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Reds HOF reveals Marty's five greatest calls

@m_sheldon
September 26, 2019

CINCINNATI -- During most of the past 46 seasons of broadcasting Reds games, play-by-play radio voice Marty Brennaman has been behind the microphone calling many of the franchises’ biggest moments. Brennaman was there when the Reds won World Series in 1975, '76 and '90. He called Tom Seaver’s lone career

CINCINNATI -- During most of the past 46 seasons of broadcasting Reds games, play-by-play radio voice Marty Brennaman has been behind the microphone calling many of the franchises’ biggest moments.

Brennaman was there when the Reds won World Series in 1975, '76 and '90. He called Tom Seaver’s lone career no-hitter, and in the first half-inning of his big league broadcasting career on Opening Day in '74, Brennaman flawlessly captured the moment when Hank Aaron tied Babe Ruth’s all-time record with career home run No. 714.

For both the good times and the not so good, Brennaman’s candid assessments of what he saw on the field were described like no other in the business.

Of course, no one will soon forget Brennaman’s signature line following a win, “And this one belongs to the Reds.”

The National Baseball Hall of Fame 2000 Ford Frick Award winner's most famous call wasn’t even at a baseball game. He did the national radio broadcast during the 1992 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament when Christian Laettner’s buzzer-beater basket gave Duke a thrilling victory over Kentucky to get into the Final Four.

While there are moments that fans may have as their favorites, the Reds Hall of Fame compiled what it believes are the top five best calls of Brennaman’s career.

5. Adam Dunn’s walk-off grand slam vs Indians, June 30, 2006

During an improbable 9-8 victory over the Indians, the Reds scored all nine of their runs in the eighth and ninth innings after trailing 7-0. In the bottom of the ninth, Dunn hooked a liner inside the right-field foul pole for a walk-off grand slam, capping a five-run rally for the win.

4. Reds win the National League pennant, Oct. 12, 1990

Following a wire-to-wire NL West title, “Nasty Boys” reliever Randy Myers recorded a strikeout that ended Game 6 of the NL Championship Series with a win over the Pirates as Cincinnati advanced to play the A’s in its first World Series since 1976. Cincinnati would sweep Oakland in the Fall Classic for the championship.

3. Tom Browning’s perfect game, Sept. 16, 1988

With a strikeout of Tracy Woodson in the ninth inning, Browning became the only Reds pitcher to record a perfect game. It was the 12th in Major League history, and the first thrown by a lefty since Sandy Koufax in 1965.

“Twenty-seven outs in a row and he is being mobbed by his teammates just to the third-base side of the mound!” Brennaman exclaimed.

2. Jay Bruce's walk-off to clinch the NL Central, Sept. 28, 2010

“He hit it a ton and it’s gone! And the 2010 Central Division championship belongs to the Cincinnati Reds!” Brennaman said, excitedly.

Bruce’s home run to center field in the bottom of the ninth inning against the Astros clinched the NL Central and gave Cincinnati its first postseason berth since 1995.

1. Career hit No. 4,192 by Pete Rose, Sept. 11, 1985

“Hit No. 4,192, a line-drive single into left-center field ... It is pandemonium here at Riverfront Stadium,” Brennaman said.

It was a moment that had been anticipated since the Reds re-acquired Rose to be their player-manager a season prior. Facing Padres pitcher Eric Show, Rose overtook Hall of Famer Ty Cobb to become baseball’s all-time hits leader.

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook.