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Trammell wins Futures MVP; Greene brings heat

Duo offers high-octane peek at impressive talent in Reds' pipeline
MLB.com

WASHINGTON -- Reds Minor League outfielder Taylor Trammell had just accepted the Future Games MVP trophy Sunday evening and had said all the right things about being thankful for the opportunity, thrilled to be part of the event and happy he'd been at his best on a large stage.

But he kept circling the conversation back to a guy sitting on the other side of the clubhouse, to another youngster Cincinnati is building a bright and shiny future around.

WASHINGTON -- Reds Minor League outfielder Taylor Trammell had just accepted the Future Games MVP trophy Sunday evening and had said all the right things about being thankful for the opportunity, thrilled to be part of the event and happy he'd been at his best on a large stage.

But he kept circling the conversation back to a guy sitting on the other side of the clubhouse, to another youngster Cincinnati is building a bright and shiny future around.

Box score

"Hunter Greene is 18 years old and throwing 102 mph," Trammell kept saying. "Did he hit 103? He didn't throw a fastball under 100, right? The potential for him is just limitless."

Video: WLD@USA: Greene K's Matias swinging in the 3rd inning

This was a day for the Reds to celebrate what they are building. Trammell, 20, homered and tripled, and Greene, 18, blew up the radar gun at Nationals Park as their Team USA beat the World, 10-6 -- an eight-homer slugfest in the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game.

:: 2018 Futures Game coverage ::

On a day when baseball's best players put on a showcase of blazing fastballs and eye-popping power, no organization had more to be happy about than the Reds. They've been one of baseball's surprise first-half stories, going 40-38 under interim manager Jim Riggleman.

Through it all, the Reds have made it clear that the best is yet to come, thanks to a Minor League system being replenished and quickly. So here were two of their best young players proving the point. Trammell is at Class A Advanced Daytona, Greene at Class A Dayton. Trammell homered in the bottom of the sixth inning -- a tiebreaking solo shot that was projected to travel 438 feet by Statcast™ -- and then banged a triple off the center-field wall in the eighth.

Now about that triple. Trammell rounded first base and signaled "two" with his fingers, thinking he'd homered for a second time.

"I hit the ball and thought I got it," he said. "I looked over to the dugout, and they were going crazy. I was like, `I got it.' I was just having a little bit of fun with those guys. I didn't see it hit the wall, but when I saw the center fielder running, I was like, `Oh, this can't be happening.' I'm not going to hear the end of it."

Hey, slow down. How about some perspective? He'd just had a day he's likely to remember for the rest of his life. That's what he set out to do, right? That's why they play games like this.

"I talked to Cespedes Family BBQ about it [before the game]," he said. "It's an All-Star Game. I'm going to have as much fun as possible without trying to go overboard or anything like that. I'm just having a blast.

Video: Taylor Trammell discusses meeting Hank Aaron

"I'm very happy my family got to see me perform today. I'm glad I got to showcase what I had to the world. I'm very thankful for the Futures Game and the Reds organization for selecting me. I'm glad I got to bring some hardware to Cincinnati."

One of his teammates at Daytona, first baseman Bruce Yari, had told him to bring a souvenir back from the Futures Game. As Trammell put it, "You know when you were in preschool someone would go on a trip to Europe or someplace like that, and they'd bring back some taffy or something to the whole class."

He pointed toward the MVP trophy and said, "I think that right there is good enough to give them back. Bruce, that's for you."

Tweet from @Reds: .@Taytram24 is the first #Reds prospect to win the Larry Doby Award as MVP of the #FuturesGame! 🏆 pic.twitter.com/GVyHJhpgUC

Back to Greene. He pitched 1 1/3 innings and allowed two hits and a run -- a home run by White Sox prospect Luis Alexander Basabe.

When asked what pitch Basabe hit, Greene said: "102 mph, inside [part of the plate]. He turned on it. I tip my cap to that guy."

Video: WLD@USA: Basabe homers off 102-mph pitch from Greene

To be precise: 102.3 mph was the pitch Basabe hit. According to Statcast™, no pitch that fast has been hit for a home run in the Majors since Rafael Devers took Aroldis Chapman deep last season on a 102.8-mph heater.

"It's amazing to get the opportunity to play at this stage," Greene said, "and to be with the best guys in the Minor Leagues is really cool. To see everybody do their thing and to play the game we love. It's a great way to go compete and then go back to our season and to learn what the guys at the higher level are playing like and what they know."

Video: WLD@USA: Greene talks playing in Futures Game

He'd been assigned Bryce Harper's locker in the Nationals clubhouse and said that just added to the experience. That and competing against the best prospects.

"It's special," he said. "I'm taking it all in as much as I can. I'm going to be able to say I pitched against these guys when they get called up."

That goes both ways. Plenty of these guys will say they got to play with and against Greene and Trammell in the Futures Game. That's likely to mean something, too.

Richard Justice has been a reporter for MLB.com since 2011. Read his columns, listen to his podcast and follow him on Twitter at @RichardJustice.

Cincinnati Reds, Hunter Greene, Taylor Trammell

Reds get pitchers Marinan, Zabala from Dodgers

Reliever Floro, Minor Leaguer Neal head to LA
MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Veteran right-handed reliever Dylan Floro proved to be a nice find for the Reds in the offseason. Floro was signed as a Minor League free agent in December, and his stock increased enough that he could be flipped for a coveted prospect.

On Wednesday, the Reds traded Floro, Minor League right-hander Zach Neal and international signing bonus pool space to the Dodgers for Minor League right-handed pitchers James Marinan and Aneurys Zabala. Marinan was ranked No. 21 among the Dodgers Top 30 prospects, according to MLB Pipeline.

View Full Game Coverage

CINCINNATI -- Veteran right-handed reliever Dylan Floro proved to be a nice find for the Reds in the offseason. Floro was signed as a Minor League free agent in December, and his stock increased enough that he could be flipped for a coveted prospect.

On Wednesday, the Reds traded Floro, Minor League right-hander Zach Neal and international signing bonus pool space to the Dodgers for Minor League right-handed pitchers James Marinan and Aneurys Zabala. Marinan was ranked No. 21 among the Dodgers Top 30 prospects, according to MLB Pipeline.

View Full Game Coverage

Called up from Triple-A in mid-April, the 27-year-old Floro posted a 2.72 ERA in 25 games and 36 1/3 innings for the Reds this season. That included his 1 2/3 scoreless innings during Tuesday's 12-8 loss in 12 innings.

"We took the opportunity to trade from an area of relative depth to acquire promising future assets. Marinan is someone that was very high on our Draft board in 2017," Reds president of baseball operations Dick Williams said. "We are pleased to see the team performing on the field but recognize we have to keep pushing forward opportunistically to acquire talent."

Video: CWS@CIN: Floro retires Tilson, strands 2 in the 8th

In three starts this season for the Dodgers' rookie-level Arizona League club, the 19-year-old Marinan has a 0.84 ERA, and he has a 1.30 ERA in the past two seasons.

