padres now own the seventh, 38th, 74th and 84th picks in the Draft, which begins June 4. They also increased their bonus pool to $10,462,200, the seventh largest in the Majors.

"The more picks you have, the more opportunity you have to hit on guys," said Preller. "It's consistent with what we're trying to do, which is to build our system, our foundation of young players.

"Picking now four times in the top 85 -- in what we think is a pretty healthy Draft pool -- gives us the ability over the course of the next week to allow our scouts to do their jobs, and hopefully we'll have a pretty strong Draft class again."

As for Hughes, he's expected to report to San Diego on Monday, though it's unclear whether he'll arrive in time for an afternoon game against the Marlins. It's likeliest he'll be activated Tuesday, at which point the Padres will need to make a corresponding move.

When a player's contract is designated for assignment -- often abbreviated "DFA" -- that player is immediately removed from his club's 40-man roster, and 25-man roster if he was on that as well. Within seven days of the transaction (it was previously 10 days), the player must either be traded, released or placed on irrevocable outright waivers.

In seven appearances this season -- two of them starts -- Hughes posted a 6.75 ERA. He began the season on the disabled list with a left oblique strain.

Hughes is in his 12th big league season, and the Padres will be his third big league team. He was an All-Star with the Yankees in 2010, and he set an MLB record with his 11.63 strikeout-to-walk ratio for Minnesota in 2014. Hughes owns a 4.49 ERA and a 1.31 WHIP over 1,270 1/3 career innings.

"We see Phil as a guy that gives us some depth," Preller said. "... From our standpoint, we're going to see if he can continue to get better, get back to that form he had a couple years ago. We make no guarantees to Phil, but we'll give him a chance to pitch out of the bullpen."

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

San Diego Padres, Phil Hughes

These 5 prospects could impact NL West race

MLB.com

The National League West race has already been plenty surprising, but it also feels ... incomplete. The Dodgers and Giants are both without their aces. The D-backs are down their best everyday player. The standings seem a bit topsy-turvy right now, but it's also easy to remind yourself that these teams are sure to change over the coming months.

And that's not just a matter of injuries. Every team in the division has at least one prospect knocking on the door, players who could shape the race in their own ways if given the opportunity.

The National League West race has already been plenty surprising, but it also feels ... incomplete. The Dodgers and Giants are both without their aces. The D-backs are down their best everyday player. The standings seem a bit topsy-turvy right now, but it's also easy to remind yourself that these teams are sure to change over the coming months.

And that's not just a matter of injuries. Every team in the division has at least one prospect knocking on the door, players who could shape the race in their own ways if given the opportunity.

Here's a look at one prospect to watch for each club.

Video: Top Prospects: Jon Duplantier, RHP, D-backs

D-backs
Prospect:
Jon Duplantier, RHP
MLB Pipeline rankings: D-backs' No. 1 prospect, overall No. 68
Why you should keep an eye on him: A year after starring in the notoriously hitter-friendly California League, Duplantier has handled the jump to Double-A with ease. And he's done it while keeping his strikeout rate high and slashing his walk rate. The problem, of course, is that Arizona has plenty of pitching, even with Taijuan Walker out. What the Snakes need is a bat. Still, Duplantier has risen rapidly -- he's at his fourth level after just 30 professional starts -- so he could be putting himself in position to help if there's a need down the road sometime.
ETA: It will most likely be 2019, but Duplantier is doing everything he can to force the issue.

Video: LAD@SD: Verdugo plates Utley with a single to right

Dodgers
Prospect:
Alex Verdugo, OF
MLB Pipeline rankings: Dodgers' No. 2 prospect, overall No. 30
Why you should keep an eye on him: We could have gone with Walker Buehler here, but it seems likely he'll be losing his prospect status sooner than later. He's up, and it seems he's up to stay. Verdugo appears to have a tougher fight for a spot on the big league roster. He has the ability, though. Verdugo has excellent bat-to-ball skills, and he's using them to hit .300 yet again. He also has an exceptional arm and is at least a big league-caliber right fielder, if not a potential center fielder. It's a bit of an unusual package -- Verdugo is not really a leadoff man since he doesn't walk much, and he's not really a middle-of-the-order hitter since he doesn't hit for power. But he hits, he catches, he throws and he held his own in an audition earlier this year. Verdugo will help the Dodgers again before the year is out.
ETA: September at the latest, but it will be surprising if it's not sooner.

