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Bell, Baldelli interviewed by Texas for manager

MLB.com

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers added two more candidates to their managerial search when they interviewed both David Bell and Rocco Baldelli on Monday, according to sources.

Bell is the son of former Rangers third baseman Buddy Bell and is currently the Giants' vice president of player development. Baldelli is the Rays' Major League field coordinator.

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers added two more candidates to their managerial search when they interviewed both David Bell and Rocco Baldelli on Monday, according to sources.

Bell is the son of former Rangers third baseman Buddy Bell and is currently the Giants' vice president of player development. Baldelli is the Rays' Major League field coordinator.

The Rangers previously interviewed farm director Jayce Tingler, Cubs bench coach Brandon Hyde, Astros bench coach Joe Espada and former Yankees manager Joe Girardi. Interim manager Don Wakamatsu is also expected to interview this week.

Bell played 12 years in the Major Leagues as an infielder with six different teams from 1995-2006 and has a wide range of experience since his playing career ended. He managed four years in the Reds' Minor League system, spent 2013 as the Cubs' third-base coach and '14-17 as assistant hitting coach and bench coach for the Cardinals. He left St. Louis after the 2017 season to join the Giants' front office.

Bell is a member of a three-generation baseball family. His grandfather was Gus Bell, an outfielder who was in the big leagues from 1950 to 1964. Buddy Bell spent 18 years in the Majors and was with the Rangers from 1979-85 and again in 1989. David Bell's brother, Mike, was the Rangers' top pick in the 1994 MLB Draft and played 19 games for the Reds in 2000.

Baldelli is a former outfielder for the Rays who once appeared to be a star in the making. He played well in his first two seasons in 2003-04, but then suffered a series of debilitating injuries that derailed his career. His playing career ended at the age of 29 after the 2010 season. Baldelli spent four years in the Rays' organization as a special assistant, then three years as their first base coach and 2018 as field coordinator.

The Rangers' manager job came open when Jeff Banister was dismissed last month after four years at the helm, during which time he won two AL West titles in 2015-16.

Texas is also looking for two new hitting instructors. Justin Mashore was let go at the end of the season and Anthony Iapoce left the organization to join the Cubs on Monday. The Rangers are waiting to complete their managerial search before they make any formal announcements on the rest of the coaching staff.

T.R. Sullivan has covered the Rangers since 1989, and for MLB.com since 2006. Follow him on Twitter @Sullivan_Ranger and listen to his podcast.

Texas Rangers

Rangers lose hitting coach Iapoce to Cubs

MLB.com

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers will be looking for a new hitting coach after Anthony Iapoce informed the organization he is taking the same job with the Cubs.

The Rangers are allowing all their coaches to explore other opportunities while they conduct their search for a new manager. Interim manager Don Wakamatsu is expected to interview this week.

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers will be looking for a new hitting coach after Anthony Iapoce informed the organization he is taking the same job with the Cubs.

The Rangers are allowing all their coaches to explore other opportunities while they conduct their search for a new manager. Interim manager Don Wakamatsu is expected to interview this week.

• Rangers interview Girardi for manager job

The Rangers hired Iapoce from the Cubs. He was a special assistant in Chicago's player development system before joining Texas as hitting coach in 2016. Iapoce replaces Chili Davis, who was let go by the Cubs at the end of the season.

The Rangers were fourth in the American League with 765 runs scored in 2016 and fifth with 799 in 2017. But they scored just 737 runs this past season, seventh most in the league. The Rangers also set a club record with 1,493 strikeouts in 2017 and almost matched it with 1,484 strikeouts this season.

Iapoce shared the duties with Justin Mashore, who has already been informed by Texas that he won't be back next season. The Rangers' top Minor League hitting coaches this season were Howard Johnson at Triple-A Round Rock and Jason Hart at Double-A Frisco. Josue Perez served as the Minor League hitting coordinator and Dwayne Murphy was his assistant.

Rudy Jaramillo served as the Rangers' hitting coach from 1995-2009. Since then, Texas has had five hitting coaches in nine years.

T.R. Sullivan has covered the Rangers since 1989, and for MLB.com since 2006. Follow him on Twitter @Sullivan_Ranger and listen to his podcast.

Texas Rangers

Rangers interview Girardi for manager job

MLB.com

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers are showing they are willing to at least think big by interviewing former Yankees manager Joe Girardi on Friday.

Girardi spent 10 years managing the Yankees in 2008-17 and led them to a World Series title in 2009. He also managed the Marlins in 2006. He is the most experienced and successful candidate Rangers general manager Jon Daniels has interviewed during his three managerial searches.

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers are showing they are willing to at least think big by interviewing former Yankees manager Joe Girardi on Friday.

Girardi spent 10 years managing the Yankees in 2008-17 and led them to a World Series title in 2009. He also managed the Marlins in 2006. He is the most experienced and successful candidate Rangers general manager Jon Daniels has interviewed during his three managerial searches.

Daniels did inquire about former Twins manager Tom Kelly in 2006. But Kelly, who won two World Series with the Twins, was not interested in coming out of retirement. Daniels ended up interviewing Ron Washington, Don Wakamatsu, Manny Acta, Trey Hillman and John Russell. Washington got the job, while the other four candidates were eventually hired as managers elsewhere.

The Rangers interviewed eight candidates in 2014, and none had Major League managerial experience beyond the 22 games for Tim Bogar as Washington's interim replacement. The other candidates were Jeff Banister, Steve Buechele, Mike Maddux, Joe McEwing, Kevin Cash, Torey Lovullo and Alex Cora. Banister ended up getting the job and was dismissed last month after four years, despite two division titles.

Girardi averaged 91 wins per season with the Yankees, while leading them to three division titles and six postseason appearances. One of them was in 2010 when the Yankees lost to the Rangers in the American League Championship Series. Girardi was dismissed after the 2017 season.

His one year with the Marlins in 2006 may be more relevant to the Rangers. The Marlins had the lowest payroll in baseball, their entire lineup was under 30 years old and so were five of their top six starting pitchers. Girardi led them to a record of 78-84, and he was named National League Manager of the Year. He was dismissed after the season after clashing with owner Jeffrey Loria.

The Rangers finished 67-95 this season and will be built around a core group of offensive players next season. The Rangers' chances of being a contender will depend largely on how quickly they can fix their starting pitching and rebuild their bullpen.

Girardi was dismissed in part because the Yankees wanted a different voice in their clubhouse and somebody who was better at communicating with their young players. Those were some of the same reasons the Rangers parted ways with Banister.

If Girardi is hired by the Rangers, it will be interesting to see how those issues are addressed. But there is no doubt Girardi has an impressive resume, possibly the best one ever considered by the Rangers in a managerial search. He has already interviewed with the Reds.

The Rangers have never hired or even considered a manager who had previously won a World Series. The closest was Darrell Johnson, who managed them for 66 games at the end of the 1982 season. He managed the Red Sox to the 1975 World Series before losing to the Reds.

The Rangers replaced him with Doug Rader in 1983, picking him over an unproven Minor League manager named Jim Leyland. Three years later, Rader was replaced by Bobby Valentine, who had also never managed. Valentine was replaced by Toby Harrah halfway through the 1992 season and then Kevin Kennedy took over in 1993-94.

The Rangers hired an experienced manager in Johnny Oates, who took over in 1995. He had managed the Orioles in 1991-94, but without taking them to postseason.

It wasn't until Buck Showalter was hired in 2002 to replace Jerry Narron that the Rangers ended that run of managers without postseason experience. Showalter had led the Yankees to a Wild Card berth in 1995 and the D-backs to a division title in 1999, but lost in the first round both times.

The only other Rangers manager to have led a team to postseason prior to being hired in Texas was Billy Martin. He led the Twins to the AL West title in 1969 and the Tigers to the East crown in 1972 before being hired by the Rangers in 1973. Martin replaced Whitey Herzog; both ended up winning World Series elsewhere after being let go by the Rangers.

The Rangers interviewed farm director Jayce Tingler, Astros bench coach Joe Espada and Cubs bench coach Brandon Hyde earlier this week. Wakamatsu, who served as interim manager after Banister was let go, is expected to be interviewed next week.

T.R. Sullivan has covered the Rangers since 1989, and for MLB.com since 2006. Follow him on Twitter @Sullivan_Ranger and listen to his podcast.

Texas Rangers

Rangers' AFL contingent includes Minors' K-rate king

MLB.com

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- The Rangers found more than their share of intriguing arms deep in the 2015 Draft. Left-hander Jeffrey Springs, a 30th-rounder out of Appalachian State, jumped from low Class A to the big leagues this year and was one of Texas' most effective relievers in the last two months of the season.

Lefty C.D. Pelham, who lasted until the 33rd round because he couldn't throw strikes at Spartanburg Methodist (S.C.) JC, pitched in the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game in July and debuted in Arlington in September. He looks like a future closer with an upper-90s fastball and a low-90s cutter. Right-hander Tyler Phillips, a 16th-rounder as a New Jersey high schooler, had the best 2018 season of any starter in the system, leading the low Class A South Atlantic League in wins (11) while placing third in the Minors in K/BB ratio (7.9) and fourth in walk rate (1.1 per nine innings).

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- The Rangers found more than their share of intriguing arms deep in the 2015 Draft. Left-hander Jeffrey Springs, a 30th-rounder out of Appalachian State, jumped from low Class A to the big leagues this year and was one of Texas' most effective relievers in the last two months of the season.