Zabala, 21, is 2-2 with a 4.86 ERA in 24 relief appearances for Class A Great Lakes.

Marinan will report to Rookie-level Billings and Zabala is headed to Class A Dayton.

Reed, Rainey recalled for bullpen
With Floro traded and a 12-inning game on Tuesday, reinforcements were needed on Wednesday, so Cincinnati recalled left-handed pitcher Cody Reed and right-hander Tanner Rainey from Triple-A Louisville. To clear a roster spot, utility player Brandon Dixon was optioned to Louisville.

The moves left the Reds with a three-man bench, plus a fourth in reliever and capable hitter Michael Lorenzen.

"We needed a little coverage," Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman said. "We used a lot of guys last night. For some of the guys, it's been three days in a row or two days in a row with a fairly good number of pitches. So, we needed the extra pitcher more than a bench player for a day."

Video: CIN@PHI: Reed K's Lively to strike out the side

It's possible the club could recall someone for the bench on Friday, ahead of a three-game series vs. the Cubs at Wrigley Field.

In 12 games for Louisville, Reed is 2-6 with a 4.57 ERA. He opened the season in the big leagues with Cincinnati and had a 5.40 ERA in four games that included one start.

Reed has pitched well lately, with each of his last four starts being at least seven innings. What's been the difference after some struggles earlier this season and last season?

"Just not be so uptight like I was last year," Reed replied. "I'm just letting it loose and doing my thing and staying in the strike zone more and throwing all my pitches for strikes. I actually looked up most of the hits I've given up this year, and they've mostly been in the first two pitches. So I know I'm in the zone and I'm attacking guys, going after them right away. Hits are going to come, but hits also lead to outs."

Wednesday was Reed's turn to start for Louisville. In his previous start vs. Toledo on Friday, he gave up eight earned runs and 10 hits over seven innings. However, seven of those runs came in the first inning before he turned things around.

"That ballgame the other day was the talk of our organization," Riggleman said.

"We didn't make a couple of plays, but that's just the way it is," Reed said. "That was big to somewhat keep my team in the game after giving up seven in the first. That's hard to chip away. I felt the best about that outing than all the other ones. I think I had a game where I struck out 10 or 11 and that one was OK. Going seven innings after giving up seven runs in the first is more impressive internally for me."

Rainey has a 1.25 ERA in 25 appearances for Louisville. This is his fourth big league callup this season.

Iglesias giving up homers
Reds closer Raisel Iglesias wasn't available Wednesday after he pitched the previous three days. Iglesias blew his third save in 19 tries during Tuesday's loss, giving up the game-tying homer to Avisail Garcia in the top of the ninth inning. It was the sixth homer Iglesias has given up in 35 games this season after he allowed five in 63 games during 2017.

"I don't have an explanation for it," Riggleman said. "He was throwing real hard last night. The first hitter he faced, he threw 97 [mph]. I was like, 'Wow. He's firing.' A hot hitter got him. That guy is swinging the bat good. I'm sure he didn't quite hit his spot and he got him. I don't think it had to do with three days in a row."

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds, James Marinan, Cody Reed, Aneurys Zabala

Senzel undergoes surgery on finger fracture

MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Reds prospect Nick Senzel underwent surgery to reduce a fracture in his right index finger on Thursday. There was no damage to the tendon in that finger.

The surgery was performed in New York by Dr. Thomas Graham, according to a release from the Reds.

View Full Game Coverage

CINCINNATI -- Reds prospect Nick Senzel underwent surgery to reduce a fracture in his right index finger on Thursday. There was no damage to the tendon in that finger.

The surgery was performed in New York by Dr. Thomas Graham, according to a release from the Reds.

View Full Game Coverage

Senzel, Cincinnati's top prospect and No. 5 in all of baseball according to MLB Pipeline, sustained the injury in a game with Triple-A Louisville last Friday. He fielded a ground ball in the first inning that took a high hop toward him, which he thought had jammed his finger. A couple of plays later, he was relaying a throw as the cutoff man and felt his finger pop as he released the baseball. Senzel quickly exited the game as the pain intensified and the finger began to swell.

Tweet from @LilSenzii: Surgery was a success #RoadToRecovery

Senzel thrived this season in Louisville, slashing .310/.378/.509 in 44 games with 12 doubles, six home runs and 25 RBIs. He missed nearly a month earlier in the season while dealing with symptoms of vertigo.

While there was no set plan for when Senzel would be promoted to the Majors, Reds manager Jim Riggleman acknowledged he thought there was a good chance would join the big league club by the end of the regular season. Senzel echoed those sentiments during a teleconference on Sunday.

There is no timetable for Senzel's return, but he will rehab the injury in Cincinnati.

Brian Rippee is a reporter for MLB.com based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds

Senzel eager to get to work on return from injury

MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Nick Senzel experienced his first Reds game at Great American Ball Park on Saturday and will be spending the next couple of months in Cincinnati. But these occurrences did not happen for the reasons he was hoping for.

The Reds' top prospect will undergo surgery on Tuesday to repair a torn tendon in his right index finger, after suffering the injury in a game with Triple-A Louisville on Friday night. Senzel fielded a hard ground ball that hopped up toward his chest. He thought he'd suffered a fairly normal jammed finger. A couple of plays later, when he was making a relay throw to home plate, he heard a pop and his finger immediately began to swell up. After the pain intensified, he exited the game. Senzel thinks the ground ball was the leading cause.

View Full Game Coverage

CINCINNATI -- Nick Senzel experienced his first Reds game at Great American Ball Park on Saturday and will be spending the next couple of months in Cincinnati. But these occurrences did not happen for the reasons he was hoping for.

The Reds' top prospect will undergo surgery on Tuesday to repair a torn tendon in his right index finger, after suffering the injury in a game with Triple-A Louisville on Friday night. Senzel fielded a hard ground ball that hopped up toward his chest. He thought he'd suffered a fairly normal jammed finger. A couple of plays later, when he was making a relay throw to home plate, he heard a pop and his finger immediately began to swell up. After the pain intensified, he exited the game. Senzel thinks the ground ball was the leading cause.

View Full Game Coverage

"A couple batters later, the distance of the throw and the pressure I had to put on the baseball, the tendon -- right when I threw it -- just ripped a chunk of my bone off," Senzel said. "I heard it and knew it right away. The ground ball definitely played a major role in it. I am not just going to throw a ball and hear it pop. That is not how it works."

Senzel is having the surgery done in Cincinnati and will rehab the injury there, as well. It has been a frustrating season for the Reds' 2016 first-round Draft pick. He missed nearly a month while dealing with symptoms of vertigo and was playing well after he got back on the field.

