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Senzel to learn OF during instructional league

Bailey likely done pitching this season; Mahle won't start Saturday
MLB.com

MILWAUKEE -- Last weekend against the Cubs, the Reds saw former National League Most Valuable Player Award-winner Kris Bryant start in both left and right field. He's also played a few games this season at first base, although his main position is third base.

Cincinnati's front office envisions similar versatility for its No. 1 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline: Nick Senzel. The former third baseman, who played second base for Triple-A Louisville this season and shortstop in big league Spring Training, is in Arizona this week to learn the outfield during instructional league. Senzel, 23, will play games in left field when the schedule opens on Oct. 1.

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MILWAUKEE -- Last weekend against the Cubs, the Reds saw former National League Most Valuable Player Award-winner Kris Bryant start in both left and right field. He's also played a few games this season at first base, although his main position is third base.

Cincinnati's front office envisions similar versatility for its No. 1 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline: Nick Senzel. The former third baseman, who played second base for Triple-A Louisville this season and shortstop in big league Spring Training, is in Arizona this week to learn the outfield during instructional league. Senzel, 23, will play games in left field when the schedule opens on Oct. 1.

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• Reds' Top 30 prospects

"When you have a guy who can hit and is a really good athlete and play the infield, it's not a huge hurdle to think he can go to the outfield," Reds president of baseball operations Dick Williams said on Tuesday. "Whether or not it becomes a primary position for Nick would be [determined] further down the road."

Senzel, who is ranked as the No. 4 prospect in all of baseball by MLB Pipeline, was the No. 2 overall selection in the 2016 Draft. There were hopes he'd reach the big leagues in 2018, but his season was cut short by season-ending surgery on his right index finger. Senzel also missed nearly a month in May due to a bout with vertigo.

"We definitely wanted him to get some playing time on the heels of this abbreviated season because of the injuries," Williams said. "We had talked to him about extending his season and getting back out there and getting at-bats. In the course of discussing that, we asked him to come prepared to show what he can do in the outfield. We're going to have some instructors out there specifically working with him on that. This guy has shown us enough to know that we have what we believe will be an elite hitter at second base and third base and a guy who has shown he can play shortstop. At this point, we want to see what else he can do.

"He's a guy that has risen to the challenges put in front of him in the past. He is eager to tackle this one, as well. It's important to develop players that have positional flexibility. Nick is the kind of athlete we think is very well suited to at least familiarize himself with the different positions to see what the opportunities will be at the big league level."

Watch: MiLB Video

Senzel will first get acquainted with left field because the club feels that is the most difficult of the three outfield spots.

"If he gets good reads there, it's a good indicator that he would be able to play right field," Williams said. "We'd then see if the athleticism carries him to center field."

The Reds' outfield situation could be in flux before 2019. Corner outfielder Jesse Winker is coming off right shoulder surgery, while center fielder Billy Hamilton will be a year away from free agency and a potential trade candidate. Right fielder Scott Schebler twice missed time on the disabled list this season, and Phillip Ervin has been establishing himself in left field lately.

"Anything that gives us the ability to field a competitive team and have more options is something we want to pursue," Williams said.

Bailey likely done in 2018
The Reds have an open spot in the rotation again for Sunday vs. the Marlins, and interim manager Jim Riggleman said the turn would either go to Tuesday's starter, Michael Lorenzen, or someone currently in the bullpen.

One healthy starting pitcher who won't get the assignment is Homer Bailey, whom it appears is done pitching this season.

"As far as starting, yeah," Riggleman said. "Homer has indicated that he can't relieve. Hard to think of something else to use him with."

When Bailey was dropped from the rotation in favor of Tyler Mahle earlier in September, Riggleman noted at the time that the veteran would be the next man up if there was a starting need.

"When we took Homer out of the rotation," Riggleman said. "That was the plan. Since that time, we've just decided to go otherwise. We changed our direction."

Bailey is making $21 million this season and has one year and $28 million left on his six-year contract with a mutual option for 2020.

Mahle, who has been working his way through right shoulder fatigue, is also not a candidate to start at Miami.

"Mahle definitely won't pitch Sunday because we haven't done enough with him to get him ready for Sunday," Riggleman said.

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds

Inbox: Senzel to get look in outfield in 2019?

Beat reporter Mark Sheldon answers questions from Reds fans
MLB.com

What position will Nick Senzel play next year?
-- Ronald H. (via Facebook)

If the Reds are not able to reach a deal with Scooter Gennett and decide to trade him this offseason, I could see second base as the first option for Senzel, who is working his way back from season-ending right index finger surgery. But I think Cincinnati's top prospect is athletic enough to give the outfield a try -- either left field or center field. I was a little surprised Senzel didn't get any chances there during Spring Training while he was getting a look at shortstop.

What position will Nick Senzel play next year?
-- Ronald H. (via Facebook)

If the Reds are not able to reach a deal with Scooter Gennett and decide to trade him this offseason, I could see second base as the first option for Senzel, who is working his way back from season-ending right index finger surgery. But I think Cincinnati's top prospect is athletic enough to give the outfield a try -- either left field or center field. I was a little surprised Senzel didn't get any chances there during Spring Training while he was getting a look at shortstop.

:: Submit a question to the Reds Inbox ::

Why have the Reds not ridded themselves of Billy Hamilton, Raisel Iglesias and Gennett? I really like them, but they will make a lot more money this coming year. Not only could you get something, but you would save about $20 million in salary by moving them. Then you could really add some starting pitching. Senzel and Dilson Herrera could easily fill in these spots. Plus, you have others like Shed Long on the way.
-- Terry V. (via Facebook)

Part of the reasoning behind not moving those guys, and Matt Harvey, is the Reds' front office seems intent on finishing 2018 with as many wins as possible to try to carry momentum into '19. If the club was years from contending again and another teardown/rebuild was needed, I would agree that those guys should all go. But Iglesias isn't making too much money for the value he provides and Gennett has already been targeted for an extension.