Giants
Prospect:
Austin Slater, OF
MLB Pipeline rankings: Giants' No. 5 prospect
Why you should keep an eye on him: In short, because Slater is raking. And one of baseball's oldest truths is, if you hit, they'll find a spot for you. In classic Giants fashion, Slater is not a highly touted tool box. He's just a guy who's producing. Slater has refined his strike zone over the years and he's torching the PCL to the tune of .396/.472/.679. He is 25 and in his fifth year of pro ball, so he may not have a ton of growth remaining in his game. But Slater is hitting, and that's the surest ticket to The Show.
ETA: It's kind of now or never; if Slater can't force his way into the mix before the year is out, it's hard to see when he will.

Video: Top Prospects: Luis Urias, 2B, Padres

Padres
Prospect:
Luis Urias, IF
MLB Pipeline rankings: Padres' No. 3 prospect, overall No. 32
Why you should keep an eye on him: Urias doesn't have quite the hype, or the famous name, of fellow future Friar Fernando Tatis Jr. But he is closer to the Majors than Tatis, and at least arguably having a better year. Urias is the more polished of the two prized infield prospects, with an advanced approach that has produced a .407 OBP at Triple-A. He looks like he'll play a solid second base in the big leagues. Urias may never be a basher, but he's shown some improved pop this year, which will help him keep drawing walks at the top level.
ETA: It could very well come after the non-waiver Trade Deadline, once San Diego clears some space for him.

Video: COL@PIT: McMahon doubles the lead with RBI single

Rockies
Prospect:
Ryan McMahon, 1B
MLB Pipeline rankings: Rockies' No. 2 prospect, overall No. 38
Why you should keep an eye on him: You may not have heard, but the Rockies haven't gotten an awful lot of production out of first base this year. And McMahon can hit, posting a .355 average in the Minors last year. He's scuffled some this year, including in a 60 plate-appearance look with the big club, but he's come on since he was sent back down to Triple-A. Meanwhile Ian Desmond is hitting .180 with a .233 OBP, and has a .671 OPS since joining the Rockies last year. There's also been talk of giving McMahon a look at second base, but that seems like a tough ask. Still, it's an indication that he's on the big club's radar.
ETA: Like Verdugo, McMahon is certain to get a September callup, and likely to get another before then.

Matthew Leach is the National League executive editor for MLB.com.

San Diego Padres, San Francisco Giants, Los Angeles Dodgers, Arizona Diamondbacks, Colorado Rockies, Jon Duplantier, Ryan McMahon, Austin Slater, Luis Urias, Alex Verdugo

Padres' young hitters navigating info upgrade

Special to MLB.com

WASHINGTON -- When Franmil Reyes arrived in the Majors after his impressive stint at Triple-A, the Padres outfielder received all the trappings of a big leaguer, including more information about hitting and pitching than he knew what do with.

"It's just amazing," Reyes said. "All of us now watch videos, and I really didn't know about that when I was in Triple-A. It's just incredible how the guys here study the pitchers."

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WASHINGTON -- When Franmil Reyes arrived in the Majors after his impressive stint at Triple-A, the Padres outfielder received all the trappings of a big leaguer, including more information about hitting and pitching than he knew what do with.

"It's just amazing," Reyes said. "All of us now watch videos, and I really didn't know about that when I was in Triple-A. It's just incredible how the guys here study the pitchers."

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Reyes isn't alone in his information overload -- the Padres have several young hitters who are trying to grasp the increased statistical analysis and breakdown of opposing pitchers. Fortunately, the veterans on the team have stepped in to provide some relief and advice.

"They are trying to get us ready," Reyes said. "We were talking about this the other day. It started with [Eric Hosmer], A.J. Ellis and Freddy Galvis. One of them said, 'We can't win with only two guys.' So, if everyone starts studying, all of us are going to be ready. I know that we will get there."

Ellis said the way he's tried to help the Friars' newcomers is to find out what works for each of them on an individual basis.

"There's a lot of information, and it's just trying to personalize it for each guy," Ellis said. "You ask them a lot of questions: What's important to them? What are some things they want to know? So much of it is not about what is there but eliminating things that aren't going to be there. So, trying to narrow the focus so you don't have to worry about the entire package of a pitcher."

Manager Andy Green said all young players try to find the balance between information and instinct in the early days of their careers and that Reyes is no different.

"There's not a kid that doesn't come to the big leagues that doesn't get overwhelmed by the amount of information," Green said. "You let them navigate their way through it. I can look back when I got to the big leagues, and they told me, 'It's 66 percent slider in this count,' and I'm thinking about percentages in my head and I can't pull the trigger.