Tweet from @LilSenzii: So hard to be frustrated with the raining support that has come my way #thankyouagain #seeyousoon

"I was going in knowing that something was wrong," Senzel said. "I was going in there knowing that I definitely was going to miss some time, because it was still swollen and it currently still hurts now. I was going in mentally prepared that I was definitely going to miss some time. I was kind of shocked that I was going to miss the rest of the season."

Senzel hit .310 with 12 doubles, two triples, six homers, 25 RBIs and recorded eight stolen bases in 44 games for Louisville. He sensed he was close to realizing his dream of being called up to the big leagues.

"I felt like [my injury] could not have come at a worse time, to be honest with you," Senzel said. "I felt like I was close [to the Majors]. I felt like I was right there. I felt like I was ready. ... I know a lot of people felt that way. Just working my way up -- and knowing and having conversations with my agent and agency -- I was right there."

Senzel took in Saturday's win from Reds owner Bob Castellini's box, which was hardly the first-time experience he'd envisioned at Great American Ball Park. Senzel said the support he's gotten from the organization has been uplifting and that he has accepted his fate and is now focused on returning stronger.

"I think, at this point, it's kind of accepting that I won't be playing in another game," Senzel said. "You just move on, and I get surgery Tuesday and get to work on getting this thing better. I start my rehab on Wednesday. Time to get to work to where I need to be."

Brian Scott Rippee is a reporter for MLB.com based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds, Nick Senzel

MLB's No. 6 overall prospect Senzel out for year

Infielder to undergo surgery for torn tendon in right index finger
MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Reds top prospect Nick Senzel will undergo surgery on Tuesday to repair a torn tendon in his right index finger and will miss the remainder of the season. Senzel suffered the injury in a game with Triple-A Louisville on Friday night.

Senzel was pulled in the first inning after fielding a ball and making a throw. Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman seemed to think Senzel suffered the injury during the throw.

View Full Game Coverage

CINCINNATI -- Reds top prospect Nick Senzel will undergo surgery on Tuesday to repair a torn tendon in his right index finger and will miss the remainder of the season. Senzel suffered the injury in a game with Triple-A Louisville on Friday night.

Senzel was pulled in the first inning after fielding a ball and making a throw. Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman seemed to think Senzel suffered the injury during the throw.

View Full Game Coverage

"I don't think it was a bad hop," Riggleman said. "I think he did it throwing."

Senzel hit .310 with 12 doubles, two triples, six home runs, 25 RBIs and eight stolen bases in 44 games for Louisville this season. He missed nearly a month earlier this season while dealing with vertigo. Senzel, 22, is rated as baseball's No. 6 overall prospect, per MLB Pipeline.

"It had been a challenging season from the start, but it helped me grow," Senzel said in a statement on social media. "I had a goal this season, and it was to make it to the big leagues and help the Cincinnati Reds win ballgames. Although I did not fulfull this goal, it will not stop my drive to continue to fulfill my dream."

While there were no plans in the immediate future to bring Senzel to the Major Leagues, it was thought to be a strong possibility he'd be up with the Reds toward the end of the season.

"It was never anything specific, and I never talked to [Reds general manager] Nick [Krall] about when do we think he will be here or anything like that," Riggleman said. "Just hearing about his progress, you got a sense that he might be here before September and certainly in all liklihood in September, at least. I am not sure where that stands now."

Schebler set to be be reinstated
Scott Schebler was back at Great American Ball Park on Saturday, and Riggleman said the team will make room to activate the outfielder on Sunday. Schebler was placed on the bereavement list on Thursday and is eligble to be reinstated after three days.

Schebler is batting .281 with nine home runs and 28 RBIs in 57 games this season and is part of a four-man outfield Riggleman has been navigating with Billy Hamilton, Adam Duvall and Jesse Winker. Phillip Ervin was called up from Louisville on Thursday in Schebler's abscence.

Crockett gets job done in Reds debut
Kyle Crockett made his Reds debut in an important spot in Friday's 6-3 win over the Cubs. The left-hander was brought in to face Chicago slugger Kyle Schwarber with two men on base and two outs in the sixth inning as Cincinnati clung to a 4-3 lead. Schwarber had already hit a home run off starter Luis Castillo, but Crockett froze Schwarber with a 2-2 slider for a strikeout to end the threat.

Video: CHC@CIN: Crockett K's Schwarber in Reds debut

"Just go out there and attack the zone," Crockett said. "I am up here to throw strikes and get guys out. I wanted to get ahead in the count and then was able to work some swings and misses to get the punchout."

Crockett, 26, was called up from Triple-A on Thursday in a move that sent struggling reliever Wandy Peralta to Louisville. Riggleman said on Thursday that Crockett is a guy he'd like to use against left-handers in matchup situations, and that was precisely the case against Schwarber on Friday.

"I felt that it was the move that needed to be made in the game, but I had no real idea about what to expect," Riggleman said. "He obviously found a way to relax himself and let his talent come out because he threw three pretty good pitches."

Brian Scott Rippee is a reporter for MLB.com based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds, Kyle Crockett, Scott Schebler

Senzel flourishing, but no promotion in sight

No space on Reds' roster yet for top prospect; Bailey halts rehab assignment
MLB.com

PITTSBURGH -- There's long been an adage in baseball that if a player can hit, a team will find a place for him to play. Second baseman Nick Senzel, the Reds' top prospect, has been on an offensive tear for Triple-A Louisville lately, but there is no promotion imminent.

"We just want to make sure he has a place to play," Reds general manager Nick Krall said on Friday. "He's been progressing well, and he's making good contact. We feel he's played well in Triple-A, especially since he's come back from the injury the past two weeks."

View Full Game Coverage

PITTSBURGH -- There's long been an adage in baseball that if a player can hit, a team will find a place for him to play. Second baseman Nick Senzel, the Reds' top prospect, has been on an offensive tear for Triple-A Louisville lately, but there is no promotion imminent.

"We just want to make sure he has a place to play," Reds general manager Nick Krall said on Friday. "He's been progressing well, and he's making good contact. We feel he's played well in Triple-A, especially since he's come back from the injury the past two weeks."

View Full Game Coverage

Ranked No. 5 overall by MLBPipeline, the 22-year-old Senzel has played well since he returned from missing nearly a month with symptoms of vertigo.

Over 15 games since being activated from the disabled list on May 29, Senzel has a .339/.412/.458 slash line with seven doubles, eight walks and 11 RBIs.

Louisville moved Senzel up to the leadoff spot for the first time over his past five games, and he's batted .522 (12-for-23). It's raised his overall slash line to .299/.376/.458 over 37 games.

"It allows him to get more at-bats," Krall said of Senzel batting at the top of the order. "You have to make up for some of that lost time that he had at the end of last year and the middle of this year."

At the big league level, the Reds have Scooter Gennett at second base and Eugenio Suarez at third base -- Senzel's natural position when he was taken No. 2 overall in the 2016 MLB Draft. Both players are having All-Star-caliber seasons, which makes it tough for Cincinnati to open up a spot.

Suarez was originally a shortstop, and Gennett has limited experience in left field. But Gennett has also been dealing with a sore right shoulder for much of the season that has affected his throwing.

The Reds have not gotten consistent hitting from their four-man outfield rotation this season. Could Senzel be an option for the outfield, namely in left field?

"I don't want to rule out anything, but he obviously hasn't played any outfield to this point," Krall said. "He's an athletic kid who already moved to second base pretty easily from third base. He's a good runner. He can do a lot of different things."

The other option would be to make a trade. Gennett, left fielder Adam Duvall or center fielder Billy Hamilton would seem to be the most available to be moved.

For now, Senzel will just keep playing for Louisville and wait for a call.

"He's probably close to being ready for the big leagues," Krall said. "We want to see him just continue to progress and continue to work on what it will take to be a regular big leaguer."

Video: CIN@ARI: Bailey K's Goldschmidt in the 1st

Bailey stops rehab assignment

Reds pitcher Homer Bailey's rehab assignment at Louisville has been put on hold because of continued right knee soreness. Bailey's scheduled start vs. Toledo on Saturday was scratched.

"This is his call. He pulled himself off of the rehab," Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman said. "It just wasn't feeling right. I'm not sure on what the details are. He wanted to stop the clock running on his rehab time. That's what we're going to do. He'll get back on it when he says he's feeling right."

In his only rehab game for Louisville on Monday, Bailey pitched three innings and gave up five earned runs and six hits over three innings with one walk and one strikeout. All five runs were scored in the third inning.

On June 1, following a demotion to the bullpen, Bailey went on the 10-day disabled list with right knee inflammation. He last started for the Reds on May 28, and he never worked in relief before the injury was revealed.

There was no immediate timetable for when Bailey might resume the rehab assignment.

"He'll have to be down for a minimum of seven days," Krall said. "We'll see how the treatment goes and see how it works out, and we'll go from there."

Video: CIN@KC: Hamilton crashes into the wall after the grab

Hamilton's knee banged up

According to the Reds' outfield rotation, Hamilton was not scheduled to start on Friday vs. the Pirates, but there was also another reason he was out of the starting lineup. The center fielder hit his right knee hard into the wall while making a great running catch in the ninth inning on Wednesday vs. the Royals.

"If he's going to get a day off, it's a good one," Riggleman said. "He was banging around out there pretty good. I was going to give him one day off in this series, just to keep the other guys sharp. This would be the day. The next two after that, I'm not sure who will be out."

Hamilton has suffered varied injuries the past several years from trying to make spectacular defensive plays. Riggleman has no plans to have Hamilton dial his effort back.

"I never would do that," Riggleman said. "That's his tool to play defense and do things out there nobody else can do. We can't really have him not going as hard as he can. He's pretty aware. He's usually got a good clock in his head about how far that wall is. You've seen him put his foot on the wall and jump. But that one, he kind of banged his knee deep into the turf and/or the wall."

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds, Homer Bailey, Billy Hamilton

Reds start Day 2 with college OF Spillane

Cincinnati picks five right-handed pitchers on Tuesday
MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- After making their first three selections on Monday night, the Reds made eight more picks on Day 2 of the 2018 MLB Draft.

• Draft Tracker: Follow every Reds Draft pick

CINCINNATI -- After making their first three selections on Monday night, the Reds made eight more picks on Day 2 of the 2018 MLB Draft.

• Draft Tracker: Follow every Reds Draft pick

The Reds took Florida third baseman Jonathan India with the fifth overall pick to begin the draft, followed by right-handers Lyon Richardson and Josiah Gray at Nos. 47 and 62, respectively.

• Day 1 recap: Reds take India at No. 5 overall

Tuesday consisted of Rounds 3-10. Here is a pick-by-pick look at who Cincinnati drafted on Day 2 of the MLB Draft.

Round 3: OF Bren Spillane, Illinois
Cincinnati started Day 2 with Spillane, who hit 23 home runs, slashed .389/.498/.903 and drove in 60 runs in 50 games this season for Illinois. He struck out 57 times and drew 36 walks in 175 at-bats. Spillane was named 2018 Big Ten Player of the Year and is the highest-drafted position player in program history.

"It has been an honor," Spillane said. "That is something you dream of when you get to Illinois, to go down as one of the highest-drafted players."

Spillane has plus power and has been a core producer in the Illini lineup.

"I would like to shorten up my swing a little bit," Spillane said. "I think that goes hand in hand with strikeouts. Pitch selection is another thing. I know there will be a lot of good pitchers with good stuff. You are going to have to have a really good game plan going up there to be successful."

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

Spillane was announced as an outfielder, but he played third base for the Illini in 2018, as well as right field during his freshman and sophomore seasons.

"He is a very athletic kid," Reds vice president for amateur scouting Chris Buckley said. "We have seen him play first base and the outfield. He is definitely athletic enough to stay in the outfield in right or left and has big power.

Spillane was also named Collegiate Baseball Newspaper's National Player of the Year. The slot value for this selection is $716,000.

Round 4 (109th overall): OF Mike Siani, William Penn Charter School (Penn.)
Siani is a University of Virginia commit with impressive speed and athleticism in center field. The left-handed hitter batted .361 and stole 19 bases in his senior season and was named Pennsylvania's Gatorade Player of the Year last week. He committed to the Cavaliers as a freshman.

Buckley thinks Siani is the best athlete the club drafted on Tuesday.

"He's been on the scene for quite a while now, so we saw a lot of him last summer," Buckley said. "We were thrilled he was still up there. He has a chance to be a complete player."

Round 5 (139th overall): RHP Ryan Campbell, University of Illinois-Chicago
Campbell went 8-3 with a 1.53 ERA in his senior season for the Flames. He struck out 68 and walked 19 over 94 innings while yielding 16 earned runs. Campbell has a heavy-sinking two-seam fastball that sits between 90-93 mph with a changeup and slider mixed in. His offspeed stuff is still developing and something he's been working to get more consistent with

"I kind of mixed up my slider grip from the year before and I think my changeup may be better than my slider," Campbell said. "I feel like they have both gotten better with every start pretty much."

The slot value of the selection is $382,900.

Round 6 (169th overall): RHP Yomil Maysonet, P.J. Education School (Puerto Rico)
Listed at 6-foot-2, 187 pounds, Maysonet is a right-hander out of Carolina, P.R., with a fastball that features good sinking action. Maysonet was named to Perfect Game's Puerto Rico/Canada all-region first team and is committed to Miami-Dade Junior College

"He has been one of their more high-profile guys," Buckley said. "Big guy, good arm. His breaking stuff has to improve, but he is a young guy that wants to get started. Good body and good arm. We are excited."