Lefty C.D. Pelham, who lasted until the 33rd round because he couldn't throw strikes at Spartanburg Methodist (S.C.) JC, pitched in the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game in July and debuted in Arlington in September. He looks like a future closer with an upper-90s fastball and a low-90s cutter. Right-hander Tyler Phillips, a 16th-rounder as a New Jersey high schooler, had the best 2018 season of any starter in the system, leading the low Class A South Atlantic League in wins (11) while placing third in the Minors in K/BB ratio (7.9) and fourth in walk rate (1.1 per nine innings).

Rangers Top 30 prospects

Righty DeMarcus Evans has yet to generate as much prospect hype as that trio, though that may be about to change. A 25th-round pick out of Petal (Miss.) High -- a program that already has produced a pair of big leaguers in Nate Rolison and Evans' cousin, Anthony Alford -- he was spectacular after Texas made him a full-time reliever in 2018.

Arizona Fall League overviews for all 30 teams

Evans led all Minor League relievers (minimum 50 innings) in strikeout rate by averaging 16.6 per nine innings. He whiffed 103 in 56 frames at low Class A Hickory while posting a 1.77 ERA and holding opponents to a feeble .147/.257/.215 line. Now he's in the Arizona Fall League, getting more innings and refining his control as the Rangers try to expedite his development.

Evans had trouble finding the strike zone while serving as a starter for most of his first three pro seasons, walking 83 in 126 1/3 innings. Simplifying things with shorter stints and a condensed repertoire made a huge difference, even if he wasn't initially thrilled about the move to the bullpen.

"I started the last two years and my consistency was kind of off a little bit," Evans said. "When they told me I was relieving, I wasn't happy at first. But then I was like it's an opportunity for me to get better, so I did it and I guess it helped me out a lot."

He got better as the season progressed, allowing just two runs in his final 21 outings with a 68/8 K/BB ratio in 34 innings. He showed the ability to miss bats with two pitches, a mid-90s fastball with explosive life and a 12-to-6 curveball. Along with his stuff, his 6-foot-5, 275-pound frame makes him an imposing figure on the mound.

Rangers hitters in the Fall League

Charles Leblanc, 2B/3B -- A 2016 fourth-rounder from Pittsburgh, Leblanc initially impressed the Rangers with his ability to make contact and his defense, then began hitting for more power this year as he got more aggressive at the plate. He batted .274/.349/.412 with 10 homers in high Class A.

Julio Pablo Martinez, OF -- After falling short in the race to sign Shohei Ohtani last offseason, Texas used its leftover international bonus pool money to land Martinez for $2.8 million in March. The Cuban defector has well above-average speed and the potential for solid tools across the board with the exception of his arm. He hit .266/.378/.457 with nine homers and 13 steals in his 67-game pro debut, mostly at short-season Spokane.

Josh Morgan, C/INF -- Selected as a shortstop in 2014's third round out of a California high school, Morgan is a versatile defender whose best attribute is his ability to make consistent contact at the plate. He batted .227/.301/.309 with three homers in 83 games this year, mostly in Double-A. He played briefly in the AFL last fall, going 12-for-28 (.429) with two homers in eight games.

Rangers pitchers in the Fall League

Joe Barlow, RHP -- A right-hander/catcher at Salt Lake (Utah) CC selected in the 11th round in 2016, Barlow has focused on pitching in pro ball and shows a mid-90s fastball, a curveball with depth and a splitter/changeup. He led low Class A South Atlantic League in opponent average (.118) and ranked third in strikeout rate (13.9 per nine innings) while compiling a 1.68 ERA.

C.D. Pelham, LHP -- Pelham lasted until the 33rd round in 2015 because of his severe control woes at Spartanburg Methodist (S.C.) JC, but he has blossomed into an overpowering reliever with a fastball that reaches 99 mph and a cutter in the low 90s. He posted a 3.66 ERA with 53 strikeouts in 46 2/3 Minor League innings, then made 10 appearances with a 7.04 ERA in Texas.

Tai Tiedemann, RHP -- A former quarterback at famed Long Beach Poly High, Tiedemann signed as a 2016 eighth-rounder out of Long Beach CC. Armed with a low-90s fastball and a cutter slider, he recorded a 4.84 ERA with 49 strikeouts in 57 2/3 innings at Spokane.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

Pipeline names Rangers' Prospects of the Year

MLB.com

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers had a number of bright spots in their farm system this past season, but outfielder Scott Heineman and pitcher Tyler Phillips were at the top of the list.

Both have had to overcome their share of adversity in their young professional careers, but in 2018 they showed they have bright futures in the Rangers' organization. Heineman and Phillips were the Rangers' Hitting and Pitching Prospects of the Year.

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers had a number of bright spots in their farm system this past season, but outfielder Scott Heineman and pitcher Tyler Phillips were at the top of the list.

Both have had to overcome their share of adversity in their young professional careers, but in 2018 they showed they have bright futures in the Rangers' organization. Heineman and Phillips were the Rangers' Hitting and Pitching Prospects of the Year.

Each team's Hitting and Pitching Prospects of the Year were chosen by the MLB Pipeline staff. To receive consideration, players must have spent at least half the year in the Minors and appeared on the team's Top 30 Prospects list.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

Heineman was not a surprise. He was an 11th-round pick out of the University of Oregon in 2015 and did not play that season while recovering from foot surgery. From that slow start, though, he has moved quickly through the system and, after two strong years at Class A Advanced High Desert and Double-A Frisco, was invited to big league camp last spring.

He wasn't a candidate for the big league roster, but is definitely on the radar. He was promoted to Triple-A Round Rock after just seven games at Frisco and hit .295/.355/.429 with 20 doubles, 11 home runs, 57 RBIs and 16 stolen bases.

"I saw a guy who had a really good year offensively and matured a lot at the Triple-A level," Triple-A manager Jason Wood said. "When he came to us two weeks into the season, he brought a lot of energy when we needed it, and continued that all season. He stayed in the middle of the lineup all season and did a good job scoring runs, stealing bases, hitting for average."

Video: CLE@TEX: Heineman's solo homer gives Rangers the lead

The Rangers put a premium on versatility and Heineman showed that by playing all three outfield positions for Round Rock. He had 48 starts in right, 43 in center and 13 in left. That versatility could be appealing when the Rangers put together an outfield next spring.

"Defensively he's got a few things to work on, but this is a guy who can play all three positions," Wood said. "Right field is his best, but I have no problem putting him in center. He can cover ground and has a good arm. I wouldn't be surprised if he comes into camp next year with a chance to make the team."

Phillips was a 16th-round pick out of high school in 2015. He was just 17 when drafted and his first few years were rough. He was 1-2 with a 6.39 ERA in seven games for Class A Hickory in 2017 and ended up getting demoted to Class A Short-Season Spokane. It was there that he started blossoming, going 4-1 with a 2.38 ERA in his last eight starts.

He carried that over to Class A Hickory this season, going 11-5 with a 2.67 ERA in 22 starts. He averaged 8.7 strikeouts per nine innings with a 1.02 WHIP.

"I think it is what got into Tyler Phillips at the end of last year," Rangers farm director Jayce Tingler said. "Three swing-and-miss pitches. He has always had good fastball command and a good changeup. The evolution of his curveball was a big pitch for him. And just maturing. He was one of the youngest guys out of the Draft a few years ago, as a 17-year-old."

Phillips made one start at Class A Down East and that could be where he begins next season. His ability to eventually make the crucial jump to Double-A Frisco will be most telling, but the Rangers believe a strong pitching prospect has emerged in their system.

"We see him as a Major League starter and continue on that route," Tingler said. "I don't know his ceiling, is he a No. 2 or a No. 3? I don't think we know yet at his age and development. I just know we believe he has a chance to log innings as a starter and be a successful Major League pitcher."

T.R. Sullivan has covered the Rangers since 1989, and for MLB.com since 2006. Follow him on Twitter @Sullivan_Ranger and listen to his podcast.

Texas Rangers

Rangers conduct first managerial interviews

MLB.com

ARLINGTON -- Rangers farm director Jayce Tingler was the first candidate to be interviewed for their managerial opening.

The Rangers also interviewed Cubs bench coach Brandon Hyde and Astros bench coach Joe Espada this week as they begin the search for a replacement for Jeff Banister.

ARLINGTON -- Rangers farm director Jayce Tingler was the first candidate to be interviewed for their managerial opening.

The Rangers also interviewed Cubs bench coach Brandon Hyde and Astros bench coach Joe Espada this week as they begin the search for a replacement for Jeff Banister.

Tingler just finished his 12th season with the Rangers and interviewed for the job on Tuesday. He has served as a Minor League manager, field coordinator and Major League coach before taking his current job as assistant general manager and farm director.

Hyde, who interviewed on Thursday, managed in the Marlins' organization from 2005-09 before becoming their Minor League field coordinator. He has since worked as a Major League coach for the Marlins and Cubs.

Espada also has roots in the Marlins' organization as a Minor League hitting coasch in 2006-07 and then as Minor League coordinator. He was the Marlins' third-base coach from 2010-13. He was a coach with the Yankees before becoming the Astros' bench coach this past season.

Tingler and Hyde interviewed in person. Espada did his interview by phone on Thursday as the Astros are getting ready for the American League Championship Series against the Red Sox.

The Rangers are still finalizing the list of candidates they want to interview. Interim manager Don Wakamatsu is also expected to be considered.

The Rangers' job came open when Banister was dismissed after four seasons, which included American League West Division titles in 2015-16. The Rangers are among six teams looking for a manager, along with Angels, Twins, Reds, Blue Jays and Orioles.

The Rangers have issued no timetable for naming a manager. They have tentatively planned their annual organizational meetings for Oct. 22-25 in Surprise, Ariz., and the Major League General Manager Meetings are Nov. 6-8 in California.

There is a possibility that certain candidates could be brought back for a second round of interviews.

T.R. Sullivan has covered the Rangers since 1989, and for MLB.com since 2006. Follow him on Twitter @Sullivan_Ranger and listen to his podcast.

Texas Rangers

Every club's best individual playoff performance

From MadBum to Mr. October, these runs went down in franchise lore
MLB.com

One of the many joys of baseball's postseason is how one player can make such an outsized difference. There's no better time for a player to go on a hot streak than in the playoffs, when he's able to carry his team for a whole series -- maybe even to a championship. Baseball is a game of ebbs and flows, of zeniths and nadirs, and everyone wants to break out and have a heater in October.

With that in mind, we look at the greatest postseason runs by a player on each of baseball's 30 teams. These are the sort of streaks that make legends in their hometowns ... the sort of runs we'll talk about forever.

One of the many joys of baseball's postseason is how one player can make such an outsized difference. There's no better time for a player to go on a hot streak than in the playoffs, when he's able to carry his team for a whole series -- maybe even to a championship. Baseball is a game of ebbs and flows, of zeniths and nadirs, and everyone wants to break out and have a heater in October.

With that in mind, we look at the greatest postseason runs by a player on each of baseball's 30 teams. These are the sort of streaks that make legends in their hometowns ... the sort of runs we'll talk about forever.

Note: We're sticking to the divisional era here, which goes back to 1969, and is the dawn of the modern postseason.

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Blue Jays: Paul Molitor, 1993
.447/.527/.851, World Series MVP
Everyone remembers the Joe Carter homer, but Molitor was a monster that whole postseason for the Blue Jays at the age of 37. He was terrific back in 1982 for the Brewers, too.

Orioles: Brooks Robinson, 1970
.485/.471/.788, World Series MVP
This was, of course, the same World Series in which he made the ridiculous play at third base … though with Robinson, it's always a question of which ridiculous play.

Video: #WeKnowPostseason: Robinson's Play

Rays: James Shields, 2008
2-2, 25 IP, 2.88 ERA
This is where the "Big Game James" nickname came from, even if it maybe lasted a year or two longer than it should have.

Red Sox: David Ortiz, 2004
.400/.515/.764, ALCS MVP
It's rather difficult, all told, to figure out which Ortiz postseason to pick: He had an OPS over 1.204 in October for all three of the Red Sox championship teams he played for.

Video: 2004 ALCS Gm7: Ortiz's homer gives Red Sox early lead

Yankees: Reggie Jackson, 1978
.417/.511/.806
The highest qualified OPS by Yankees are, in fact, 2018 Aaron Judge and 2006 Derek Jeter ... but how do you not pick Mr. October?

AL CENTRAL

Indians: Orel Hershiser, 1995
4-1, 35 1/3 IP, 1.53 ERA, ALCS MVP
The season with the other Indians' World Series loss -- no, the other one -- featured vintage Hershiser ... and he split a couple of duels with Greg Maddux in the World Series, too.

Royals: Danny Jackson, 1985
2-1, 26 IP, 1.04 ERA
Bret Saberhagen is remembered as the hero of this Royals team -- along with Don Denkinger, of course -- but Jackson was actually the best pitcher for the Royals that postseason.

Tigers: Alan Trammell, 1984
.419/.500/.806, World Series MVP
Trammell put the perfect capper on the Tigers' dream season. This was a quiet argument for Trammell's Hall of Fame candidacy.

Twins: Jack Morris, 1991
4-0, 36 1/3 IP, 2.23 ERA, World Series MVP
Speaking of the Hall of Fame ... this postseason is almost certainly why Morris currently has a plaque in Cooperstown.

Video: 1991 WS Gm7: Morris' 10-inning shutout

White Sox: Jermaine Dye, 2005
.311/.415/.444, World Series MVP
Several White Sox players had a higher OPS than Dye that postseason -- including Joe Crede, Scott Podsednik and Paul Konerko -- but you've got to go with the World Series MVP.

AL WEST

Angels: Francisco Rodriguez, 2002
5-1, 18 2/3 IP, 1.93 ERA
Back when there were more rigid bullpen roles, K-Rod was deployed liberally and devastatingly in 2002, back when he was 20 years old.

Astros: Carlos Beltran, 2004
.435/.536/1.022
Cardinals fans will be having nightmares about 2004 Carlos Beltran for decades to come ... and they won that series.

Video: 2004 NLCS Gm4: Beltran hits eighth homer of playoffs

Athletics: Dave Stewart, 1989
4-0, 32 IP, 2.25 ERA, World Series MVP
Stewart had a career 2.77 postseason ERA in 133 innings ... he would actually win the ALCS MVP the very next season, too.

Mariners: Ken Griffey Jr., 1995
.364/.442/.818
Jay Buhner was just as good as The Kid in 1995 ... but Griffey is Griffey.

Rangers: Juan Gonzalez, 1996
.438/.526/1.375
The Rangers actually lost this Division Series in four games, but good heavens, was Juan Gone ever a monster, hitting five homers in four games.

Video: 1996 ALDS Gm4: Juan Gonzalez's fifth home run of ALDS

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

Braves: John Smoltz, 1996
4-1, 38 IP, 0.95 ERA
You could also go with Greg Maddux's 1995 run -- since the Braves won the World Series that year, after all -- and you wouldn't be wrong.

Marlins: Josh Beckett, 2003
2-2, 42 2/3 IP, 2.11 ERA, World Series MVP
After the Yankees and Red Sox had their first of two epic postseason battles, Beckett was happy to pick up the pieces in the World Series.

Video: WS Gm6: Beckett shuts out Yanks as Marlins win series

Mets: Bobby Ojeda, 1986
2-0, 27 IP, 2.33 ERA
Of all the great Mets starters on that team, it was Ojeda who had the best postseason.

Nationals: Stephen Strasburg, 2017
1-1, 14 IP, 0.00 ERA
Since we're excluding the Expos -- if we weren't, Steve Rogers in 1981 would be the obvious answer here -- we must dig into the gruesome land of the Nationals' postseason failures. Strasburg has the ultimate Nationals playoff line: 0 earned runs, 1 loss.

Video: WSH@CHC Gm4: Strasburg K's 12 over seven scoreless

Phillies: Cliff Lee, 2009
4-0, 40 1/3 IP, 1.56 ERA
Cole Hamels had the World Series MVP in '08, but Lee was actually better, in five more innings.

NL CENTRAL

Brewers: Ryan Braun, 2011
.405/.468/.714
This postseason performance feels like a lifetime ago, but it's one the Brewers sure would appreciate a repeat of.

Cardinals: David Freese, 2011
.397/.465/.794, NLCS MVP, World Series MVP
Freese actually struggled in the NLDS this season ... though he ended up making up for it.

Video: Must C Comeback: Freese's triple ties it up in ninth

Cubs: Jon Lester, 2016
3-1, 35 2/3 IP, 2.02 ERA, NLCS co-MVP
Lester still feels like the postseason starter Cubs fans trust most, and probably always will.

Pirates: Willie Stargell, 1979
.415/.435/.927, NLCS MVP, World Series MVP
He also shared the regular-season MVP Award this year, pulling off the rare trifecta.

Reds: Johnny Bench, 1976
.444/.464/.926, World Series MVP
Bench was as dominant as the Reds were in this matter-of-fact World Series sweep.

NL WEST

D-backs: Curt Schilling, 2001
4-0, 48 1/3 IP, 1.12 ERA, World Series co-MVP
Randy Johnson's line this exact 2001 postseason: 5-1, 41 1/3 IP, 1.52 ERA. That is ... difficult to beat.

Video: WS2001 Gm4: Schilling comes up clutch on short rest

Dodgers: Hershiser, 1988
3-0, 1 SV, 42 2/3 IP, 1.05 ERA, NLCS MVP, World Series MVP
Hershiser is the only pitcher to be on this list twice ... and how could he not be?

Giants: Madison Bumgarner, 2014
4-1, 1 SV, 52 2/3 IP, 1.03 ERA, NLCS MVP, World Series MVP
This is an obvious pick, but at this point I'd like to remind you that Barry Bonds put up a .356/.581/.978 in 2002.

Video: WS2014 Gm7: Bumgarner sets postseason innings record

Padres: Sterling Hitchcock, 1998
3-0, 22 IP, 1.23 ERA, NLCS MVP
He gave up only one earned run in six innings in his lone World Series start ... not that it did the Padres much good.

Rockies: Kaz Matsui, 2007
.304/.347/.500
It was a strange postseason for the Rockies in 2007, but if you forget the World Series happened altogether, it was a glorious one.

Will Leitch is a columnist for MLB.com.

Here's what happened in Thursday's AFL action

MLB.com

Here's a team-by-team breakdown of how all 30 teams' prospects fared in Arizona Fall League action on Thursday:

Gameday: Surprise 10, Glendale 9 | Salt River 7, Scottsdale 6 | Mesa 10, Peoria 9

Here's a team-by-team breakdown of how all 30 teams' prospects fared in Arizona Fall League action on Thursday:

Gameday: Surprise 10, Glendale 9 | Salt River 7, Scottsdale 6 | Mesa 10, Peoria 9

AL East

Blue Jays
Blue Jays No. 9 prospect Cavan Biggio went 0-for-2, but walked four times and drove in a run. Right-hander Zach Jackson recorded four strikeouts while allowing one hit in 1 1/3 innings of relief for Surprise.