"Everybody's gone through that, and then you get used to utilizing that information and then you're not crippled or paralyzed by it. [Reyes] is at the start of that process. Some guys just come up and swing for a while, but we have veterans here who value that information and try to get it to the young guys to accelerate that process."

For Reyes, who hit his first career home run Monday, the statistics and reports are helping him gain a foothold at the game's highest level.

"Back in Triple-A I knew most of the pitchers, but here I don't know anybody," he said. "But now, with the information, I go out there like I know those guys and I feel really comfortable at the plate."

Perdomo a rotation candidate?
With Joey Lucchesi's status in the rotation doubtful, the Padres will have to come up with a plan for this weekend's series against the Dodgers. One option could be former starter Luis Perdomo, who is 3-2 at Triple-A El Paso and coming off a solid start Monday.

"I think overall, people have been pleased with: one, the way he's gone about his work, and two, his execution," Green said. "I think we look at him and he's very much in consideration for what we're going to do in the coming weeks. But we haven't made a determination."

Video: LAD@SD: Perdomo opens the game with a strikeout

Green said the team would take into consideration how much time Lucchesi might miss before deciding.

"You don't want to bring [Perdomo] back for one start if you feel Joey is going to be back," Green said. "We'd probably just find a way to plug that hole without disrupting his development time in Triple-A."

Injury report
• Right-hander Colin Rea, who is recovering from Tommy John surgery, started a rehab assignment with Double-A San Antonio.

• Lucchesi (hip) is still unable to throw more than 75 feet, which has slowed his recovery time. Green is aiming for the pitcher to hit 120 feet.

Wil Myers (oblique) has yet to take part in any baseball-related activities. Green said it "was not part of the equation right now."

Elliott Smith is a contributor to MLB.com based in Washington.

San Diego Padres, Franmil Reyes

Franmil crushes first MLB home run vs. Nats

Special to MLB.com

WASHINGTON -- Padres right fielder Franmil Reyes hit his first career home run in the fourth inning of the Padres' 10-2 loss on Monday at Nationals Park, connecting on a 1-0 changeup from left-hander Gio Gonzalez for a two-run homer.

Reyes' homer traveled 398 feet with an exit velocity of 108 mph, according to Statcast™, and cut the Padres' deficit to 6-2. The 22-year-old made his Major League debut on May 14 and started his Padres career 2-for-17 at the plate through six games, but there was no doubting his power potential.

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WASHINGTON -- Padres right fielder Franmil Reyes hit his first career home run in the fourth inning of the Padres' 10-2 loss on Monday at Nationals Park, connecting on a 1-0 changeup from left-hander Gio Gonzalez for a two-run homer.

Reyes' homer traveled 398 feet with an exit velocity of 108 mph, according to Statcast™, and cut the Padres' deficit to 6-2. The 22-year-old made his Major League debut on May 14 and started his Padres career 2-for-17 at the plate through six games, but there was no doubting his power potential.

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"It was a great swing for him," Padres manager Andy Green said. "I know it's a big moment, and I know he doesn't want to have it happen in a game we lose like this, but the kid's first Major League home run is a lot of fun for him."

In 36 games this season with Triple-A El Paso, Reyes had 14 homers and 38 RBIs. In 2017 with Double-A San Antonio, his 25 homers and 102 RBIs led the Padres' Minor League system.

Reyes' 14 homers in the Minors this season were tied for the most with the Nationals' Juan Soto, who also hit his first MLB clout in Monday's game.

Elliott Smith is a contributor to MLB.com based in Washington D.C.

San Diego Padres, Franmil Reyes

Padres call up Minors HR leader Reyes

Asuaje sent to Triple-A El Paso in corresponding move
MLB.com

SAN DIEGO -- Franmil Reyes' red-hot start to the 2018 Minor League season has paid off with a big league promotion.

The hulking outfielder had his contract selected ahead of Monday's game against the Rockies. Second baseman Carlos Asuaje was optioned to Triple-A El Paso in a corresponding move.

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SAN DIEGO -- Franmil Reyes' red-hot start to the 2018 Minor League season has paid off with a big league promotion.

The hulking outfielder had his contract selected ahead of Monday's game against the Rockies. Second baseman Carlos Asuaje was optioned to Triple-A El Paso in a corresponding move.