Round 7 (199th overall): C Jay Schuyler, San Diego
Schuyler is listed as a catcher and hit .342 with seven home runs and 38 RBIs in 55 games during his junior season at San Diego. He struck out just 30 times and drew 24 walks. Schuyler is 6-foot-1, 195 pounds, and played mostly first base while batting cleanup this season. He has also played in the outfield.

Round 8 (229th overall): RHP Matt Pidich, Pittsburgh
Pidich is right-hander who throws a lot of strikes. He stuck out 99 and walked 26 over 91 1/3 innings in 2018. Pidich sits between 89-92 mph with his fastball and also has a cutter, curveball and changeup, which is his best pitch. Pidich went 6-2 with a 3.05 ERA in 15 starts during his senior season.

Round 9: (259th overall): RHP Andrew McDonald, Virginia Tech
McDonald fluctuated between the rotation and the bullpen his first three seasons at Vriginia Tech before moving into a relief role full-time as a senior. He made 29 appearances and allowed 27 earned runs in 54 2/3 innings, striking out 67 batters and walking 27.

"He came to our workout the other day and is quite impressive," Buckley said. "We knew we wanted to get him."

McDonald is a Cincinnati area native and attended nearby Mason High School.

Round 10 (289th overall): RHP A.J. Moore, Kennesaw State
Moore anchored Kennesaw State's weekend rotation as a senior. He posted a 5-3 record with a 3.24 ERA, striking out 87 batters and walking 47 over 80 2/3 innings. Moore has a tall frame at 6-foot-4, 205 pounds, with a fastball that sits between 88-93 mph, as well as a changeup and a slider. He was a starter all four years while also making sporadic relief appearances as a freshman.

Moore was the fifth pitcher (all right-handers) the Reds selected on Tuesday.

"We got a lot of pitching today," Buckley said. "Usually, as you go deeper, some of those guys tend to wind up in the bullpen. But we think some of this group has a chance to start. We tried to round it out and be balanced."

The Draft concludes on Wednesday, with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at noon ET.

Brian Scott Rippee is a reporter for MLB.com based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds

Reds select U. of Florida 3B India at No. 5

Right-handers Richardson, Gray also drafted on Day 1
MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Many players never forget where they were standing or sitting when they were taken in the MLB Draft. As it happened on Monday night during the 2018 Draft, University of Florida third baseman Jonathan India was standing on first base after earning a walk when the Reds selected him with the fifth overall pick.

Draft Tracker: Follow every Reds Draft pick

CINCINNATI -- Many players never forget where they were standing or sitting when they were taken in the MLB Draft. As it happened on Monday night during the 2018 Draft, University of Florida third baseman Jonathan India was standing on first base after earning a walk when the Reds selected him with the fifth overall pick.

Draft Tracker: Follow every Reds Draft pick

India, who was playing with the Gators in the NCAA regional tournament, was not immediately available to discuss his future with Cincinnati. As he spoke about it Tuesday, he realized that something was happening even before the plate appearance.

"I saw my family and friends where they usually sit, and I just saw them all hugging," India said. "I was like, 'That's pretty weird. I guess something good happened.' Then a bunch of fans started to yell and stuff. Yeah, I definitely knew during the game.

"I'm trying to focus on the game and play, and I hear that stuff, which is awesome. So I'm happy."

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

The Reds were also very happy they were able to land the 21-year-old.

"Best guy on the board," said Reds vice president of amateur scouting Chris Buckley. "We've seen a lot of him. A lot of my bigger guys live in Florida and he's been a really big player for a long time. We liked him quite a bit in high school."

Reds executives were watching India play on television from their Draft room, and perhaps they saw a good omen. In Florida's second regional game of the night against Florida Atlantic, he hit a booming home run to left field. Back in Gainesville, Fla., India was just keeping his emotions from getting out of whack.

"Stay humble and I still have a goal to finish to win a national championship for the team," India said. "Not think ahead and finish my season out."

During the regular season, India won the SEC Player of the Year Award after he batted .365 with 16 home runs and 40 RBIs in 54 games. A native of Coral Springs, Fla., India was semifinalist for the Golden Spikes Award.

"He's got an advanced offensive approach," said Reds president of baseball operations Dick Williams. "To do what he did this year in the best conference in the nation speaks to his ability. He's got a hit tool, but with more power than some of the other guys we were looking at it in that same range. [He is a] very good defensive player, that will serve him well given some flexibility with him in terms of moving him around. But he's played a very good third base and we took a good close look at that as well. I think we've got a kid who moves quick."

Video: Draft 2018: Reds draft 3B Jonathan India No. 5

Two years ago, the Reds took third baseman Nick Senzel second overall. During Spring Training, their current third baseman, Eugenio Suarez, was signed to a seven-year, $66 million contract.

As they've done in the past, the Reds didn't worry about current depth at positions and took who they felt was the best available player.

"We think he can help us in the big leagues in a relatively short period of time," Williams said. "But we think he's the most valuable asset. We've had this conversation a lot of times, you can never have too many good players. These guys, Suarez can play multiple positions. Senzel can play multiple positions. We're confident India can play multiple positions. We're starting to accumulate what we think are going to project as some really good hitters."

Tweet from @Reds: Welcome to #RedsCountry, @jonathan_india! pic.twitter.com/dYuWFk44Rv

The Reds believe that India is versatile enough to potentially play second base, shortstop, left field or right field. Senzel is currently being worked at second base with Triple-A Louisville and was tried at shortstop during his first big league camp at Spring Training. Suarez was originally a shortstop before moving to third base in 2016. India played shortstop in high school before moving to third base at Florida.

"He's very similar to Nick Senzel, very tough and a very aggressive kid and a real team guy," Buckley said. "Their coaches, who we know very well, just rave about the kid."

India wasn't considered a first-round talent in high school, and he wasn't tabbed as an elite prospect during his first couple of college seasons at Florida. But after two summers in the wooden-bat Cape Cod League, he turned the corner during his junior season.

"I just have a better feel with a wood bat," India said. "I learned the game more, mentally, and [my coach there] was real important for my success."

Williams was among the Reds' delegation in attendance in April when Florida played Auburn in a game that was billed as a pitching duel between Casey Mize and Brady Singer. In the first inning, it was India who stole the show when he slugged a two-run homer against Mize, who was taken No. 1 overall by the Tigers on Monday.

"That was a statement," Williams said. "To go up there with a full house, facing the best pitcher in the country. In the first at-bat, he hit a home run. That definitely made an impression on me. I don't put too much into any one at-bat. ... [but] that was a moment."

The fifth overall pick has a slot value of $5,946,400.

Cincinnati used its second-round pick (47th overall) to take right-handed pitcher Lyon Richardson, a high schooler from Jensen Beach, Fla. Richardson, who was ranked the No. 67 Draft prospect by MLBPipeline, was committed to play in college at the University of Florida but agreed to sign with the Reds on Tuesday.

"This is pretty much wrapped up and kicked in. I'm ready to get to work," Richardson said Tuesday afternoon.