2018 Arizona Fall League rosters

Orioles
Orioles No. 12 prospect Ryan McKenna went 2-for-4 with two runs and a walk out of the leadoff spot for Glendale. One of the hits was a double, McKenna's second extra-base hit in as many games after he tripled on Wednesday. Starter Chris Lee gave up one hit over two scoreless innings, while righty Jay Flaa worked 1 1/3 scoreless frames despite issuing four walks. Tyler Erwin also struggled with his control as he allowed one earned run on three walks and two hit batsmen.

Rays
Shortstop Lucius Fox, the Rays' No. 9 prospect, connected on a three-run home run in the eighth inning en route to his second straight two-hit game for Peoria. He scored two runs, walked once and stole a base, finishing 2-for-4. Joe McCarthy (No. 17) also reached base twice, going 1-for-3 with a walk and an RBI. On the mound, right-hander Phoenix Sanders allowed five runs (four earned) on five hits, two walks and two balks in 1 1/3 innings, while Brandon Lawson took the loss after giving up a sacrifice fly in the 10th inning.

Red Sox
Esteban Quiroz put Mesa on the board with a third-inning solo homer and reached base five times, going 2-for-3 with three runs scored, three walks and an RBI. Mike Shawaryn, Boston's No. 9 prospect, tossed 1 1/3 hitless innings in relief.

Yankees
Steven Sensley plated a pair of runs with a double and finished 2-for-5 for Glendale. Hobie Harris posted 2 1/3 innings of one-run ball in relief, while Matt Wivinis recorded an out late in the game.

AL Central

Indians
Indians No. 6 prospect Yu Chang went 1-for-5 and logged his second start at third base for Glendale. Hard-throwing righty Dalbert Siri scuffled in relief, allowing three earned runs on three hits and a walk in one inning.

Royals
Royals No. 2 prospect Khalil Lee went 2-for-3 with two RBIs, two walks and a stolen base from the bottom of Surprise's lineup. Catcher Meibrys Viloria also made an impact with a 1-for-4 performance that included a two-run double and two walks. Grant Gavin recorded the save despite allowing an unearned run on one hit.

Tigers
Daniel Pinero and Daniel Woodrow each collected two hits, an RBI and a steal for Mesa. Eduardo Jimenez was sharp in relief, striking out a pair of hitters over two perfect frames, though Tigers No. 26 prospect Sandy Baez was hammered for five earned runs on five hits in two-thirds of an inning.

Twins
Twins No. 19 prospect Luke Raley went 0-for-4, but walked twice and scored a run for Salt River. Hector Lujan gave up three runs and retired only two hitters. Jaylin Davis went 2-for-5. Adam Bray picked up the win for Salt River with two hitless innings.

White Sox
White Sox No. 4 prospect Luis Robert (No. 44 overall) went 2-for-5 with an RBI and three runs scored. He's hit safely in all three games so far for Glendale. Outfielder Luis Alexander Basabe (No. 9) and shortstop Laz Rivera (No. 28) each drew a walk, but collectively finished 0-for-7. More »

AL West

A's
Outfielder Luis Barrera scored the walk-off run in the 10th for Mesa to cap a 1-for-4 game in which he scored two runs, walked twice and stole a base. Right-hander Calvin Coker retired all four batters he faced in relief, striking out one.

Angels
Brett Hanewich pitched around a pair of walks as he struck out the side in the 10th to earn his second win in as many outings for Mesa.

Astros
Astros No. 8 prospect J.B. Bukauskas threw 3 1/3 innings in a start for Scottsdale. The right-hander yielded one unearned run that scored on a passed ball, but was lights-out otherwise. He gave up three hits, struck out five and walked one. Abraham Toro-Hernandez (No. 21) went 2-for-5 with a double and an RBI. Trent Thornton (No. 24) followed Bukauskas and gave up two runs on two hits. Ronnie Dawson went 0-for-3, but walked three times. Erasmo Pinales gave up two hits but also struck out two in a scoreless frame.

Mariners
Mariners No. 2 prospect Evan White has five RBIs through two games after his 1-for-3, three-RBI game for Peoria. Chris Mariscal also had a solid game, going 2-for-4 with two runs, while Matt Walker worked an inning in relief.

Rangers
Third baseman Charles Leblanc tallied two hits and two walks out of the No. 3 spot in Surprise's lineup. Starter Tai Tiedemann and reliever Joe Barlow both struggled as they allowed a combined eight earned runs on eight hits over 4 2/3 innings. Rangers No. 15 prospect C.D. Pelham tossed a scoreless inning to earn the win.

NL East

Braves
Braves No. 6 prospect Christian Pache (No. 66 overall) went 1-for-5, but also grounded into a pair of double plays, while outfielder Izzy Wilson scored a run from the No. 2 spot in Peoria's lineup. Jeremy Walker was effective as he completed three innings of one-run ball in his first AFL start. He was relieved by Braves No. 12 prospect Kyle Muller, who struck out a pair but allowed one run on two hits and two walks in one inning.

Marlins
Marlins No. 16 prospect Jordan Yamamoto was impressive in his start for Salt River. The right-hander racked up five strikeouts, including each of the final two batters he faced, over three scoreless innings. Kyle Keller followed Yamamoto and gave up two runs -- via a two-run homer -- in 1 1/3 innings. Chad Smith was the third Marlins farmhand to toe the rubber, and he cruised through 1 2/3 scoreless innings. He issued one walk and didn't give up a hit. Tommy Eveld put together a scoreless outing as he threw 1 1/3 innings. Brian Miller (No. 11) was inserted as a pinch-runner. Bryson Brigman (No. 26) went 1-for-4.

Mets
Mets No. 2 prospect Peter Alonso turned in a multi-hit effort for the third straight day for Scottsdale. After his 2-for-4 night, Alonso is 7-for-12 through three games. Joe Zanghi cruised through his one inning on the mound, yielding one hit in a scoreless frame. Andres Gimenez (No. 1) entered the game as a pinch-runner and drew a walk in his only plate appearance. Ali Sanchez (No. 25) went 0-for-1. Gerson Bautista gave up one hit over two scoreless innings, and Matt Blackham took the loss after he gave up an unearned run in the bottom of the 11th.

Nationals
Nationals No. 2 prospect Carter Kieboom picked up a pair of hits, including a triple, and scored a run as part of his 2-for-6 night for Salt River. Daniel Johnson (No. 10) went 1-for-5.

Phillies
For Scottsdale, Darick Hall went 2-for-5, including a two-run homer, his first long ball of the Fall League.

NL Central

Brewers
Catcher Mario Feliciano, Milwaukee's No. 23 prospect, went 1-for-3 with an RBI, two runs scored and two walks in his first AFL game. Weston Wilson went 1-for-5 with an RBI double, but also committed two errors at third base.

Cardinals
Tommy Edman was a catalyst out of the leadoff spot for Surprise with his 2-for-4, three-walk performance. He also drove in a run, scored once and swiped a pair of bases. Jeremy Martinez also tallied a hit, while Lane Thomas reached base on a pair of walks.

Cubs
Cubs No. 29 prospect Trent Giambrone paced Mesa's offense as he went 4-for-6 with two RBIs and one run scored. 2018 first-rounder Nico Hoerner (No. 6) went 0-for-5, but picked up an RBI in his second Fall League contest. PJ Higgins didn't collect a hit, but drove in a run and walked twice. Starting pitcher Justin Steele (No. 8) was tagged for four earned runs and five hits in 1 2/3 innings, while lefty Manuel Rondon permitted one walk over two hitless frames in relief.

Pirates
Pirates No. 5 prospect Cole Tucker drove in three runs and stole two bases in a 2-for-5 showing for Surprise. Bryan Reynolds (No. 8) also collected two hits, going 2-for-5 with two runs, while Will Craig (No. 16) scored a run after entering as a pinch-hitter.

Reds
Reds No. 3 prospect Taylor Trammell went 1-for-5 for Scottsdale. Shed Long (No. 8) picked up a hit as a pinch-hitter, while Alfredo Rodriguez (No. 23) went 2-for-4.

NL West

D-backs
D-backs No. 4 prospect Pavin Smith came through with an RBI single as part of a 1-for-4 night for Salt River. Daulton Varsho (No. 5) went 1-for-4 with an RBI and Drew Ellis (No. 9) went 1-for-5 with a two-run homer.

Dodgers
Dodgers No. 2 prospect Keibert Ruiz (No. 39 overall) went 1-for-3 with two walks and an RBI for Glendale. Errol Robinson (No. 20) also had a strong game, going 2-for-4 with a double, two RBIs and a stolen base, while designated hitter Cody Thomas contributed by scoring one run. On the mound, relievers Nolan Long and Andre Scrubb allowed a combined five runs (three earned) on three hits and three walks.

Giants
Giants No. 10 prospect Heath Quinn went 0-for-5 for Scottsdale. C.J. Hinojosa (No. 28) went 0-for-6. Chase Johnson gave up three runs on three hits in one inning. Matt Winn went 0-for-4 with four strikeouts.

Padres
Padres No. 13 prospect Buddy Reed went 1-for-5 and scored a run for Peoria. Left-hander Travis Radke recorded three strikeouts and three walks as he allowed an unearned run on two hits in 2 2/3 innings of relief.

Rockies
Rockies No. 11 prospect Tyler Nevin reached base four times (3-for-5 with a walk) and drove in a run for Salt River. Justin Lawrence (No. 17) gave up one unearned run in one inning, but he avoided a big inning by inducing a 1-2-3 double play when he was stuck in a bases-loaded, no-outs jam. Josh Fuentes was inserted into the game as a pinch-runner.

Each team's greatest postseason moment

The most memorable October event of the divisional era for every club
MLB.com

There are just four teams remaining in this year's postseason, but every fan, even those of the Mariners (the team with the longest postseason drought, now up to 17 seasons), can relate to what it feels like to be in the playoffs. The late nights, the constant tension, the stakes so high you can barely breathe ... and when something wonderful happens, the release and the pure, unbridled jubilation.

With that in mind, we take a look at the greatest postseason moments of the division era. Even if your team isn't a postseason team, you can remember your great October moments … and if it is, you can dream of maybe having another one this month that's even better.

There are just four teams remaining in this year's postseason, but every fan, even those of the Mariners (the team with the longest postseason drought, now up to 17 seasons), can relate to what it feels like to be in the playoffs. The late nights, the constant tension, the stakes so high you can barely breathe ... and when something wonderful happens, the release and the pure, unbridled jubilation.

With that in mind, we take a look at the greatest postseason moments of the division era. Even if your team isn't a postseason team, you can remember your great October moments … and if it is, you can dream of maybe having another one this month that's even better.

(For the purpose of this exercise, we are going back to 1969, which is the start of divisional play and the birth of the postseason as we know it.)

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Blue Jays: Joe Carter's World Series walk-off, Oct. 23, 1993
The Blue Jays might not have that many postseason moments, but the greatness of this one more than makes up for that. Runner-up: Jose Bautista's ALDS Game 5 bat flip, Oct. 14, 2015.

Video: 93 WS, GM 6, PHI@TOR: Joe Carter touches them all

Orioles: Brooks Robinson's incredible play, 1970 World Series, Oct. 10, 1970
The best part about this play, which might be the greatest defensive play in World Series history, is how surprised the umpire looks. Even he can't believe what he just saw. Runner-up: David McNally's grand slam, World Series Game 3, Oct. 13, 1970.

Rays: First and only World Series trip clinched, Oct. 19, 2008
A decade ago, and still pretty jaw-dropping that all this happened. Runner-up: Grant Balfour strikes out Ken Griffey Jr. to clinch the first ALDS victory, Oct. 6, 2008.

Red Sox: First World Series title since 1918, Oct. 27, 2004
You might remember when this happened. (It's when lifelong Red Sox fans Jimmy Fallon and Drew Barrymore got on television.) Runner-up: David Ortiz's ALCS grand slam vs. the Tigers sent a cop joyous in the bullpen and turns the series around on Oct. 13, 2013.

Video: Must C Classic: Red Sox win first WS since 1918

Yankees: Reggie Jackson's three homers in 1977 World Series
There's a reason no one else gets to be called "Mr. October." Runner-up: Mr. November -- Derek Jeter's World Series Game 5 walk-off homer on Nov. 1, 2001.

Video: 1977 WS Gm6: Reggie becomes Mr. October

AL CENTRAL

Indians: Eddie Murray's walk-off, Game 3, 1995 World Series, Oct. 24, 1995
It was Cleveland's first World Series game in 41 years, and ended with a Hall of Famer sending the crowd into euphorics. Runner-up: Rajai Davis' home run off Aroldis Chapman, 2016 World Series, Nov. 2, 2016

Royals: Royals win 2015 World Series, Nov. 1, 2015
It was a magical season and a magical World Series that just seems more improbable each year that goes by. Runner-up: The Don Denkinger play, and aftermath, 1985 World Series, Oct. 26, 1985.

Tigers: Magglio Ordonez sends Tigers to World Series, Oct. 14, 2006
The sounds that crowd makes the minute the bat meets the ball still gives you chills 12 years later. Runner-up: Kirk Gibson's Game 5 homer, 1984 World Series.

Twins: Kirby Puckett's Game 6 walk-off, 1991 World Series, Oct. 26, 1991
The original "We Will See You Tomorrow Night." Runner-up: Twins win 1987 World Series, their first in Minnesota, Oct. 25, 1987.

Video: Must C Classic: Puckett crushes a walk-off homer

White Sox: White Sox win 2005 World Series, Oct. 26, 2015
A game that was razor-tight, in a series that was much closer than anyone remembers. Runner-up: Scott Podsednik's Game 2 walk-off, Oct. 23, 2015.

AL WEST

Angels: Scott Spiezio's homer, Game 6, 2002 World Series, Oct. 26, 2002
The most Rally Monkey of all the Rally Monkey moments, his three-run clout cued the rally from a 5-0 deficit. Runner-up: Troy Percival gets last out to win 2002 World Series, Oct. 27, 2002.

Astros: Charlie Morton finishes the Dodgers off, 2017 World Series, Nov. 1, 2017
This was so long ago you might not remember it, but trust me, it was wonderful. Runner-up: Chris Burke sends everybody home after 18 innings, 2005 NLDS.

Video: WS2017 Gm7: Morton induces groundout to close out WS

Athletics: Eck closes out the 1989 World Series, October 28, 1989
When in doubt, go with the Hall of Famer closing out a series for an all-time great team. Runner-up: Joe Rudi's amazing catch, World Series Game 2, Oct. 14, 1973.

Mariners: Ken Griffey Jr. slides home to win the 1995 ALDS, Oct. 8, 1995
Basically, everything wonderful about the history of Mariners baseball, happening in one play. Runner-up: Mariners win most recent postseason series, 2001 ALDS over Cleveland.

Video: Griffey slides home to clinch the ALDS in 1995

Rangers: Neftali Feliz sends Texas to its first World Series, 2010 ALCS, Oct. 22, 2010
Over the hated Yankees, no less. Runner-up: Josh Hamilton's 2011 World Series Game 6 homer, which was this close to being one of the greatest baseball moments of recent memory.

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

Braves: Only World Series win in Atlanta, Oct. 28, 1995
It still seems amazing that this is the only one they ever got. Runner-up: The Sid Bream Slide, Oct. 14, 1992.

Marlins: Edgar Renteria's walk-off to win 1997 World Series, Oct. 26, 1997
Poor Cleveland. Runner-up: The Bartman play, and all that followed, 2003 NLCS.

Video: WS1997 Gm7: Fish win first WS on Renteria's walk-off

Mets: Mookie Wilson reaches base, Ray Knight scores, Mets win on Bill Buckner's error, Game 6, 1986 World Series, Oct. 25, 1986
A Mets comeback for the ages. Runner-up: Miracle Mets win 1969 World Series.

Video: 1986 World Series, Game 6: Red Sox at Mets

Nationals: Jayson Werth's 2012 NLDS walk-off, Oct. 11, 2012
After this, the Nats lost the series. But for the moment, it was great. Runner-up: Strasburg fans 12 to extend last year's NLDS.

Phillies: Brad Lidge gets the last out of a long game, 2008 World Series, Oct. 27, 2008
It took a couple of days for this game to actually finish, but no Phillies fan would ever complain. Runner-up: Roy Halladay's no-hitter, 2010 NLDS against Cincinnati.

NL CENTRAL

Brewers: Paul Molitor's inside-the-park homer, 1982 ALCS, Oct. 6, 1982
Runner-up: Nyjer Morgan's walk-off over Arizona in 2011 NLDS, particularly when called by Bob Uecker.

Cardinals: David Freese's triple to tie 2011 World Series Game 6, Oct. 27, 2011
The walk-off homer in the 11th gets more air time, but this was truly one of the most insane hits in World Series history. Runner-up: Ozzie Smith's 1985 NLCS homer off Tom Niedenfuer, the "Go Crazy, Folks" moment.

Video: WS2011 Gm6: Freese saves the Cards with a huge triple

Cubs: History in 2016
This was … not a tough call. Runner-up: Kyle Schwarber's shot atop the Wrigley scoreboard, Game 4, 2015 NLDS.

Video: Cubs win first World Series title in 108 years

Pirates: Willie Stargell's homer, 1979 World Series, Game 7, Oct. 17, 1979
And to do it in such beautiful threadsRunner-up: Pirates fans scare Johnny Cueto into dropping the ball, 2013 NL Wild Card Game at PNC Park.

Reds: Big Red Machine wins a Fall Classic for the ages, Oct. 22, 1975
It's only East Coast Bias that makes you think of Carlton Fisk when you think of this series. Runner-up: Reds sweep heavily favored A's in 1990 World Series.

NL WEST

D-backs: Luis Gonzalez off Mariano Rivera, 2001 World Series, Nov. 4, 2001
Ah, the perils of playing the infield in … Runner-up: Tony Womack's hit in 2001 NLDS.

Video: Must C Classic: Gonzalez walks off, wins World Series

Dodgers: Kirk Gibson pulls himself around the bases, 1988 World Series
Runner-up: Juan Uribe's 2013 go-ahead homer in Game 4 NLDS against Atlanta.

Video: Must C Classic: Gibson's 1988 WS walk-off home run

Giants: First World Series win in San Francisco, 2010 World Series, Nov. 1, 2010
Edgar Renteria hit .412 with two homers and six RBIs and the city got its first celebration. Runner-up: Madison Bumgarner's dominance in 2014 World Series.