Hamilton is the tricky one, because like Gennett, he will be third-year arbitration-eligible and a year from free agency. It's harder to place a market value on Hamilton since his on-base ability has been subpar while his defense is continually off the charts. Cincinnati not letting Harvey go -- both at the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline and after he was claimed on waivers last week -- was a surprise, especially if he isn't going to be re-signed as a free agent.

Any chance that Jose Peraza gets a look in center field for next year?
-- Luke D. (via Facebook)

I don't think so. Peraza, still only 24, has shown a lot of improvement at the plate and some in the field while getting to play every day at shortstop all season. I think stability is what he needs, and there really are no big league-ready shortstops in the system to take his place.

How is Jonathan India doing? Will we finally see a Reds prospect in the Majors sooner than later?
-- @JoeletPirman

On the plus side, India has already moved up two levels since opening his pro career with Rookie-level Greeneville after he was the fifth overall pick in the 2018 Draft. But not surprisingly, the numbers haven't been exceptional -- .224/.378/.400 with four home runs and 20 RBIs in a combined 38 games entering Monday with Greeneville, Rookie-level Billings and Class A Dayton, where he currently plays. It's been a long year for India, who essentially played for the University of Florida year-round and into the College World Series before missing some time during the signing process and then adjusting to life in pro ball. After a real offseason, I would expect 2019 to be a stronger year.

As for seeing a prospect in the Majors from the Reds, there have been a lot already over the past couple of years -- from Tyler Mahle to Luis Castillo to Jesse Winker.

What do you think would realistically have to happen for the Reds to make the playoffs next year?
-- James T.

A legitimate No. 1 or No. 2 starting pitcher for Cincinnati's starting rotation is sorely needed to bring a level of consistency and dependability. The current rotation ranks at or near the bottom of the National League in ERA, innings and WHIP, and it's at the top in home runs allowed. But what might be overlooked as a need is more offense. Obviously, injuries have really hampered the lineup in the second half, but having more run creators and producers to surround Joey Votto and Eugenio Suarez can't hurt. The Reds also rank 11th in home runs in the NL, which you wouldn't expect for a team that calls Great American Ball Park its home.

Why do batters always adjust their batting gloves after every pitch -- even if they don't even swing?
-- Susanne G. (via Facebook)

It can be maddening, right? In the 1970s and '80s, former first baseman Mike Hargrove was known as "The Human Rain Delay" for such things. But even contemporary players like former Red Jay Bruce often made a series of adjustments between pitches -- swing or no swing. Votto is one of the few guys I notice who stands in the box consistently after taking a pitch.

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds

Reds prospect Hunter Greene has UCL sprain

Mahle optioned to Triple-A; Reyes called up
MLB.com

WASHINGTON -- Hunter Greene, the No. 2 selection in the 2017 MLB Draft, won't pitch the rest of the season with Class A Advanced Dayton due to an ulnar collateral ligament sprain in his right elbow. Reds general manager Nick Krall said Greene will strengthen his elbow at the Reds' Spring Training facility in Goodyear, Ariz., and try to avoid Tommy John surgery.

Greene, MLB Pipeline's No. 2-ranked Reds prospect, felt discomfort while throwing a bullpen session earlier this week before a team doctor diagnosed his injury. Krall hopes the right-hander will be healthy for next season.

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WASHINGTON -- Hunter Greene, the No. 2 selection in the 2017 MLB Draft, won't pitch the rest of the season with Class A Advanced Dayton due to an ulnar collateral ligament sprain in his right elbow. Reds general manager Nick Krall said Greene will strengthen his elbow at the Reds' Spring Training facility in Goodyear, Ariz., and try to avoid Tommy John surgery.

Greene, MLB Pipeline's No. 2-ranked Reds prospect, felt discomfort while throwing a bullpen session earlier this week before a team doctor diagnosed his injury. Krall hopes the right-hander will be healthy for next season.

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"The positive, if there is any such thing, is that if it happens now when he's 18, he'll still only be 19 and ready to go," Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman said. "You almost figure it's going to happen. It happens to so many of them that I'm not in the least bit surprised."

Video: Top Prospects: Hunter Greene, RHP, Reds

Michael Lorenzen and Anthony DeSclafani dealt with similar injuries as Greene in 2016 and '17, respectively, and recovered without surgery.

Nick Senzel, who's rated the top Reds prospect by MLB Pipeline, is also out for the rest of this season with a torn tendon in his right index finger.

Greene was 3-7 with a 4.48 ERA, 89 strikeouts and 23 walks in 18 starts with Dayton this season. The Stevenson Ranch, Calif., native threw 19 pitches over 100 mph in 1 1/3 innings during the All-Star Futures Game on July 15.

Mahle optioned after start
After another poor performance Thursday against the Nationals, Tyler Mahle was optioned to Louisville, cutting the Reds' rotation to five pitchers. Cincinnati recalled Jesus Reyes from Louisville to add an eighth bullpen arm.

Mahle allowed six runs over 1 2/3 innings Thursday, marking the third time in his past four starts the right-hander didn't pitch past the third inning. Mahle has allowed 20 earned runs in 10 2/3 innings over his past four starts. In six June starts, Mahle was 3-0 with a 2.18 ERA.

Riggleman said Mahle is working with his mechanics, and the 23-year-old will have more leeway to do so in Louisville. Riggleman believes Mahle's Minor League stint will be short.

The Reds had been using a six-man rotation since July 22.

"He's an outstanding young pitcher who hit a rut like many do," Riggleman said. "Even position players, guys will come up and they just struggle. They go back, and when they come back to the big leagues, they're fine. I think that's what we're going to find with Tyler."

Reyes hasn't pitched in the Major Leagues but will add bullpen depth after Keury Mella threw 4 1/3 innings Thursday, the longest outing for a Reds reliever this season. Reyes has recorded a 3.86 ERA with 57 strikeouts and 27 walks in 31 games between Louisville and Double-A Pensacola this season. Reyes spent a day with the Reds in May but didn't enter the game.