Video: Draft 2018: Reds draft RHP Lyon Richardson No. 47

The 18-year-old Richardson focused on pitching as a senior, and scouting reports say he can touch 96-97 mph with his fastball. He was 7-0 with a 0.58 ERA in 10 games. Over 48 1/3 innings, Richardson allowed 16 hits, walked 20 and had 90 strikeouts.

In Competitive Balance Round B with the 72nd overall selection, the Reds took right-handed pitcher Josiah Gray out of LeMoyne College in Syracuse, N.Y. Gray, a 20-year-old ranked the No. 102 Draft prospect by MLB Pipeline, was 11-0 with a 1.25 ERA in 13 games.

Over 93 1/3 innings, Gray allowed 63 hits and 20 walks while striking out 105.

Video: Draft 2018: Reds draft RHP Josiah Gray No. 72

Richardson and Gray both converted to pitching from playing infield positions. Gray was a shortstop, while Richardson played mostly third base while dabbling in pitching. In less than a calendar year of full-time pitching, he was able to parlay it into a professional career.

"It's a big jump for me. I tried my best to perform this year and I set my goals high, and I pretty much accomplished them the way I wanted," Richardson said.

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds

Reds have more wiggle room with 2018 Draft

Addition of Minor League team means club can sign more players
MLB.com

DENVER -- Getting selections near the very top of the first round of the MLB Draft the past couple of years has enabled the Reds to zero in on taking not just the player available, but the best player they wanted without seeing him go off their board to another organization.

After picking No. 2 overall the past two years, the Reds will pick fifth in the 2018 MLB Draft.

DENVER -- Getting selections near the very top of the first round of the MLB Draft the past couple of years has enabled the Reds to zero in on taking not just the player available, but the best player they wanted without seeing him go off their board to another organization.

After picking No. 2 overall the past two years, the Reds will pick fifth in the 2018 MLB Draft.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

"You wish we were picking lower," senior director of amateur scouting Chris Buckley said. "That means our big league team had played a little better. But you have a better idea about who you are scouting."

The 2018 Draft will take place today through Wednesday, beginning with the Draft preview show on MLB Network and MLB.com at 6 p.m. ET today. MLB Network will broadcast the first 43 picks (Round 1 and Competitive Balance Round A), while MLB.com will stream all 78 picks on Day 1. MLB.com will also provide live pick-by-pick coverage of Rounds 3-10 on Day 2, with a preview show beginning at 12:30 p.m. ET. Then, Rounds 11-40 can be heard live on MLB.com on Day 3, beginning at noon ET.

Go to MLB.com/Draft to see the Top 200 Prospects list, projected top picks from MLB Pipeline analysts Jim Callis and Jonathan Mayo, the complete order of selection and more. And follow @MLBDraft on Twitter to see what Draft hopefuls, clubs and experts are saying.

Here's how the Draft is shaping up for the Reds.

In about 50 words
As the Reds endure a frustrating season when they thought their rebuild was nearing the end, the organization can especially ill-afford any first-round misses. Some of their recent picks -- taken later in the first round -- such as pitchers Nick Howard and Nick Travieso haven't materialized, mostly because of injuries.

"You try hard to hit on all of them," Buckley said.

The scoop
This is Buckley's 13th year of leading the Reds' scouting heading into the Draft. He also oversees the signing of the players once they are selected. That could be made easier this year with the addition of a third Rookie-level team in Greeneville, Tenn. The decision to add another player development team was pushed by the late Kevin Towers, along with president of baseball operations Dick Williams and senior advisor Walt Jocketty.

Video: Mayo breaks down Top 200 Draft prospects

"What that means is we'll be able to sign probably 15-18 more players from the Draft," Buckley said. "Just through numbers, that helps. Many of your bigger, more financially strong teams all have three rookie level teams. It's always hard to tell a scout that we don't have a spot to play the kid, somebody who wanted to sign a player. Now that won't occur again. That's a real commitment from ownership and the front office."

First-round buzz
The Reds, of course, will be somewhat at the mercy of the four clubs picking before them. But they have scouted all of the top Draft prospects and have been connected to Georgia Tech catcher Joey Bart and University of Florida right-handed pitcher Brady Singer. Callis predicted both players will be taken before Cincinnati, which could have the club taking second baseman Nick Madrigal from Oregon State, who is considered the best hitter in the Draft. The Reds have also scouted Glendale, Ariz., prep lefty pitcher Matthew Liberatore and University of Florida catcher Jonathan India.

Video: Draft Report: Nick Madrigal, College 2B/SS

Money matters
Under the Collective Bargaining Agreement, each team has an allotted bonus pool equal to the sum of the values of that club's selections in the first 10 rounds of the Draft. The more picks a team has, and the earlier it picks, the larger the pool. The signing bonuses for a team's selections in the first 10 rounds, plus any bonus greater than $125,000 for a player taken after the 10th round, will apply toward the bonus-pool total.

Any team going up to five percent over its allotted pool will be taxed at a 75-percent rate on the overage. A team that overspends by 5-10 percent gets a 75-percent tax plus the loss of a first-round pick. A team that goes 10-15 percent over its pool amount will be hit with a 100-percent penalty on the overage and the loss of a first- and second-round pick. Any overage of 15 percent or more gets a 100-percent tax plus the loss of first-round picks in the next two Drafts.

This year, the Reds have a pool of $10,900,400 to spend in the first 10 rounds, including $5,946,400 to spend on their first-round selection.

Shopping list
The Reds came into this season with the eighth-best farm system in baseball according to MLB.com. Under Buckley, the organization has always taken the best available player on its board, regardless of the round and position of the player. Of course, finding as many polished pitchers as possible would be viewed as a priority.

Trend watch
In recent years, the Reds have leaned toward selecting college players because the signing bonus demands are usually less than that of high school prospects who have college as an alternative to turning professional. development time is also shorter for most college prospects. However, the Reds only took slightly more college players in the 2017 Draft: 23 of their 41 picks were from the collegiate ranks.

Rising fast
Outfielder Taylor Trammell, the 35th overall pick taken in the Competitive Balance A round in 2016, is already the No. 3 ranked prospect in the organization and No. 39 in baseball, according to MLBPipeline. Trammell, 20, is currently with Class A Advanced Daytona and has a big league ETA of 2020.

Video: Top Prospects: Taylor Trammell, OF, Reds

Cinderella story
Shed Long, taken as a catcher in the 12th round in the 2013 Draft, is now a left-handed-hitting second baseman who could be in the big leagues later this season. Long, ranked No. 5 in the organization by MLBPipeline, didn't break out as a true prospect until '16 and has hit well at each level since. The 22-year-old is currently at Double-A Pensacola.

Video: Top Prospects: Shed Long, 2B, Reds

In the show
Of the players on the current 40-man roster, the following were taken by the Reds via the Draft: Homer Bailey (2004, first round), Tucker Barnhart (2009, 10th round), Alex Blandino (2014, first round), Phillip Ervin (2013, first round), Amir Garrett (2011, 22nd round), Billy Hamilton (2009, second round), Shed Long (2013, 12th round), Jose Lopez (2014, sixth round), Michael Lorenzen (2013, round 1A), Tyler Mahle (2013, seventh round), Tanner Rainey (2015, Comp. Balance Round B), Sal Romano (2011, 23rd round), Jackson Stephens (2012, 18th round), Robert Stephenson (2011, first round), Joey Votto (2002, second round), Zack Weiss (2013, sixth round), Jesse Winker (2012, round 1A).

Recent top picks
2017: Hunter Greene, RHP, Class A Dayton
2016: Nick Senzel, 3B/2B, Triple-A Louisville
2015: Tyler Stephenson, C, Class A Advanced Daytona
2014: Nick Howard, RHP, Class A Advanced Daytona
2013: Phillip Ervin, OF, Triple-A Louisville

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds

Lorenzen aces first test in tight spot vs. Bucs

Top prospect Senzel fielding, taking BP without issue after bout with vertigo
MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Reds reliever Michael Lorenzen couldn't wait to pitch again in a high-leverage game situation and was pumped about making his season debut on Wednesday night against the Pirates. Lorenzen had been on the disabled list since mid-March with a strained teres major muscle near his right shoulder.

In what ended up as a 5-4 loss for Cincinnati in 12 innings, Lorenzen came on to pitch the top of the 10th inning of a 4-4 game. According to Statcast™, his fastball averaged 96 mph, but he was hitting as high as 98 mph on the radar gun. The right-hander notched two routine outs and nearly retired the first three batters he faced, getting ahead of Sean Rodriguez with a 1-2 count.

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CINCINNATI -- Reds reliever Michael Lorenzen couldn't wait to pitch again in a high-leverage game situation and was pumped about making his season debut on Wednesday night against the Pirates. Lorenzen had been on the disabled list since mid-March with a strained teres major muscle near his right shoulder.

In what ended up as a 5-4 loss for Cincinnati in 12 innings, Lorenzen came on to pitch the top of the 10th inning of a 4-4 game. According to Statcast™, his fastball averaged 96 mph, but he was hitting as high as 98 mph on the radar gun. The right-hander notched two routine outs and nearly retired the first three batters he faced, getting ahead of Sean Rodriguez with a 1-2 count.

View Full Game Coverage

"I was feeling pretty good, but then I tried to get too cool out there with a 1-2 count," Lorenzen said on Thursday morning. "I felt myself overthrow, got into a 3-2 count and it cost me like an extra 10 pitches rather than just putting him away."

Rodriguez drew a walk after looking at two fastballs and a slider for ball four. Josh Harrison followed by hitting a first-pitch slider for a single to put Lorenzen in a jam. But he got out of it with a David Freese groundout to second base.

"We'll learn from that one," Lorenzen said. "I know how much we're being used, so pitch efficiency is probably the most important. That will be an adjustment I'll make."

In the bottom of the 10th with two outs and a runner on first base, interim manager Jim Riggleman lifted Lorenzen for pinch-hitter Tony Cruz -- the last man on his bench. Lorenzen, who has two career home runs, would normally be allowed to hit for himself in that situation.

"I've been taking batting practice about every day in the Minor Leagues," Lorenzen said. "I feel good. I think they just wanted to get the first one out of the way. I understand that, but now that I've gotten my first one out of the way, [Riggleman] is going to be more open to use me however he needs to."

Lorenzen slugged a pinch-hit home run for the Reds on April 6, 2017, vs. the Phillies, that snapped a tie and led to a win. He loves getting to bat.

"I've begged them to do that," Lorenzen said.

Rainey remains cool, throws heat

In his big league debut for the Reds on April 10 at Philadelphia, reliever Tanner Rainey allowed four runs when he gave up a grand slam to Scott Kingery. Rainey gave up three runs, three hits and three walks in his second game two days later against the Cardinals before he was sent back to Triple-A Louisville.

Rainey was recalled Wednesday and pitched in a tight jam against the Pirates. After Homer Bailey left in the sixth inning with two runners on, Rainey walked his first batter, Harrison, but struck out Gregory Polanco and Francisco Cervelli and got a grounder to the mound from Josh Bell.

Video: PIT@CIN: Rainey gets out of huge jam in the 6th

"As to why that was different than the first time, maybe a little less jitters," Riggleman said on Thursday. "He probably had some jitters last night, but a little less than the first time."

Rainey's fastball averaged 98.7 mph and twice topped out at 99.5 mph, according to Statcast™. He also featured a very nasty 91-mph slider.

"Last night, I thought after getting behind in the count he collected himself, challenged hitters and threw strikes," Riggleman said. "He had a really devastating slider to put hitters away with."

Senzel update

Reds top prospect Nick Senzel, who is working way back from dealing with vertigo, has been at the team's player development complex in Goodyear, Ariz. Senzel, ranked No. 1 in the Reds system and No. 6 overall by MLBPipeline, has been taking groundballs and batting practice without issue. At some point, when cleared, Senzel will play in games at extended spring camp.

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds, Michael Lorenzen

NL Central prospects who are this close to callup

MLB.com

The big stage hasn't bothered Pirates prospect Austin Meadows. Nor have the bright lights. And take it from Pittsburgh's rookie center fielder: Compared to Triple-A, they really do shine in the big leagues.

"The lights are brighter," Meadows said Tuesday after hitting his second homer in his fourth Major League game. "You can see the ball a lot better."

The big stage hasn't bothered Pirates prospect Austin Meadows. Nor have the bright lights. And take it from Pittsburgh's rookie center fielder: Compared to Triple-A, they really do shine in the big leagues.

"The lights are brighter," Meadows said Tuesday after hitting his second homer in his fourth Major League game. "You can see the ball a lot better."

Meadows was being sincere. Called up on Friday, the Pirates' No. 2 prospect said part of his production was due to the brighter lights in big league ballparks allowing him to better see pitches. Whatever the reason, Meadows' early success has helped the Bucs withstand Starling Marte's oblique strain.

Video: SD@PIT: Meadows tallies 3 hits, 1st career HR

Pitching prospect Nick Kingham also made an immediate impact for Pittsburgh, and Freddy Peralta did the same for the Brewers. There's help down on the farm in the National League Central, though clubs can only hope for debuts as electrifying as those put together by Meadows, Kingham and Peralta.

Here are five NL Central prospects to watch, one from each team. Like Meadows, they could soon find themselves playing under the bright lights of the big leagues.