Padres: Tony Gwynn's bad hop double, 1984 NLCS, Game 5, Oct. 7, 1984
The biggest hit of Gwynn's career was a bizarre one, but it got the job done. Runner-up: Padres finish off Braves to win 1998 NLCS.

Rockies: The Holliday slide, Oct. 1, 2007
He touched the plate … well, eventually. Maybe not technically the postseason either, but it came after Game 162. Runner-up: Rockies sweep D-backs to reach 2007 World Series.

Will Leitch is a columnist for MLB.com.

Inbox: Is Beltre candidate to be next manager?

Beat reporter T.R. Sullivan fields Rangers fans' questions
MLB.com

So how long until general manager Jon Daniels offers Adrian Beltre the manager's chair for next year? And do player-managers count against the 25- and 40-man rosters?
-- Bill F., Arlington

Beltre has expressed zero interest in managing. Besides, not sure how this bizarre fondness for charismatic ex-players with zero experience as a managerial candidate ever got started. There are too many ex-managers out there just alone who have won or been to the World Series. That someone is a candidate just because they sound good on television seems insulting to interim manager Don Wakamatsu, first-base coach Steve Buechele, third-base coach Tony Beasley and others with a long resume of invaluable experience that didn't involve sitting in front of a camera. Jeff Banister and Ron Washington both had that kind of experience, and both were excellent hires. Anybody who says otherwise is delving into revisionist history.

So how long until general manager Jon Daniels offers Adrian Beltre the manager's chair for next year? And do player-managers count against the 25- and 40-man rosters?
-- Bill F., Arlington

Beltre has expressed zero interest in managing. Besides, not sure how this bizarre fondness for charismatic ex-players with zero experience as a managerial candidate ever got started. There are too many ex-managers out there just alone who have won or been to the World Series. That someone is a candidate just because they sound good on television seems insulting to interim manager Don Wakamatsu, first-base coach Steve Buechele, third-base coach Tony Beasley and others with a long resume of invaluable experience that didn't involve sitting in front of a camera. Jeff Banister and Ron Washington both had that kind of experience, and both were excellent hires. Anybody who says otherwise is delving into revisionist history.

:: Submit a question to the Rangers Inbox ::

It's just interesting the number of former Rangers who are competing in the postseason this year. Why do Rangers go to other clubs and do better? Who is responsible for the failure to develop these players? Is it the manager or is it the general manager? Or both?
-- Jimmy G., Oklahoma City

It's always the same story when the Rangers are in contention. There is an abnormal frenzy for the club to make deals and reinforce the drive to postseason. When the trades get done, there is great rejoicing and self-congratulations. It is only much later that the collateral damage is assessed. But when opposing clubs acquire players from the Rangers, they usually have a good idea of what they are getting.

What current Minor League pitchers have a chance to make the 2019 team.
-- Larry F. Mansfield, Texas

Yohander Mendez, Ariel Jurado and Adrian Sampson are all candidates for the rotation. But all three need experience and have much to learn. They are going to take their lumps, so the big question is will the required patience be there to see them through it? Same way with young relievers like Connor Sadzeck, Jeffrey Springs, Zac Curtis, C.D. Pelham, Nick Gardewine and others who had their rough moments this season. Pedro Strop had a 7.24 ERA and a 1.90 WHIP with the Rangers in 2009-11 before being given away to the Orioles. He has a 2.61 ERA and a 1.03 WHIP over the past five years with the Cubs. That drops to 2.12 and 0.89 in the postseason.

I support Daniels and all his roster moves, but when will the Rangers shake the Chan Ho Park deal and sign a big-time starter? The Achilles' heel of this club has always been starting pitching. Sign Patrick Corbin and trade for another starter, please.
-- Nick V., Santa Clara, Calif.

Corbin would be a terrific signing for the Rangers. That would give them a rotation of Corbin and Mike Minor. Since Texas is in a drought, the necessary ensuing prayer for three days of rain is probably asking too much. The Rangers are in the same situation as last offseason -- actually it's worse -- in that they need to fill four spots in the rotation, not just one. When you have to buy in bulk, you need to purchase a lot of ground hamburger rather than spend a ton of money on one T-bone steak.

What is Mike Matuella's status? I noticed he wasn't appearing in any games for most of the second half of the season, but I don't remember hearing anything about an injury.
-- Brad M. Abilene, Texas

He had some elbow and shoulder pain, so the Rangers shut him down after July 7. The 24-year-old is currently healthy and pitching in instructional league. Matuella still has physical talent, and what is interesting is he has to be added to the 40-man roster this winter to be protected from the Rule 5 Draft. That will be an interesting decision for the Rangers, and a tantalizing possibility for nine other teams that lost at least 89 games this year and are exploring all avenues to speed up their rebuild.

Do we project Joey Gallo to improve on hitting? Do coaches and scouts think he can learn to drive the ball the other way and cut down the strikeouts? I like the power, but he is all or nothing.
-- Craig M. Mansfield, Texas

Before anybody gives up on Gallo, it would seem smart to anchor him at one position rather than moving him all over the field. That might do wonders for his offensive output.

T.R. Sullivan has covered the Rangers since 1989, and for MLB.com since 2006. Follow him on Twitter @Sullivan_Ranger and listen to his podcast.

Texas Rangers, Adrian Beltre, Joey Gallo

FAQs for Rangers' 2018-'19 offseason

Managerial search, Beltre's future among biggest concerns
MLB.com

ARLINGTON -- Many questions surround the Rangers this winter. Here are perhaps the most frequently asked questions going into the offseason.

What is the Rangers' timetable for manager?
The Rangers are in the process of compiling a list of candidates beyond interim manager Don Wakamatsu. The Rangers should announce the list in the next few days and then begin the interviews. They will likely come up with 2-3 finalists and have a second round of interviews. A manager will likely be named by the World Series.

ARLINGTON -- Many questions surround the Rangers this winter. Here are perhaps the most frequently asked questions going into the offseason.

What is the Rangers' timetable for manager?
The Rangers are in the process of compiling a list of candidates beyond interim manager Don Wakamatsu. The Rangers should announce the list in the next few days and then begin the interviews. They will likely come up with 2-3 finalists and have a second round of interviews. A manager will likely be named by the World Series.

What are the Rangers looking for as a manager?
This is how general manager Jon Daniels explained it on Tuesday: "We are looking for someone who will help us create an environment where people thrive in what they do on a very simple basis. Players, staff, everybody involved. So much of everybody's job -- certainly this job -- is managing people, personalities, egos, really developing relationships to where you get through them on a variety of different levels."

What is Adrian Beltre's timetable on a retirement decision?
Beltre said he is going home to Southern California to relax, spend time with the family and maybe go on vacation. At some point, he will take a week, consider his options and make a decision. The Rangers can't wait forever because they have to start executing an offseason plan, but Beltre is unlikely to keep them in suspense. Again, the most likely scenario is Beltre calling it a career.

Video: SEA@TEX: Beltre exits the game to a raucous ovation

Beltre is a free agent. Do the Rangers want to sign him?
That's an intriguing situation, considering that Jurickson Profar appears capable of playing every day at third base. If Beltre were to come back, it would likely be in a reduced role, and that might tough for him to accept.

More from Daniels: "We didn't talk to Adrian about what the role or what the opportunity would be here. I think, generally speaking without [knowing the roster], we would love to have Adrian back. At the time he has some thoughts and is ready to talk about it, we'll sit down and talk about what the opportunity looks like then. We haven't had that conversation yet."

What is Elvis Andrus' timetable?
Andrus could opt out of his contract and walk away from four years and $58 million. At some point, he will confer with his agent Scott Boras and get a clearer picture of his options.

Andrus wants to stay. At some point, Boras could talk with the Rangers about a possible restructuring of the contract that would keep Andrus from opting out.

Video: LAA@TEX: Andrus clubs a solo homer in the 4th

Who do the Rangers have club options on?
Catcher Robinson Chirinos and pitchers Matt Moore, Doug Fister and Martin Perez. The Rangers will pick up the option on Chirinos and decline on Fister and Moore.

Perez is the more intriguing decision. The option is for $7.5 million, and he had a poor year. But he is 28, healthy and talented. The Rangers are not in a position to discard starting position. All these decisions are due after the World Series.

Who are the Rangers' other free agents?
Pitchers Bartolo Colon and Yovani Gallardo. Colon is not expected back. If Gallardo comes back, it would likely be on a Minor League contract.

Who will the Rangers target in free agency?
They will consider every potential free-agent pitcher out there, whether it is a starter or a reliever. Beyond that, there are Adam Jones and A.J. Pollock, two right-handed hitting center fielders who could help balance out the Rangers' lineup. The caveat is they are both not elite defensive players.

What is the payroll going to be like?
The Rangers' payroll was approximately $133 million on Opening Day this season. It's unlikely to go much higher than that. That's one reason the Rangers need to hear from Beltre and why they may not be willing to pick up Perez's option.

Who is eligible for arbitration and who are the non-tender candidates?
Nomar Mazara, Profar, Alex Claudio and Delino DeShields. Matt Bush, Eddie Butler and Ryan Rua could be eligible under the Super Two category, depending on where the cutoff is on two-plus years of service time.

Mazara and Profar will be offered contracts. Claudio, Butler and Bush had rough seasons but again, the Rangers aren't in a position to discard pitching. It is time -- past time -- for Rua to get a chance to play elsewhere.

What about DeShields?
DeShields had an excellent defensive season, but was disappointing on the offensive side. He may still have a future with the Rangers, but here is what Daniels said about him on Tuesday: "Delino does some things really well ... hasn't done them consistently at this level yet. Talented guy … skillset we don't have exactly. He'll be in competition for a spot next spring."

Video: LAA@TEX: DeShields runs 98 ft. for catch at the wall

Who needs to be added to the 40-man and protected from the Rule 5 Draft?
From the Rangers' Top 30 prospects, as determined by MLB Pipeline, outfielder Scott Heineman and pitcher Taylor Hearn.

Pitchers Wei-Chieh Huang (who was acquired from the D-backs for Jake Diekman), Reed Garrett (who was in big league camp last spring), Brady Fiegl, Wes Benjamin, Edgar Arredondo, Emerson Martinez, Mike Matuella and Jake Lemoine are also eligible. However, Heineman and Hearn are the only locks on that list.

Who can be Minor League free agents?
Most notable is pitcher Chi Chi Gonzalez, who is finishing off his recovery from Tommy John surgery. Outfielder Preston Beck, who is from Dallas, is another, as is reliever Jairo Beras.

T.R. Sullivan has covered the Rangers since 1989, and for MLB.com since 2006. Follow him on Twitter @Sullivan_Ranger and listen to his podcast.

Texas Rangers, Elvis Andrus, Adrian Beltre, Delino DeShields, Nomar Mazara, Jurickson Profar

Daniels: Pitching's our missing link to postseason

Rangers GM says he might not go 'all in' this winter, but he'll find ways to win
MLB.com

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers believe they have a strong group of young position players who are ready to win and compete in the postseason.

The overwhelming issue facing the Rangers this winter is how to line up those players with the necessary pitching. That will be a daunting task.

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers believe they have a strong group of young position players who are ready to win and compete in the postseason.

The overwhelming issue facing the Rangers this winter is how to line up those players with the necessary pitching. That will be a daunting task.

"I don't think this is the winter we are going all in on the top free agents necessarily," general manager Jon Daniels said Tuesday. "That doesn't mean we can't find a number of ways to improve and we will.

"We are very aware of the competitive landscape. Our belief is we can take steps forward next year. I don't believe in the thought of tanking. That's not in our mindset. There are a lot of areas we can get better. We will get after it this offseason."

The Rangers appear to be on a rebuilding course. But Daniels is not ruling out the possibility of competing for the postseason next year.

"We want to give the team a chance to demonstrate at midseason and allow us to make decisions, one way or another," Daniels said. "If the team is in the mix in July … if your team has played well, we would always look to [upgrade through trade]. We are going to look to get better internally and externally in the offseason and see where we are in the summer."

Daniels admitted the Rangers were in a better situation with their pitching at the end of last season than they are this year. They went into last offseason able to build a rotation around Cole Hamels and Martin Perez, and had a group of proven relievers, including Keone Kela, Jake Diekman, Alex Claudio, Matt Bush and Tony Barnette.

This offseason, the only two pitchers guaranteed spots on next year's staff are starter Mike Minor and reliever Jose Leclerc.

Video: TEX@SEA: Leclerc strikes out Cruz to notch the save

The Rangers are back to buying bulk. Rookies Yohander Mendez, Ariel Jurado and Adrian Sampson made progress this year, but they will still have to compete for a job in Spring Training.

"All three guys will be in the mix for jobs but not guaranteed," Daniels said. "We will have some internal pitching ready to contribute, but more midseason and second half than guys really prepared to jump in on Opening Day."

The Rangers have pitching in the Minors, but Cole Ragans, Joe Palumbo, Kyle Cody, Alex Speas and Ronald Herrera are in various stages of recovery from major arm surgery while others like A.J. Alexy, Tyler Phillips, Hans Crouse, Jason Bahr and Yerry Rodriguez haven't advanced beyond Class A.

"We have to develop the group we have down below," Daniels said. "A lot of real positives, but that group is several years away. We are not going to rush them. To line things up with this group of position players, we are going to have to look outside."

There will be interesting names on the free-agent market, including Patrick Corbin, Dallas Keuchel, Charlie Morton and others, but it remains a difficult and expensive way to building a rotation. The top free-agent starting pitchers last winter were Jake Arrieta (10-11, 3.96), Yu Darvish (1-3, 4.95), Lance Lynn (10-10, 4.77), Jason Vargas (7-9, 5.77) and Alex Cobb (5-15, 4.90) and they all went through struggles.

"It's a challenge," Daniels said. "It's risky, but at the same time, you can make quality signings. There have been very productive pitching acquisitions. Minor for instance. Charlie Morton for the Astros, Jon Lester on a higher scale for the Cubs. You have to dig in, do your homework and make good evaluations."

Oakland won 97 games this season with a rotation that included Sean Manaea, Trevor Cahill, Edwin Jackson, Brett Anderson and others. Their pitching strength was in an outstanding bullpen.

"It is clearly a priority for us, both in traditional starting pitching and looking at the best way to build a staff," Daniels said. "In years past, teams were built with five strong starters. Look at some of the teams in postseason, they have advantages elsewhere. Starting pitching is still a priority. I don't want to downplay it, but there are multiple ways to go about it. We'll look at all of it."

Rangers beat 
• The Rangers have told assistant hitting coach Justin Mashore that he will not return next season. All other coaches are on hold until the Rangers complete the managerial search.

• Daniels said the Rangers have not finalized a list of candidates to interview for the manager's job. He made it clear that the ability to communicate with players will be a high priority.

• The Rangers have extended their working agreement with Class A Short Season Spokane in the Northwest League for two more years.

• Daniels said the Rangers are looking for a senior director of baseball operations to add to the front-office staff. There is a possibility that assistant general manager Jayce Tingler could go back to the Major League coaching staff.

Nomar Mazara had his right thumb examined by Dr. Thomas DiLiberti on Tuesday. DiLiberti reported that the ligament in the thumb is a little swollen but fully stable. That slight swelling should subside with rest in the next few weeks. No other treatment is necessary at this time.

T.R. Sullivan has covered the Rangers since 1989, and for MLB.com since 2006. Follow him on Twitter @Sullivan_Ranger and listen to his podcast.

Texas Rangers

30 top prospects in the AFL -- 1 from each team

MLB.com

The Arizona Fall League has long been a haven for the best prospects in all of baseball to come together and put the finishing touches on their development on the way to the big leagues. This year is no different, with 15 players from MLB Pipeline's Top 100 prospects list slated to play starting on Tuesday.

Seven clubs are sending their No. 1 prospect to the AFL, and each team is sending an impressive array of up-and-coming talent. Here is a list of the top prospect from each organization that fans can check out in AFL action next week.

The Arizona Fall League has long been a haven for the best prospects in all of baseball to come together and put the finishing touches on their development on the way to the big leagues. This year is no different, with 15 players from MLB Pipeline's Top 100 prospects list slated to play starting on Tuesday.

Seven clubs are sending their No. 1 prospect to the AFL, and each team is sending an impressive array of up-and-coming talent. Here is a list of the top prospect from each organization that fans can check out in AFL action next week.

AL East

Blue Jays: Vladimir Guerrero Jr., 3B (TOR No. 1; MLB No. 1)
Guerrero, the top prospect in this year's Fall League, batted .381 with 20 homers, 78 RBIs and more walks (42) than strikeouts (38) at 19 this season while ascending to Triple-A. He'll need to improve his defense at the hot corner to avoid a move down the positional spectrum, but it's a generational-type bat capable of shattering records this fall en route to a 2019 big league debut.

Orioles: Ryan McKenna, CF (BAL No. 12)
McKenna, 21, led all Orioles farmhands in average (.315), OBP (.410), hits (148) and runs scored (95) while splitting his season between Class A Advanced Frederick and Double-A Bowie. The 2015 fourth-rounder swung the bat particularly well in the Florida State League, hitting .377/.467/.556 with 97 hits over 67 games, and impressed with his center-field defense at both stops.

Rays: Lucius Fox, SS (TB No. 9)
The speedster Fox performed well in the Florida State League but scuffled during the final month of the season in Double-A after celebrating his 21st birthday. He ultimately posted a .692 OPS with 29 stolen bases across the two levels. In 2017, Fox finished with a .691 OPS and 30 steals.

Red Sox: Michael Chavis, 3B/1B (BOS No. 1; MLB No. 69)
After Chavis ranked third in the Minors with 68 extra-base hits and fifth with 31 homers last year, he missed the first 80 games of 2018 with a suspension for testing positive for a performance-enhancing substance during the offseason. When he returned, he batted .298/.391/.538 (mostly in Double-A) to continue to establish himself as one of the best power-hitting prospects in the game. His strong arm is an asset at third base.

Yankees: Estevan Florial, OF (NYY No. 2; MLB No. 45)
Florial played in Fall League a year ago, batting .286/.383/.414 for the Scottsdale Scorpions, and returns after losing half of the 2018 season to a right hamate injury. He has one of the highest ceilings in the league as a potential 30-30 player who can handle center field. Florial has well above-average raw power, speed and arm strength, though he'll have to prove he can make consistent contact at the plate.

2018 Arizona Fall League rosters

AL Central

Indians: Yu Chang, SS (CLE No. 6)
Spending his age-22 season with Triple-A Columbus, Chang produced a .256/.330/.411 line with 13 home runs while playing the bulk of his 127 games as a shortstop. He's improved defensively in every season and committed just nine errors in 94 games at short with Columbus. Now 23, Chang is back in Fall League this year after hitting .304 over 15 games with Mesa in 2017.

Royals: Khalil Lee, OF (KC No. 2)
Though Lee intrigued clubs as a high school left-hander with a low-90s fastball and a promising slider, the Royals preferred him as an outfielder and made him a full-time position player after taking him in 2016's third round. He has a chance to have solid or better tools across the board -- his arm strength is his best attribute -- and displays some of the best patience in Kansas City's system as well as the ability to fit anywhere in the outfield.

Tigers: Daz Cameron, OF (DET No. 8)
When the Tigers got Cameron from the Astros as part of the Justin Verlander trade late last season, he had turned in what looked like a breakout season. He kept it going in his first year with Detroit, playing across three levels and reaching Triple-A at age 21. Cameron was particularly strong during his Double-A stint with a .285/.367/.470 line to go along with 12 steals in 53 games.

Twins: Brent Rooker, OF (MIN No. 7)
After a stunning first summer of pro ball that saw Rooker reach the Florida State League and hit 18 homers in 62 games, any encore was bound to seem like a disappointment. Yes, the strikeout rate (26.4 pct) was a bit high, but he spent his first full season in Double-A and led the system in homers (22) and finished third in RBIs (79).

White Sox: Luis Robert, OF (CWS No. 4; MLB No. 44)
Shortly before international signing rules drastically changed, the White Sox spent $52 million ($26 million bonus, matching amount as a penalty for exceeding their bonus pool) in May 2017 to land Robert. Damaged ligaments in his left thumb limited him to 50 games this summer, but Robert's five-tool potential was obvious. He has electric bat speed, well above-average foot speed and the range and arm strength to play anywhere in the outfield.

AL West

A's: Eli White, INF (OAK No. 18)
White is coming off the season of his career as he hit .308/.388/.450 over 130 games with Double-A Midland. The 24-year-old, an 11th-round pick from the 2016 Draft, came up as a shortstop but added second and third base to his resume this season. In addition to the defensive versatility, White also showed some increased power this season as he hit nine homers, more than double his previous career high of four.

Angels: Jahmai Jones, OF (LAA No. 4)
Things didn't exactly go according to plan for Jones in his third full season of pro ball, as he saw his batting average and OPS drop considerably from 2017. On the plus side, his walk rate did go up, and he reached double digits in home runs (10) and steals (24) while reaching Double-A before his 21st birthday. Jones did all that while making the transition from the outfield to second base.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

Astros: Forrest Whitley, RHP (HOU No. 2; MLB No. 8)
MLBPipeline's highest-rated pitching prospect, Whitley worked just 26 1/3 innings this season because of a 50-game suspension for violating the Minor League drug program and oblique and lat injuries. When he did take the mound, Whitley continued to show the ability to miss bats with four pitches: a lively mid-90s fastball, a 12-to-6 curveball, a power slider and a fading changeup.

Mariners: Evan White, 1B (SEA No. 2)
The Mariners' 2017 first-rounder was a force during the second half as he slashed .320/.400/.512 with eight home runs, 16 doubles and 40 RBIs over his final 64 games in the California League. He's yet to hit for much power, but there's a lot to like in White's ability to hit for average and get on base in addition to his near-elite defense at first base.

Rangers: Julio Pablo Martinez, OF (TEX No. 2; MLB No. 56)
When the Rangers failed to sign Shohei Ohtani, they used their surplus international bonus pool money to sign Martinez for $2.8 million in March. He's a well above-average runner who plays a fine center field, and he has more power than a typical 174-pounder thanks to his bat speed and strong hands and wrists. Unlike most Fall League players, Martinez has yet to play in a full-season league after spending most of his pro debut at short-season Spokane.

NL East

Braves: Cristian Pache, OF (ATL No. 6; MLB No. 68)
After taking a big step forward offensively in the Florida State League (.285/.311/.431), Pache earned a promotion to Double-A at age 19 in August. He held his own, especially at the outset, but finished the season 1-for-22. One of the best defensive outfield prospects in the game, a stint in Fall League will help Pache hit the ground running back in Double-A in 2018.

Marlins: Monte Harrison, OF (MIA No. 1)
The tooled-up Harrison improved his stock as much as any player in last year's Fall League, showing a power-speed combo that ultimately led to him being acquired from the Brewers in the offseason Christian Yelich trade. It was on display again in the 22-year-old's first Double-A campaign, as Harrison totaled 19 homers and 28 steals but also struck out in 36.9 percent of his plate appearances.

Mets: Andres Gimenez, SS (NYM No. 1; MLB No. 55)
The Mets don't shy away from pushing their young players aggressively, and Gimenez has responded, reaching Double-A before he turned 20 and putting up his best offensive numbers (.281/.347/.409) stateside. The 2018 Futures Gamer is a tremendous defender at a premium position, and while he likely will never have a ton of pop, he's starting to grow into more extra-base thump at the plate.

Nationals: Carter Kieboom, SS (WAS No. 2; MLB No. 39)
Keiboom was plagued by injuries during his first full season but put it all together this year to reach the Double-A level at age 20. Playing in 123 games across two levels, the 2016 first-round pick hit .280/.357/.444 with 16 home runs and 31 doubles.

Phillies: Arquimedes Gamboa, SS (PHI No. 11; MLB No. 21)
The Phillies have pushed Gamboa aggressively since signing him for $900,000 out of Venezuela in 2014, sending him to high Class A as a 20-year-old this season. Though he batted just .214/.304/.279, he's still a quality defender with good patience and promising power potential for a middle infielder.

NL Central

Brewers: Keston Hiura, 2B (MIL No. 1; MLB No. 30)
The best pure hitter in the 2017 Draft lived up to his reputation in his first full season by hitting .291 with 13 homers and 33 doubles while reaching Double-A in his first full season. The Brewers already have the 22-year-old second baseman on the fast track to the Major Leagues, and the hope is that he'll get a jumpstart on the 2019 season with a productive campaign in Fall League. Hiura also stands to benefit from additional work at second base after lingering issues with his throwing elbow limited him to DH duties for the first month-plus this season.

Cardinals: Conner Greene, RHP (STL No. 27)
In his first season with the Cardinals after coming over from the Blue Jays in the Randal Grichuk trade, Greene was so-so as a starter in Double-A. He improved somewhat with a move to the bullpen and a bump up to Triple-A and has the power repertoire to excel in that role. Greene'll continue to work on the transition to relief in Fall League while hoping to improve his command (6.4 BB/9 in 2018).

Cubs: Nico Hoerner, SS (CHC No. 6)
The Cubs' first-round pick (24th overall) in June, Hoerner is the top 2018 Draft pick playing in Arizona. Though he played just 14 games in his pro debut before straining ligaments in his left elbow while diving for a ball, that was long enough to show why scouts considered him one of the best offensive-minded middle infielders available. Hoerner has exceptional hand-eye coordination, an advanced approach and developing power.

Pirates: Cole Tucker, SS (PIT No. 5)
A broken thumb kept Tucker, an Arizona native, from attending Fall League a year ago, but now he's ready to go. The tall and athletic shortstop tied for the system lead in stolen bases with 35, his third year of 25 or more steals. Tucker was swinging a hot bat at the end of the season, including hitting a pair of playoff homers for Double-A Altoona.

Reds: Taylor Trammell, OF (CIN No. 3; MLB No. 17)
The Futures Game MVP has all the tools needed to be an elite-level player and finished third in the organization with 25 steals despite missing some time with a concussion in August. Trammell has an advanced approach at the plate (career .372 OBP) and is still learning to tap into his power. The 21-year-old could see time in all three outfield spots this fall.

NL West

D-backs: Jon Duplantier, RHP (ARI No. 1; MLB No. 80)
Durability concerns coming out of Rice forced Duplantier down to the third round of the 2016 Draft, but he answered those questions with a huge first full season across two levels and a trip to the Futures Game. While he pitched well in 2018, biceps tendinitis forced him out for nearly two months, so the right-hander is making up for lost innings in Fall League.

Dodgers: Keibert Ruiz, C (LAD No. 2; MLB No. 39)
One of the game's best catching prospects, Ruiz held his own offensively this year as the second-youngest regular (age 19 for most of the season) in the Double-A Texas League. He's a switch-hitter with advanced feel for the barrel and developing power, with most of his home runs coming as a left-hander. Ruiz is improving defensively and could become a solid receiver with arm strength to match.

Giants: Heath Quinn, OF (SF No. 10)
The second-highest pick (third round) in Samford history behind only Phil Ervin, Quinn has a similar offensive profile but has had difficulty staying healthy in pro ball. Hamate and shoulder injuries affected his first full pro season, while a hamstring strain sidelined him for a month in 2018. He drives the ball to all fields and has deceptive athleticism for a 6-foot-3, 220-pounder, showing solid speed once he gets going.

Padres: Buddy Reed, OF (SD No. 13)
The 2016 second-rounder struggled in his first pro season but rebounded in 2018 to hit .271 with 48 extra-base hits and 51 steals in 122 games between two levels including Double-A. The 6-foot-4, 210-pounder boasts some of the best tools in this year's Fall League, though questions remain about his hitting ability.

Rockies: Sam Hilliard, OF (COL No. 9)
First drafted by the Twins as a left-handed pitcher out of Crowder (Mo.) JC in 2014, Hilliard signed as an outfielder after a year at Wichita State in 2015. He's still somewhat raw at the plate, but Rockies officials once likened him to Larry Walker because he's a tooled-up right fielder who bats from the left side. Hilliard has plus raw power, speed and arm strength, giving him 20-20 potential and the ability to play anywhere in the outfield.