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Loved ones honored in SU2C moment at WS

@alysonfooter
October 23, 2020

Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner’s placard was filled with the names of kids who he connected with during his years of work with Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Pitcher Walker Buehler’s placard included the name of his late uncle, Matthew. Rays manager Kevin Cash wrote “JN + RW -- Kids @

Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner’s placard was filled with the names of kids who he connected with during his years of work with Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Pitcher Walker Buehler’s placard included the name of his late uncle, Matthew. Rays manager Kevin Cash wrote “JN + RW -- Kids @ All Childrens.”

Game Date Result Highlights
Gm 1 Oct. 20 LAD 8, TB 3 Watch
Gm 2 Oct. 21 TB 6, LAD 4 Watch
Gm 3 Oct. 23 LAD 6, TB 2 Watch
Gm 4 Oct. 24 TB 8, LAD 7 Watch
Gm 5 Oct. 25 LAD 4, TB 2 Watch
Gm 6 Oct. 27 LAD 3, TB 1 Watch

A longstanding World Series tradition commenced at the end of the fifth inning of Game 3 on Friday at Globe Life Field in Arlington, with players, coaches, managers, umpires and on-field reporters lining up and holding Stand Up To Cancer signs containing the names of friends or loved ones whom they are supporting during their fight against cancer.

Stand Up To Cancer

Rays outfielder Kevin Kiermaier’s sign said “Big Eddie.” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts’ said “Jim Bonds.” FOX and MLB Network personality Ken Rosenthal wrote “Gary Hughes” on one of his placards, a nod to the beloved longtime scout who passed away earlier this season.

Commissioner Rob Manfred, from a suite, held a placard with Bob Gibson’s name on it, in honor of the Hall of Famer who passed away on Oct. 2 from pancreatic cancer.

Placards were also distributed to fans in attendance, with encouragement to write the name of someone in their life they are supporting or have supported through a cancer ordeal. Fans at home were also invited to create a tribute placard at standuptocancer.org/istandupfor.

SU2C, MLB united in fight against cancer

A fan in the stands picked longtime Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek to include on his sign. Another said, simply, “Dad.”

The moment was dramatic -- on-field activity stopped completely as everyone came together for this one poignant, unifying exercise.

The sad reality is that everyone -- baseball players, managers, coaches, fans and more -- is connected by one sobering fact: Every person has been affected by cancer. Whether it’s going through it themselves or watching a friend or a loved one fight the toughest fight, no one is exempt from being connected, directly or indirectly, to the disease.

A happier reality is this: Major League Baseball’s partnership with Stand Up To Cancer, now in its 12th year, has raised more than $50 million for SU2C’s innovative cancer research programs. Mastercard has also supported the program for the past decade and has donated more than $50 million, with the help of its cardholders.

To acknowledge that milestone, Mastercard launched a donation match through the end of 2020 for fans to donate at StandUpToCancer.org using their Mastercard. When they do, the company will match what they give, dollar for dollar, up to $1 million.

The phrase “Stand Up To Cancer” is well known throughout baseball, but a closer look at the meaning of it provides a staggering look at just how far-reaching the program is.

More than 1,950 scientists, representing more than 210 institutions, are involved in SU2C-funded research projects, and more than 180 clinical trials have been funded by the organization. In May 2020, SU2C announced its eighth FDA approval for a new cancer therapy that was supported by SU2C research.

Alyson Footer is a national correspondent for MLB.com. Follow her on Twitter @alysonfooter.