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Reyes leads all Minor Leaguers with 14 homers, and he was hitting .346/.440/.748 in 35 games for Triple-A El Paso. A 22-year-old out of the Dominican Republic, Reyes is known for his easy power and muscular 6-foot-6 frame. He was left unprotected in December's Rule 5 Draft, but every other big league club passed on the outfielder.

"I'm a big guy," said Reyes, making the understatement of the season. "You guys will see a lot of homers, hopefully."

Organizationally, the timing was right for Reyes' promotion, and he certainly earned it. With Wil Myers and Hunter Renfroe on the disabled list, the Padres figured they might as well give Reyes a shot to prove himself at the highest level.

He was in the lineup batting sixth against Rockies left-hander Tyler Anderson on Monday night.

"We have to take these windows of opportunity when they present themselves," said Padres manager Andy Green. "With Wil on the DL and Hunter not back from injury and Franmil swinging the bat really well, this is a really nice opportunity to get a first look at him."

Reyes will slot into an already crowded outfield -- though with Asuaje's demotion, it's likely Jose Pirela will play very little left field. Pirela had already begun to take the bulk of the reps at second base, and now he's unquestionably the everyday guy there.

As for Reyes, it's likely he will split starts in the outfield with Travis Jankowski, Manuel Margot and Franchy Cordero. All four are, essentially, auditioning for their place in the club's outfield of the future. At present, there's plenty of playing time to go around.

"You've got four guys who will be out there in the outfield pretty consistently," Green said. "If we're playing three out of the four [every night], we'll be in decent shape."

Reyes does not appear among MLB Pipeline's Padres Top 30 prospects. Still, he's highly regarded within the organization -- one that possesses MLB Pipeline's top-rated farm system. 

"It probably speaks to the depth of our system," Green said. "A lot of guys with [his numbers] pop on a lot of prospects lists. He didn't pop on our list. But, a smart organization listens to what the bats are telling you. His bat was screaming at us from El Paso."

At the plate, Reyes offers some of the same tools as Cordero, who is best known for his hard contact. Cordero's 93-mph average exit velocity leads the team this season, and he's the owner of four of the National League's hardest-hit baseballs. One Padres staffer noted Reyes' exit velocity has generally topped Cordero's this season (albeit at a vastly different skill level against in the Minor Leagues).

Like Cordero, Reyes also has a penchant to expand the strike zone, but he's cut down on that a bit this season.

The comparisons between the two end there. Reyes possesses none of Cordero's speed or defensive aptitude. In fact, defensively, Reyes is a major question mark.

Still, the Padres are eager to see how Reyes' skill set will play in the Majors. There's only one way to find out.

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

San Diego Padres, Franmil Reyes

Paddack dominant in return from Tommy John

In first start since July 2016, Padres' No. 22 prospect fires six scoreless
MLB.com

Chris Paddack had to wait a long time for this game -- and once he finally returned to the mound, he made the most of it.

The 22-year-old Padres right-hander, ranked the organization's No. 22 prospect by MLB Pipeline, had missed the entire 2017 season after undergoing Tommy John surgery. On Monday, he took the field for his first start of 2018 with Class A Advanced Lake Elsinore.

Chris Paddack had to wait a long time for this game -- and once he finally returned to the mound, he made the most of it.

The 22-year-old Padres right-hander, ranked the organization's No. 22 prospect by MLB Pipeline, had missed the entire 2017 season after undergoing Tommy John surgery. On Monday, he took the field for his first start of 2018 with Class A Advanced Lake Elsinore.

Paddack was lights-out. He threw six shutout innings to earn his first win of the year, allowing only three hits and striking out seven against Inland Empire, an Angels' affiliate. He threw 55 of his 75 pitches for strikes.

• How Padres prospects fared on Monday

Paddack picked up right where he left off in 2016, when he was dominating in his first full professional season before suffering the forearm strain that led to his season-ending surgery.

At the time of his injury, Paddack had a 0.64 ERA in three starts with Class A Fort Wayne -- his first three starts in the San Diego organization, after the Padres acquired him from the Marlins for Fernando Rodney at the end of June. He had been dominant with Miami to start the season, too, with a 0.95 ERA in six starts for its Class A team, Greensboro.

After his encouraging 2018 debut, Paddack's future continues to look bright. He can throw his fastball in the 92-95 mph range, and his changeup is excellent, a plus-plus secondary pitch according to scouting reports. And his curveball had been improving before his surgery, although there is still work to be done.

David Adler is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @_dadler.

San Diego Padres

Lauer draws Coors Field start for MLB debut

Padres No. 12 prospect will start Tuesday vs. Rockies in tough pitching environment