"I feel proud, and I feel happy the Reds gave me another opportunity to be here," Reyes said through a translator.

Schebler back with club but not activated
Scott Schebler's 20-day rehab limit ended Friday as he returned from his rehab assignment with Louisville. The 27-year-old will work on his throwing program in Cincinnati and possibly rehab again before returning to the Major Leagues.

Schebler landed on the disabled list July 18 with a sprained AC joint in his right shoulder.

Video: CIN@STL: Schebler gets injured on a catch at the wall

Kyle Melnick is a reporter for MLB.com based in Washington.

Cincinnati Reds, Tyler Mahle, Jesus Reyes, Scott Schebler

Senzel, Greene rep Reds on new prospect lists

MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- The annual midseason recalibration of Major League Baseball's top 100 prospects has been completed by MLB Pipeline, and the Reds are well represented among the elite young talent in the game.

Only the Reds can claim three players among the top 20 -- Nick Senzel, Hunter Greene and Taylor Trammell -- and they have four players in the top 100.

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CINCINNATI -- The annual midseason recalibration of Major League Baseball's top 100 prospects has been completed by MLB Pipeline, and the Reds are well represented among the elite young talent in the game.

Only the Reds can claim three players among the top 20 -- Nick Senzel, Hunter Greene and Taylor Trammell -- and they have four players in the top 100.

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Senzel, an infielder with Triple-A Louisville, remains the No. 1 prospect in the organization and No. 4 overall despite the fact that he will miss the rest of the season with a right index finger injury that required surgery.

Video: Senzel discusses his season-ending thumb injury

Greene, the right-handed pitcher who just threw a 102-mph fastball on Thursday for Class A Dayton, remains at No. 2 in the organization and No. 18 overall. Greene's teammate in the Sirius-XM All-Star Futures Game, and that contest's MVP, was Trammell, who is the No. 3 prospect for the Reds and No. 19 overall.

Entering the Reds' list of top 30 prospects this week are four players taken in the 2018 MLB Draft. Third baseman Jonathan India is ranked at No. 4 and outfielder Mike Siani at No. 10. India was the fifth overall pick in the 2018 MLB Draft, and was just promoted from Rookie-level Greeneville to Billings this week. Siani was a fourth-round selection. Pitcher Lyon Richardson, taken in the second round, is ranked 20th and Competitive Balance Round B pick, pitcher Josiah Gray is No. 21.

Video: Top Prospects: Jonathan India, 3B, Reds

Peralta, Mella called up

In need of bullpen help after their relievers pitched eight innings following starter Tyler Mahle in Thursday's loss to the Phillies, the Reds recalled lefty Wandy Peralta and right-hander Keury Mella from Triple-A Louisville on Friday.

To make room on the roster, reliever Austin Brice was optioned to Louisville. Lefty reliever Kyle Crockett was designated for assignment.

"The changes we made aren't really as much based on anybody's pitching performances, as much as how much they've had to pitch," Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman said. "A couple of guys threw a lot of pitches, so we need to get some guys here who can give us some innings if we get into a similar situation, either tonight or tomorrow night."

Peralta posted a 6.14 ERA in 37 appearances for the Reds this season before he was optioned to Louisville on June 21. In 13 relief appearances at Triple-A, he had a 3.14 ERA with 13 hits, seven walks and 10 strikeouts in 14 1/3 innings. However, his last four appearances, totaling five innings, were perfect.

"Initially when he went down, he didn't seem to be making progress there for a little while," Riggleman said. "In his last couple of weeks, they have been very promising. We're hoping that's what he brings here."

Mella was Louisville's scheduled starter on Friday, but will be available for long relief for Cincinnati. He was a September callup last season and made two relief appearances with a 6.75 ERA over four innings.

The organization's No. 12 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline, Mella was 9-4 with a 3.09 ERA in 19 starts for Louisville and Double-A Pensacola this season. He was promoted to Louisville earlier this month.

"He's another young guy who has got a big arm. He's been down there refining his pitches, made a lot of progress this year," Riggleman said. "Just a quality young starter that may have to make his way here initially in the bullpen. Hopefully, he can come here and show he's here to stay."

Votto accepts Lou Gehrig Award

During pregame ceremonies, Joey Votto accepted the 2017 Lou Gehrig Memorial Award, sponsored by the Phi Delta Theta international fraternity. Headquartered in Oxford, Ohio, at Miami University, Phi Delta Theta presents the award annually to a Major League Baseball player who best exemplifies the giving character of Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig, who was a member of the fraternity at Columbia University.

"He's someone who playing the same position, just from a professional standpoint, I have a deep admiration for him," said Votto, who was named the award winner in April. "I've read about him and looked at his career. I did my very best to do some research on him as a player and as a person.

"For him to have the grace to handle it, such an intimidating disease [ALS], I couldn't imagine what it would be like to lose your life by something that people had almost never heard of [at the time]. It in all likelihood it would be completely terrifying. That, to me, is another amazing, amazing thing that he withstood."

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds

Reds recall Peralta, Mella to boost bullpen

Brice optioned to Triple-A; Crockett designated for assignment
MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- In need of bullpen help after their relievers pitched eight innings in Thursday's loss to the Phillies, the Reds recalled lefty Wandy Peralta and right-hander Keury Mella from Triple-A Louisville on Friday.

To make room on the roster, reliever Austin Brice was optioned to Louisville. Lefty reliever Kyle Crockett was designated for assignment.

View Full Game Coverage

CINCINNATI -- In need of bullpen help after their relievers pitched eight innings in Thursday's loss to the Phillies, the Reds recalled lefty Wandy Peralta and right-hander Keury Mella from Triple-A Louisville on Friday.

To make room on the roster, reliever Austin Brice was optioned to Louisville. Lefty reliever Kyle Crockett was designated for assignment.

View Full Game Coverage

Video: STL@CIN: Mella collects his first career strikeout

Peralta posted a 6.14 ERA in 37 appearances for the Reds this season before he was optioned to Louisville on June 21. Mella, a starter, was a September callup last season, and he made two relief appearances in 2017. The organization's No. 12 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline, he was 9-4 with a 3.09 ERA in 19 starts for Louisville and Double-A Pensacola this season.

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds, Austin Brice, Kyle Crockett, Keury Mella, Wandy Peralta

Trammell wins Futures MVP; Greene brings heat

Duo offers high-octane peek at impressive talent in Reds' pipeline
MLB.com

WASHINGTON -- Reds Minor League outfielder Taylor Trammell had just accepted the Future Games MVP trophy Sunday evening and had said all the right things about being thankful for the opportunity, thrilled to be part of the event and happy he'd been at his best on a large stage.

But he kept circling the conversation back to a guy sitting on the other side of the clubhouse, to another youngster Cincinnati is building a bright and shiny future around.

WASHINGTON -- Reds Minor League outfielder Taylor Trammell had just accepted the Future Games MVP trophy Sunday evening and had said all the right things about being thankful for the opportunity, thrilled to be part of the event and happy he'd been at his best on a large stage.

But he kept circling the conversation back to a guy sitting on the other side of the clubhouse, to another youngster Cincinnati is building a bright and shiny future around.

Box score

"Hunter Greene is 18 years old and throwing 102 mph," Trammell kept saying. "Did he hit 103? He didn't throw a fastball under 100, right? The potential for him is just limitless."

Video: WLD@USA: Greene K's Matias swinging in the 3rd inning

This was a day for the Reds to celebrate what they are building. Trammell, 20, homered and tripled, and Greene, 18, blew up the radar gun at Nationals Park as their Team USA beat the World, 10-6 -- an eight-homer slugfest in the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game.

:: 2018 Futures Game coverage ::

On a day when baseball's best players put on a showcase of blazing fastballs and eye-popping power, no organization had more to be happy about than the Reds. They've been one of baseball's surprise first-half stories, going 40-38 under interim manager Jim Riggleman.

Through it all, the Reds have made it clear that the best is yet to come, thanks to a Minor League system being replenished and quickly. So here were two of their best young players proving the point. Trammell is at Class A Advanced Daytona, Greene at Class A Dayton. Trammell homered in the bottom of the sixth inning -- a tiebreaking solo shot that was projected to travel 438 feet by Statcast™ -- and then banged a triple off the center-field wall in the eighth.

Now about that triple. Trammell rounded first base and signaled "two" with his fingers, thinking he'd homered for a second time.

"I hit the ball and thought I got it," he said. "I looked over to the dugout, and they were going crazy. I was like, `I got it.' I was just having a little bit of fun with those guys. I didn't see it hit the wall, but when I saw the center fielder running, I was like, `Oh, this can't be happening.' I'm not going to hear the end of it."

Hey, slow down. How about some perspective? He'd just had a day he's likely to remember for the rest of his life. That's what he set out to do, right? That's why they play games like this.

"I talked to Cespedes Family BBQ about it [before the game]," he said. "It's an All-Star Game. I'm going to have as much fun as possible without trying to go overboard or anything like that. I'm just having a blast.

Video: Taylor Trammell discusses meeting Hank Aaron

"I'm very happy my family got to see me perform today. I'm glad I got to showcase what I had to the world. I'm very thankful for the Futures Game and the Reds organization for selecting me. I'm glad I got to bring some hardware to Cincinnati."

One of his teammates at Daytona, first baseman Bruce Yari, had told him to bring a souvenir back from the Futures Game. As Trammell put it, "You know when you were in preschool someone would go on a trip to Europe or someplace like that, and they'd bring back some taffy or something to the whole class."

He pointed toward the MVP trophy and said, "I think that right there is good enough to give them back. Bruce, that's for you."

Tweet from @Reds: .@Taytram24 is the first #Reds prospect to win the Larry Doby Award as MVP of the #FuturesGame! 🏆 pic.twitter.com/GVyHJhpgUC

Back to Greene. He pitched 1 1/3 innings and allowed two hits and a run -- a home run by White Sox prospect Luis Alexander Basabe.

When asked what pitch Basabe hit, Greene said: "102 mph, inside [part of the plate]. He turned on it. I tip my cap to that guy."

Video: WLD@USA: Basabe homers off 102-mph pitch from Greene

To be precise: 102.3 mph was the pitch Basabe hit. According to Statcast™, no pitch that fast has been hit for a home run in the Majors since Rafael Devers took Aroldis Chapman deep last season on a 102.8-mph heater.

"It's amazing to get the opportunity to play at this stage," Greene said, "and to be with the best guys in the Minor Leagues is really cool. To see everybody do their thing and to play the game we love. It's a great way to go compete and then go back to our season and to learn what the guys at the higher level are playing like and what they know."

Video: WLD@USA: Greene talks playing in Futures Game

He'd been assigned Bryce Harper's locker in the Nationals clubhouse and said that just added to the experience. That and competing against the best prospects.

"It's special," he said. "I'm taking it all in as much as I can. I'm going to be able to say I pitched against these guys when they get called up."

That goes both ways. Plenty of these guys will say they got to play with and against Greene and Trammell in the Futures Game. That's likely to mean something, too.

Richard Justice has been a reporter for MLB.com since 2011. Read his columns, listen to his podcast and follow him on Twitter at @RichardJustice.

Cincinnati Reds, Hunter Greene, Taylor Trammell

Reds get pitchers Marinan, Zabala from Dodgers

Reliever Floro, Minor Leaguer Neal head to LA
MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Veteran right-handed reliever Dylan Floro proved to be a nice find for the Reds in the offseason. Floro was signed as a Minor League free agent in December, and his stock increased enough that he could be flipped for a coveted prospect.

On Wednesday, the Reds traded Floro, Minor League right-hander Zach Neal and international signing bonus pool space to the Dodgers for Minor League right-handed pitchers James Marinan and Aneurys Zabala. Marinan was ranked No. 21 among the Dodgers Top 30 prospects, according to MLB Pipeline.

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CINCINNATI -- Veteran right-handed reliever Dylan Floro proved to be a nice find for the Reds in the offseason. Floro was signed as a Minor League free agent in December, and his stock increased enough that he could be flipped for a coveted prospect.

On Wednesday, the Reds traded Floro, Minor League right-hander Zach Neal and international signing bonus pool space to the Dodgers for Minor League right-handed pitchers James Marinan and Aneurys Zabala. Marinan was ranked No. 21 among the Dodgers Top 30 prospects, according to MLB Pipeline.

View Full Game Coverage

Called up from Triple-A in mid-April, the 27-year-old Floro posted a 2.72 ERA in 25 games and 36 1/3 innings for the Reds this season. That included his 1 2/3 scoreless innings during Tuesday's 12-8 loss in 12 innings.

"We took the opportunity to trade from an area of relative depth to acquire promising future assets. Marinan is someone that was very high on our Draft board in 2017," Reds president of baseball operations Dick Williams said. "We are pleased to see the team performing on the field but recognize we have to keep pushing forward opportunistically to acquire talent."

Video: CWS@CIN: Floro retires Tilson, strands 2 in the 8th

In three starts this season for the Dodgers' rookie-level Arizona League club, the 19-year-old Marinan has a 0.84 ERA, and he has a 1.30 ERA in the past two seasons.

Zabala, 21, is 2-2 with a 4.86 ERA in 24 relief appearances for Class A Great Lakes.

Marinan will report to Rookie-level Billings and Zabala is headed to Class A Dayton.

Reed, Rainey recalled for bullpen
With Floro traded and a 12-inning game on Tuesday, reinforcements were needed on Wednesday, so Cincinnati recalled left-handed pitcher Cody Reed and right-hander Tanner Rainey from Triple-A Louisville. To clear a roster spot, utility player Brandon Dixon was optioned to Louisville.

The moves left the Reds with a three-man bench, plus a fourth in reliever and capable hitter Michael Lorenzen.

"We needed a little coverage," Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman said. "We used a lot of guys last night. For some of the guys, it's been three days in a row or two days in a row with a fairly good number of pitches. So, we needed the extra pitcher more than a bench player for a day."

Video: CIN@PHI: Reed K's Lively to strike out the side

It's possible the club could recall someone for the bench on Friday, ahead of a three-game series vs. the Cubs at Wrigley Field.

In 12 games for Louisville, Reed is 2-6 with a 4.57 ERA. He opened the season in the big leagues with Cincinnati and had a 5.40 ERA in four games that included one start.

Reed has pitched well lately, with each of his last four starts being at least seven innings. What's been the difference after some struggles earlier this season and last season?

"Just not be so uptight like I was last year," Reed replied. "I'm just letting it loose and doing my thing and staying in the strike zone more and throwing all my pitches for strikes. I actually looked up most of the hits I've given up this year, and they've mostly been in the first two pitches. So I know I'm in the zone and I'm attacking guys, going after them right away. Hits are going to come, but hits also lead to outs."

Wednesday was Reed's turn to start for Louisville. In his previous start vs. Toledo on Friday, he gave up eight earned runs and 10 hits over seven innings. However, seven of those runs came in the first inning before he turned things around.

"That ballgame the other day was the talk of our organization," Riggleman said.

"We didn't make a couple of plays, but that's just the way it is," Reed said. "That was big to somewhat keep my team in the game after giving up seven in the first. That's hard to chip away. I felt the best about that outing than all the other ones. I think I had a game where I struck out 10 or 11 and that one was OK. Going seven innings after giving up seven runs in the first is more impressive internally for me."

Rainey has a 1.25 ERA in 25 appearances for Louisville. This is his fourth big league callup this season.

Iglesias giving up homers
Reds closer Raisel Iglesias wasn't available Wednesday after he pitched the previous three days. Iglesias blew his third save in 19 tries during Tuesday's loss, giving up the game-tying homer to Avisail Garcia in the top of the ninth inning. It was the sixth homer Iglesias has given up in 35 games this season after he allowed five in 63 games during 2017.

"I don't have an explanation for it," Riggleman said. "He was throwing real hard last night. The first hitter he faced, he threw 97 [mph]. I was like, 'Wow. He's firing.' A hot hitter got him. That guy is swinging the bat good. I'm sure he didn't quite hit his spot and he got him. I don't think it had to do with three days in a row."

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds, James Marinan, Cody Reed, Aneurys Zabala

Senzel undergoes surgery on finger fracture

MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Reds prospect Nick Senzel underwent surgery to reduce a fracture in his right index finger on Thursday. There was no damage to the tendon in that finger.

The surgery was performed in New York by Dr. Thomas Graham, according to a release from the Reds.

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CINCINNATI -- Reds prospect Nick Senzel underwent surgery to reduce a fracture in his right index finger on Thursday. There was no damage to the tendon in that finger.

The surgery was performed in New York by Dr. Thomas Graham, according to a release from the Reds.

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Senzel, Cincinnati's top prospect and No. 5 in all of baseball according to MLB Pipeline, sustained the injury in a game with Triple-A Louisville last Friday. He fielded a ground ball in the first inning that took a high hop toward him, which he thought had jammed his finger. A couple of plays later, he was relaying a throw as the cutoff man and felt his finger pop as he released the baseball. Senzel quickly exited the game as the pain intensified and the finger began to swell.

Tweet from @LilSenzii: Surgery was a success #RoadToRecovery

Senzel thrived this season in Louisville, slashing .310/.378/.509 in 44 games with 12 doubles, six home runs and 25 RBIs. He missed nearly a month earlier in the season while dealing with symptoms of vertigo.

While there was no set plan for when Senzel would be promoted to the Majors, Reds manager Jim Riggleman acknowledged he thought there was a good chance would join the big league club by the end of the regular season. Senzel echoed those sentiments during a teleconference on Sunday.

There is no timetable for Senzel's return, but he will rehab the injury in Cincinnati.

Brian Rippee is a reporter for MLB.com based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds

Senzel eager to get to work on return from injury

MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Nick Senzel experienced his first Reds game at Great American Ball Park on Saturday and will be spending the next couple of months in Cincinnati. But these occurrences did not happen for the reasons he was hoping for.

The Reds' top prospect will undergo surgery on Tuesday to repair a torn tendon in his right index finger, after suffering the injury in a game with Triple-A Louisville on Friday night. Senzel fielded a hard ground ball that hopped up toward his chest. He thought he'd suffered a fairly normal jammed finger. A couple of plays later, when he was making a relay throw to home plate, he heard a pop and his finger immediately began to swell up. After the pain intensified, he exited the game. Senzel thinks the ground ball was the leading cause.

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CINCINNATI -- Nick Senzel experienced his first Reds game at Great American Ball Park on Saturday and will be spending the next couple of months in Cincinnati. But these occurrences did not happen for the reasons he was hoping for.

The Reds' top prospect will undergo surgery on Tuesday to repair a torn tendon in his right index finger, after suffering the injury in a game with Triple-A Louisville on Friday night. Senzel fielded a hard ground ball that hopped up toward his chest. He thought he'd suffered a fairly normal jammed finger. A couple of plays later, when he was making a relay throw to home plate, he heard a pop and his finger immediately began to swell up. After the pain intensified, he exited the game. Senzel thinks the ground ball was the leading cause.

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"A couple batters later, the distance of the throw and the pressure I had to put on the baseball, the tendon -- right when I threw it -- just ripped a chunk of my bone off," Senzel said. "I heard it and knew it right away. The ground ball definitely played a major role in it. I am not just going to throw a ball and hear it pop. That is not how it works."

Senzel is having the surgery done in Cincinnati and will rehab the injury there, as well. It has been a frustrating season for the Reds' 2016 first-round Draft pick. He missed nearly a month while dealing with symptoms of vertigo and was playing well after he got back on the field.

Tweet from @LilSenzii: So hard to be frustrated with the raining support that has come my way #thankyouagain #seeyousoon

"I was going in knowing that something was wrong," Senzel said. "I was going in there knowing that I definitely was going to miss some time, because it was still swollen and it currently still hurts now. I was going in mentally prepared that I was definitely going to miss some time. I was kind of shocked that I was going to miss the rest of the season."

Senzel hit .310 with 12 doubles, two triples, six homers, 25 RBIs and recorded eight stolen bases in 44 games for Louisville. He sensed he was close to realizing his dream of being called up to the big leagues.

"I felt like [my injury] could not have come at a worse time, to be honest with you," Senzel said. "I felt like I was close [to the Majors]. I felt like I was right there. I felt like I was ready. ... I know a lot of people felt that way. Just working my way up -- and knowing and having conversations with my agent and agency -- I was right there."

Senzel took in Saturday's win from Reds owner Bob Castellini's box, which was hardly the first-time experience he'd envisioned at Great American Ball Park. Senzel said the support he's gotten from the organization has been uplifting and that he has accepted his fate and is now focused on returning stronger.

"I think, at this point, it's kind of accepting that I won't be playing in another game," Senzel said. "You just move on, and I get surgery Tuesday and get to work on getting this thing better. I start my rehab on Wednesday. Time to get to work to where I need to be."

Brian Scott Rippee is a reporter for MLB.com based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds, Nick Senzel

MLB's No. 6 overall prospect Senzel out for year

Infielder to undergo surgery for torn tendon in right index finger
MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Reds top prospect Nick Senzel will undergo surgery on Tuesday to repair a torn tendon in his right index finger and will miss the remainder of the season. Senzel suffered the injury in a game with Triple-A Louisville on Friday night.

Senzel was pulled in the first inning after fielding a ball and making a throw. Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman seemed to think Senzel suffered the injury during the throw.

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CINCINNATI -- Reds top prospect Nick Senzel will undergo surgery on Tuesday to repair a torn tendon in his right index finger and will miss the remainder of the season. Senzel suffered the injury in a game with Triple-A Louisville on Friday night.

Senzel was pulled in the first inning after fielding a ball and making a throw. Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman seemed to think Senzel suffered the injury during the throw.

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"I don't think it was a bad hop," Riggleman said. "I think he did it throwing."

Senzel hit .310 with 12 doubles, two triples, six home runs, 25 RBIs and eight stolen bases in 44 games for Louisville this season. He missed nearly a month earlier this season while dealing with vertigo. Senzel, 22, is rated as baseball's No. 6 overall prospect, per MLB Pipeline.

"It had been a challenging season from the start, but it helped me grow," Senzel said in a statement on social media. "I had a goal this season, and it was to make it to the big leagues and help the Cincinnati Reds win ballgames. Although I did not fulfull this goal, it will not stop my drive to continue to fulfill my dream."

While there were no plans in the immediate future to bring Senzel to the Major Leagues, it was thought to be a strong possibility he'd be up with the Reds toward the end of the season.

"It was never anything specific, and I never talked to [Reds general manager] Nick [Krall] about when do we think he will be here or anything like that," Riggleman said. "Just hearing about his progress, you got a sense that he might be here before September and certainly in all liklihood in September, at least. I am not sure where that stands now."

Schebler set to be be reinstated
Scott Schebler was back at Great American Ball Park on Saturday, and Riggleman said the team will make room to activate the outfielder on Sunday. Schebler was placed on the bereavement list on Thursday and is eligble to be reinstated after three days.

Schebler is batting .281 with nine home runs and 28 RBIs in 57 games this season and is part of a four-man outfield Riggleman has been navigating with Billy Hamilton, Adam Duvall and Jesse Winker. Phillip Ervin was called up from Louisville on Thursday in Schebler's abscence.

Crockett gets job done in Reds debut
Kyle Crockett made his Reds debut in an important spot in Friday's 6-3 win over the Cubs. The left-hander was brought in to face Chicago slugger Kyle Schwarber with two men on base and two outs in the sixth inning as Cincinnati clung to a 4-3 lead. Schwarber had already hit a home run off starter Luis Castillo, but Crockett froze Schwarber with a 2-2 slider for a strikeout to end the threat.

Video: CHC@CIN: Crockett K's Schwarber in Reds debut

"Just go out there and attack the zone," Crockett said. "I am up here to throw strikes and get guys out. I wanted to get ahead in the count and then was able to work some swings and misses to get the punchout."

Crockett, 26, was called up from Triple-A on Thursday in a move that sent struggling reliever Wandy Peralta to Louisville. Riggleman said on Thursday that Crockett is a guy he'd like to use against left-handers in matchup situations, and that was precisely the case against Schwarber on Friday.

"I felt that it was the move that needed to be made in the game, but I had no real idea about what to expect," Riggleman said. "He obviously found a way to relax himself and let his talent come out because he threw three pretty good pitches."

Brian Scott Rippee is a reporter for MLB.com based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds, Kyle Crockett, Scott Schebler

Senzel flourishing, but no promotion in sight

No space on Reds' roster yet for top prospect; Bailey halts rehab assignment
MLB.com

PITTSBURGH -- There's long been an adage in baseball that if a player can hit, a team will find a place for him to play. Second baseman Nick Senzel, the Reds' top prospect, has been on an offensive tear for Triple-A Louisville lately, but there is no promotion imminent.

"We just want to make sure he has a place to play," Reds general manager Nick Krall said on Friday. "He's been progressing well, and he's making good contact. We feel he's played well in Triple-A, especially since he's come back from the injury the past two weeks."

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PITTSBURGH -- There's long been an adage in baseball that if a player can hit, a team will find a place for him to play. Second baseman Nick Senzel, the Reds' top prospect, has been on an offensive tear for Triple-A Louisville lately, but there is no promotion imminent.

"We just want to make sure he has a place to play," Reds general manager Nick Krall said on Friday. "He's been progressing well, and he's making good contact. We feel he's played well in Triple-A, especially since he's come back from the injury the past two weeks."

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Ranked No. 5 overall by MLBPipeline, the 22-year-old Senzel has played well since he returned from missing nearly a month with symptoms of vertigo.

Over 15 games since being activated from the disabled list on May 29, Senzel has a .339/.412/.458 slash line with seven doubles, eight walks and 11 RBIs.

Louisville moved Senzel up to the leadoff spot for the first time over his past five games, and he's batted .522 (12-for-23). It's raised his overall slash line to .299/.376/.458 over 37 games.

"It allows him to get more at-bats," Krall said of Senzel batting at the top of the order. "You have to make up for some of that lost time that he had at the end of last year and the middle of this year."

At the big league level, the Reds have Scooter Gennett at second base and Eugenio Suarez at third base -- Senzel's natural position when he was taken No. 2 overall in the 2016 MLB Draft. Both players are having All-Star-caliber seasons, which makes it tough for Cincinnati to open up a spot.

Suarez was originally a shortstop, and Gennett has limited experience in left field. But Gennett has also been dealing with a sore right shoulder for much of the season that has affected his throwing.

The Reds have not gotten consistent hitting from their four-man outfield rotation this season. Could Senzel be an option for the outfield, namely in left field?

"I don't want to rule out anything, but he obviously hasn't played any outfield to this point," Krall said. "He's an athletic kid who already moved to second base pretty easily from third base. He's a good runner. He can do a lot of different things."

The other option would be to make a trade. Gennett, left fielder Adam Duvall or center fielder Billy Hamilton would seem to be the most available to be moved.

For now, Senzel will just keep playing for Louisville and wait for a call.

"He's probably close to being ready for the big leagues," Krall said. "We want to see him just continue to progress and continue to work on what it will take to be a regular big leaguer."

Video: CIN@ARI: Bailey K's Goldschmidt in the 1st

Bailey stops rehab assignment

Reds pitcher Homer Bailey's rehab assignment at Louisville has been put on hold because of continued right knee soreness. Bailey's scheduled start vs. Toledo on Saturday was scratched.

"This is his call. He pulled himself off of the rehab," Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman said. "It just wasn't feeling right. I'm not sure on what the details are. He wanted to stop the clock running on his rehab time. That's what we're going to do. He'll get back on it when he says he's feeling right."

In his only rehab game for Louisville on Monday, Bailey pitched three innings and gave up five earned runs and six hits over three innings with one walk and one strikeout. All five runs were scored in the third inning.

On June 1, following a demotion to the bullpen, Bailey went on the 10-day disabled list with right knee inflammation. He last started for the Reds on May 28, and he never worked in relief before the injury was revealed.

There was no immediate timetable for when Bailey might resume the rehab assignment.

"He'll have to be down for a minimum of seven days," Krall said. "We'll see how the treatment goes and see how it works out, and we'll go from there."

Video: CIN@KC: Hamilton crashes into the wall after the grab

Hamilton's knee banged up

According to the Reds' outfield rotation, Hamilton was not scheduled to start on Friday vs. the Pirates, but there was also another reason he was out of the starting lineup. The center fielder hit his right knee hard into the wall while making a great running catch in the ninth inning on Wednesday vs. the Royals.

"If he's going to get a day off, it's a good one," Riggleman said. "He was banging around out there pretty good. I was going to give him one day off in this series, just to keep the other guys sharp. This would be the day. The next two after that, I'm not sure who will be out."

Hamilton has suffered varied injuries the past several years from trying to make spectacular defensive plays. Riggleman has no plans to have Hamilton dial his effort back.

"I never would do that," Riggleman said. "That's his tool to play defense and do things out there nobody else can do. We can't really have him not going as hard as he can. He's pretty aware. He's usually got a good clock in his head about how far that wall is. You've seen him put his foot on the wall and jump. But that one, he kind of banged his knee deep into the turf and/or the wall."