Video: Top Prospects: Adbert Alzolay, RHP, Cubs

CUBS
Prospect:
Adbert Alzolay, RHP
MLB Pipeline rank: No. 1 (Cubs)
Why you should keep an eye on him: The Cubs have had success developing position players, but not pitchers. Alzolay could change that. The right-hander isn't far away, either, as he was considered to start in a doubleheader against the Reds on Saturday. Alzolay has had two dominating starts this season, including his Triple-A Iowa debut on April 20, when he held Nashville to two hits over six innings and struck out six. On April 30, Alzolay limited Omaha to one hit over seven scoreless innings, again striking out six. He's still working on his changeup, but he has the makeup that the Cubs love.
ETA: September, if not sooner

Video: Sheldon, Graves discuss Nick Senzel's health status

REDS
Prospect:
Nick Senzel, INF
MLB Pipeline rank: No. 1 (Reds), No. 6 (MLB)
Why you should keep an eye on him: The second overall pick in the 2016 Draft will be knocking on the door when he gets back on the field. Senzel began the season with Triple-A Louisville, posting a .271/.351/.459 slash line with three home runs in 22 games before he was placed on the disabled list due to vertigo. Senzel is currently taking batting practice and fielding grounders in Arizona, hoping to return to game action soon in extended spring camp. But there should be room for Senzel in Cincinnati's infield by the end of the year, as the 22-year-old can play either second or third base.
ETA: Later this season

Video: CHC@MIL: Burnes caps off impressive frame with a K

BREWERS
Prospect:
Corbin Burnes, RHP
MLB Pipeline rank: No. 2 (Brewers), No. 63 (MLB)
Why you should keep an eye on him: The Brewers already showed a willingness to call upon a prospect in a time of need when they promoted Peralta, their No. 9 prospect, for a pair of starts this month. Peralta happened to be on schedule when the big club needed an arm, but it could have just as easily been Burnes, the 23-year-old former fourth-round Draft pick who commands four pitches. He finished second in all of Minor League Baseball last season and led the Brewers' system with a 1.67 ERA at Double-A Biloxi, and while his Triple-A numbers in 2018 (1-2, 4.82 ERA in nine starts) don't jump off the page, one has to look past the thin air of Colorado Springs. In his first five road starts this season, Burnes had a 2.70 ERA and 37 strikeouts versus eight walks in 30 innings. "I want to know why this guy is not in the big leagues," one rival team's radio announcer said during a Burnes gem earlier this year.
ETA: Sometime this season

Video: BOS@PIT: Keller fans three over two scoreless innings

PIRATES
Prospect:
Mitch Keller, RHP
MLB Pipeline rank: No. 1 (Pirates), No. 14 (MLB)
Why you should keep an eye on him: Last year, Keller surpassed Meadows as the top-rated prospect in Pittsburgh's system -- and for good reason. Keller is one of baseball's most advanced pitching prospects, even if he's not yet a finished product. The 22-year-old right-hander, who was a second-round Draft pick in 2014, is 5-2 with a 3.02 ERA and 44 strikeouts in 47 2/3 innings over eight starts for Double-A Altoona. Keller's smooth, easy delivery pumps out fastballs that can touch 97-98 mph. His curveball is a plus pitch, and his changeup has improved over the past year. With a little more development time to sharpen his command and offspeed stuff, Keller has a chance to follow Gerrit Cole and Jameson Taillon on the road from top pitching prospect to top-of-the-rotation starter for the Bucs.
ETA: Possibly September, but more likely 2019

Video: KC@STL: Reyes nearing a return to Cardinals' rotation

CARDINALS
Prospect:
Alex Reyes, RHP
MLB Pipeline rank: No. 1 (Cardinals), No. 17 (MLB)
Why you should keep an eye on him: Reyes is set to join the Cardinals on Monday, and he could start as soon as the next day against the Brewers. By then, Reyes will be more than 15 months removed from the Tommy John surgery that stalled his ascent. But the 23-year-old has flashed the same electrifying stuff in three rehab starts, mostly recently striking out 12 over 7 2/3 innings for Double-A Springfield. The Cards just revealed that Reyes would return as a starter. The challenge facing the Cardinals, however, is managing Reyes' innings. They want him to work more than his previous career high of 110 so that he's prepared for next season, but the club can't risk further injury by pushing him too far. If the Cards want to restrict his workload, they could use his triple-digit fastball, swing-and-miss curveball and plus changeup in a relief role.
ETA: Next week

Adam Berry has covered the Pirates for MLB.com since 2015. Follow him on Twitter and Facebook and read his blog.

Milwaukee Brewers, Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, Alex Reyes

Senzel ramps up activity in vertigo rehab

Suarez scratched from Wednesday's lineup with sore ankle
MLB.com

SAN FRANCISCO -- Reds top prospect Nick Senzel's treatment for vertigo has gone well enough lately that the infielder has been able to resume baseball activity. Senzel is headed to the team's player development complex in Goodyear, Ariz.

"There's been improvement, enough to go to Arizona and keep progressing," Reds president of baseball operations Dick Williams said. "He'll do a little more baseball activity -- ground balls, running and eventually get into some games."

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SAN FRANCISCO -- Reds top prospect Nick Senzel's treatment for vertigo has gone well enough lately that the infielder has been able to resume baseball activity. Senzel is headed to the team's player development complex in Goodyear, Ariz.

"There's been improvement, enough to go to Arizona and keep progressing," Reds president of baseball operations Dick Williams said. "He'll do a little more baseball activity -- ground balls, running and eventually get into some games."

View Full Game Coverage

Senzel, who is ranked as the organization's No. 1 prospect by MLB Pipeline and No. 6 overall, was placed on Triple-A Louisville's 7-day disabled list on May 9. The 22-year-old hasn't played since May 3, when he made one plate appearance before he was removed from the game feeling dizzy.

Watch: MiLB Video

The second overall pick in the 2016 MLB Draft, Senzel is batting .271/.351/.459 in 22 games with three home runs and seven RBIs for Louisville this season while playing second base and third base.

Near the end of last season with Double-A Pensacola, Senzel also missed games with vertigo, a condition that causes loss of balance and dizzy spells.

When Senzel does start playing games, it will be in Arizona with players at extended spring camp.

"He'll start there because those games are more controlled," Williams said. "After he does that, then he can go back to Louisville."

Suarez scratched with sore ankle

On the original Reds lineup for Wednesday, third baseman Eugenio Suarez was listed on interim manager Jim Riggleman's card. But around three hours before first pitch, Suarez was scratched with a sore right ankle. Alex Blandino started at third base vs. the Giants.

During the first inning of Tuesday's 5-3 loss to San Francisco, Suarez jammed his ankle into second base as he tried to go back while running on a Scooter Gennett single. He was looked over by the trainer, was able to stay in the game and hit a two-run home run in the third inning.

Video: CIN@SF: Suarez smashes a 2-run homer in the 3rd

"When we got out there, he was having a hard time getting to be pain free for a couple of minutes. He turned it pretty good," Riggleman said.

Worth noting

Lefty pitcher Brandon Finnegan, who was demoted to Louisville on Friday to make room in the rotation for