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds, Homer Bailey, Billy Hamilton

Reds start Day 2 with college OF Spillane

Cincinnati picks five right-handed pitchers on Tuesday
MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- After making their first three selections on Monday night, the Reds made eight more picks on Day 2 of the 2018 MLB Draft.

• Draft Tracker: Follow every Reds Draft pick

CINCINNATI -- After making their first three selections on Monday night, the Reds made eight more picks on Day 2 of the 2018 MLB Draft.

• Draft Tracker: Follow every Reds Draft pick

The Reds took Florida third baseman Jonathan India with the fifth overall pick to begin the draft, followed by right-handers Lyon Richardson and Josiah Gray at Nos. 47 and 62, respectively.

• Day 1 recap: Reds take India at No. 5 overall

Tuesday consisted of Rounds 3-10. Here is a pick-by-pick look at who Cincinnati drafted on Day 2 of the MLB Draft.

Round 3: OF Bren Spillane, Illinois
Cincinnati started Day 2 with Spillane, who hit 23 home runs, slashed .389/.498/.903 and drove in 60 runs in 50 games this season for Illinois. He struck out 57 times and drew 36 walks in 175 at-bats. Spillane was named 2018 Big Ten Player of the Year and is the highest-drafted position player in program history.

"It has been an honor," Spillane said. "That is something you dream of when you get to Illinois, to go down as one of the highest-drafted players."

Spillane has plus power and has been a core producer in the Illini lineup.

"I would like to shorten up my swing a little bit," Spillane said. "I think that goes hand in hand with strikeouts. Pitch selection is another thing. I know there will be a lot of good pitchers with good stuff. You are going to have to have a really good game plan going up there to be successful."

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

Spillane was announced as an outfielder, but he played third base for the Illini in 2018, as well as right field during his freshman and sophomore seasons.

"He is a very athletic kid," Reds vice president for amateur scouting Chris Buckley said. "We have seen him play first base and the outfield. He is definitely athletic enough to stay in the outfield in right or left and has big power.

Spillane was also named Collegiate Baseball Newspaper's National Player of the Year. The slot value for this selection is $716,000.

Round 4 (109th overall): OF Mike Siani, William Penn Charter School (Penn.)
Siani is a University of Virginia commit with impressive speed and athleticism in center field. The left-handed hitter batted .361 and stole 19 bases in his senior season and was named Pennsylvania's Gatorade Player of the Year last week. He committed to the Cavaliers as a freshman.

Buckley thinks Siani is the best athlete the club drafted on Tuesday.

"He's been on the scene for quite a while now, so we saw a lot of him last summer," Buckley said. "We were thrilled he was still up there. He has a chance to be a complete player."

Round 5 (139th overall): RHP Ryan Campbell, University of Illinois-Chicago
Campbell went 8-3 with a 1.53 ERA in his senior season for the Flames. He struck out 68 and walked 19 over 94 innings while yielding 16 earned runs. Campbell has a heavy-sinking two-seam fastball that sits between 90-93 mph with a changeup and slider mixed in. His offspeed stuff is still developing and something he's been working to get more consistent with

"I kind of mixed up my slider grip from the year before and I think my changeup may be better than my slider," Campbell said. "I feel like they have both gotten better with every start pretty much."

The slot value of the selection is $382,900.

Round 6 (169th overall): RHP Yomil Maysonet, P.J. Education School (Puerto Rico)
Listed at 6-foot-2, 187 pounds, Maysonet is a right-hander out of Carolina, P.R., with a fastball that features good sinking action. Maysonet was named to Perfect Game's Puerto Rico/Canada all-region first team and is committed to Miami-Dade Junior College

"He has been one of their more high-profile guys," Buckley said. "Big guy, good arm. His breaking stuff has to improve, but he is a young guy that wants to get started. Good body and good arm. We are excited."

Round 7 (199th overall): C Jay Schuyler, San Diego
Schuyler is listed as a catcher and hit .342 with seven home runs and 38 RBIs in 55 games during his junior season at San Diego. He struck out just 30 times and drew 24 walks. Schuyler is 6-foot-1, 195 pounds, and played mostly first base while batting cleanup this season. He has also played in the outfield.

Round 8 (229th overall): RHP Matt Pidich, Pittsburgh
Pidich is right-hander who throws a lot of strikes. He stuck out 99 and walked 26 over 91 1/3 innings in 2018. Pidich sits between 89-92 mph with his fastball and also has a cutter, curveball and changeup, which is his best pitch. Pidich went 6-2 with a 3.05 ERA in 15 starts during his senior season.

Round 9: (259th overall): RHP Andrew McDonald, Virginia Tech
McDonald fluctuated between the rotation and the bullpen his first three seasons at Vriginia Tech before moving into a relief role full-time as a senior. He made 29 appearances and allowed 27 earned runs in 54 2/3 innings, striking out 67 batters and walking 27.

"He came to our workout the other day and is quite impressive," Buckley said. "We knew we wanted to get him."

McDonald is a Cincinnati area native and attended nearby Mason High School.

Round 10 (289th overall): RHP A.J. Moore, Kennesaw State
Moore anchored Kennesaw State's weekend rotation as a senior. He posted a 5-3 record with a 3.24 ERA, striking out 87 batters and walking 47 over 80 2/3 innings. Moore has a tall frame at 6-foot-4, 205 pounds, with a fastball that sits between 88-93 mph, as well as a changeup and a slider. He was a starter all four years while also making sporadic relief appearances as a freshman.

Moore was the fifth pitcher (all right-handers) the Reds selected on Tuesday.

"We got a lot of pitching today," Buckley said. "Usually, as you go deeper, some of those guys tend to wind up in the bullpen. But we think some of this group has a chance to start. We tried to round it out and be balanced."

The Draft concludes on Wednesday, with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at noon ET.

Brian Scott Rippee is a reporter for MLB.com based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds