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The Draft that helped Red Sox build WS roster

Four of Boston's postseason players drafted in 2011, another from class traded for Kinsler
MLB.com

The 2010 Draft had concluded just a few days before, but area scout Danny Watkins had already moved on to finding players for the following year. Watkins -- who covered Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee for the Red Sox and still does -- made his annual trip to the Tennessee Baseball Coaches Association's showcase for rising high school seniors in Murfreesboro, Tenn.

"There are 100-120 kids there from all across the state, and after a while, you get kind of numb, because you're watching the same thing over and over," Watkins said. "I always tell the kids, 'Do something to make me remember you.'"

The 2010 Draft had concluded just a few days before, but area scout Danny Watkins had already moved on to finding players for the following year. Watkins -- who covered Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee for the Red Sox and still does -- made his annual trip to the Tennessee Baseball Coaches Association's showcase for rising high school seniors in Murfreesboro, Tenn.

"There are 100-120 kids there from all across the state, and after a while, you get kind of numb, because you're watching the same thing over and over," Watkins said. "I always tell the kids, 'Do something to make me remember you.'"

This time around, an infielder did just that for Watkins.

:: World Series schedule and results ::

"He was playing shortstop, and he went behind the bag, extended his glove and then flipped the ball behind his back and made a perfect feed to second base. At that point, I said to myself, 'OK, let's see what else you can do.'"

"He" was an unheralded 5-foot-10, 160-pound shortstop from Overton High School in Nashville, Tenn., who could do a lot of things, including winning district MVP honors as a point guard in basketball and recognition as the Tennessee state boys bowler of the year. His name was Mookie Betts.

The Red Sox had maybe the best Draft of the decade in 2011, in large part -- but not solely -- because of Betts. They found four members of their current World Series roster, used another prospect to trade for a fifth and would have been reunited with another of their draftees had the Brewers advanced to the Fall Classic.

No one, not even the Red Sox, envisioned that Betts would develop into a power-hitting outfielder, one of the best all-around players in baseball and the presumptive American League MVP Award winner this year. Most of the industry viewed him as a good athlete but undersized and possessing solid but not standout tools. There wasn't a lot of heat on him -- the Royals may have been the biggest threat -- so Boston waited until its eighth choice to take Betts, in the fifth round at No. 172 overall.

Video: WS2018 Gm2: Betts doubles, singles twice vs. Dodgers

"Honestly, I found myself that spring looking for reasons to go see him," Watkins said. "I was drawn to him. I turned him in as a future shortstop who would hit .270 with 12 home runs. To say I saw 30 home runs and a Gold Glove right fielder, I wish I could tell you that, but I did not."

Looking back, then-Red Sox scouting director Amiel Sawdaye can't defend waiting until the fifth round to grab Betts. His signability was a bit of a question, but Boston was more aggressive in the Draft than any contender in the years before bonus pools and would lure him away from a Tennessee commitment for $750,000. Though Betts wasn't in the running for the Red Sox's two first-round picks or two supplemental first-rounders, they rated him as a second-round talent yet still opted for New York high school outfielder Williams Jerez (second round), Georgia prep catcher Jordan Weems (third) and Cal State Fullerton right-hander Noe Ramirez (fourth) before taking him.

"Mookie was a lesson," said Sawdaye, now senior vice president and assistant GM for the Diamondbacks. "We got him, but we waited until the fifth round on a guy that everyone graded as an excellent athlete, excellent instincts, plus hitter, plus runner. The only thing lacking in our reports was power.

"But if you're telling me we're getting a plus defender in the middle of the field, shortstop or second base, who's a plus hitter, plus approach, plus runner with excellent instincts, how did we wait that long? If we lose that player with those reports and that much conviction on him, that's a huge mistake."

Fortunately for the Red Sox, they didn't make a mistake on Betts, who made their 2011 Draft a terrific one. Without him, it still would have been a good Draft, as three of their top four picks are contributors to varying degrees on their World Series club, and it also produced a slugger who blossomed after a trade.

Heading into 2011, Boston didn't think Jackie Bradley Jr. would even last until its first pick at No. 19 overall. He was the reigning College World Series MVP, and the scouting reports on him still ring true today: outstanding defensive center fielder, productive if streaky hitter. Up-the-middle players who have starred at college baseball's highest level usually are top-10 selections.

Video: Draft 2011: Bradley the The Red Sox's No. 40 pick

But Bradley missed half of the regular season with a left wrist injury, tried to do too much when he returned and had trouble adjusting to the new college bats, which had been toned down severely after NCAA rule changes. Though the Gamecocks repeated as national champions, he hit just .247 with six homers and slid all the way out of the first round to the Red Sox at No. 40. They pounced and signed the future All-Star and 2018 AL Championship Series MVP for an over-slot $1.1 million.

"When we put together our list at the beginning of the year, he was in our top five," said Mike Rikard, then Boston's national crosschecker and now its scouting director. "When the Draft came, he had struggled and gotten banged up, and people pumped the brakes a little.

Video: Bradley delivers clutch hits for Sox, wins ALCS MVP

"When a guy gets hurt, it's always tough, but a few of our scouts still saw an All-Star-caliber player. The majority of our room saw a solid-type player. His defensive grades were through the roof and we knew he was a good hitter, but no one was quite sure how much power he'd have. He's probably the one who ended up closer to his projections as any of them."

Both of the Red Sox's 2011 first-round picks haven't quite matched their Draft-day expectations, but they still found roles on their big league team. Right-hander Matt Barnes, who signed for $1.5 million as the 19th overall choice after starring at Connecticut as well as in the Cape Cod League and Team USA, projected as a mid-rotation starter at the time, but lacked consistency with his secondary pitches in the upper Minors. His curveball became a weapon once he became a full-time reliever, however, and he has delivered a 1.23 ERA in seven postseason appearances and a win in Game 1 of the World Series this fall.

Video: Draft 2011: Barnes goes to Red Sox with the 19th pick

Injuries and a shortage of opportunities have limited Blake Swihart's ability to show what he can do in the Majors, but scouts inside and outside the organization still think he can be a quality player if he stays healthy and gets at-bats. When the Red Sox signed him for $2.5 million as the No. 26 overall pick, the New Mexico high school catcher had tools reminiscent of a young Buster Posey. Swihart has started at six positions and played seven this year.

Interestingly, there was a time when the fourth player that Boston selected before the second round rated as the best prospect of the bunch and one of the top lefty pitching prospects in baseball. California high schooler Henry Owens signed for $1.55 million at No. 36 and cruised all the way through Triple-A thanks to a tantalizing changeup and deceptive fastball. But his lack of a reliable curveball or command prevented him from gaining a foothold during four stints with the Red Sox, and his control totally fell apart in 2017 before they waived him that December.

Jerez, who converted to pitching in 2014, and Ramirez also have made the Majors. Boston lost Ramirez on waivers to the Angels in August 2017 and traded Jerez to them this July as part of a package for Ian Kinsler, a fifth member of the World Series roster.

Two players in the Draft got away from the Red Sox. Eighth-rounder Senquez Golson, a tooled-up prep outfielder from Mississippi, turned down $1 million to play football and baseball at Mississippi and eventually became a second-round pick of the Pittsburgh Steelers (though he has yet to play in an NFL game). Boston did land Kent State third baseman Travis Shaw for $110,000 in the ninth round, and while never considered a top prospect, he did hit 29 homers and provided better defense than expected in 2015-16 for the Sox. But the Red Sox shipped him to the Brewers in an ill-fated deal for Tyler Thornburg, and he has since slammed 63 homers over the past two years and even played a credible second base.

Despite missing out on an athlete it coveted and giving away Shaw too early, Boston still had a memorable Draft. It still has a ways to go to become the franchise's most productive ever, because the Red Sox had two of the best in baseball history in 1983 (Roger Clemens, Ellis Burks) and '76 (Wade Boggs, Bruce Hurst, John Tudor). But the 2011 crop is on the verge of delivering something those two couldn't -- a World Series championship.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

Boston Red Sox

Another young 3B stud among Red Sox in AFL

MLB.com

The Red Sox's surplus of talent at third base continues to grow.

Rafael Devers was one of the top offensive prospects in baseball when he reached Boston at age 20 last year. While he had an up-and-down 2018, he mashed in the American League Championship Series. Former first-round pick Michael Chavis has established himself as one of the game's best power prospects and has reached Triple-A.

The Red Sox's surplus of talent at third base continues to grow.

Rafael Devers was one of the top offensive prospects in baseball when he reached Boston at age 20 last year. While he had an up-and-down 2018, he mashed in the American League Championship Series. Former first-round pick Michael Chavis has established himself as one of the game's best power prospects and has reached Triple-A.

Coming up fast behind those two is Bobby Dalbec, who rebounded from an injury-marred 2017 season to bat .257/.361/.558 between Class A Advanced and Double-A while ranking second in the Minors with 70 extra-base hits and 109 RBIs and fourth with 32 homers. His power has stood out in in the Arizona Fall League as well, where he batted .259/.375/.481 with four extra-base hits (one homer) and nine RBIs in seven games during the first two weeks.

Arizona Fall League overviews for all 30 teams

A 2016 fourth-round pick out of Arizona, Dalbec, who is No. 6 on the Red Sox's Top 30 Prospects list, has shown why he has earned Kris Bryant comparisons now that he's no longer battling a hamate injury that compromised him during his first full pro season. He also has worked to tone down his approach, cutting down his strikeout rate from 37 percent in 2017 to 32 in '18, though whiffs will likely always be part of his game. He topped Fall League hitters with 14 strikeouts in the season's first two weeks.

The combination of Dalbec's strength, aggressiveness and the bat speed and loft in his right-handed-swing gives him the most raw power in the Red Sox system. It also means he doesn't need to try to hit home runs, because they should come naturally. He said continuing to refine his plate discipline is one of his goals while he's with the Mesa Solar Sox.

"I think I matured a lot at the plate, just not trying to do too much, not trying to sell out," Dalbec said. "While I still do that sometimes, it's just the kind of hitter I am, but I'm working on being more consistent and sticking to the approach.

"Even the first couple games here, sometimes you forget that you don't need to swing that hard, especially for me. So it's fun just being able to get better at that, to kind of focus on that. It's a struggle sometimes, but when it's going, it feels really good."

Dalbec also improved defensively this season. His strong arm never has been a question -- he led all NCAA Division I pitchers with 41 strikeouts during the 2016 NCAA Tournament and yielded only two earned runs in three College World Series starts as the Wildcats finished second -- but his range had been ordinary and he lacked consistency. While he's known most for his prodigious power, he also takes pride in his glovework, another point of emphasis for him during his time in the AFL.

"Defense is super fun to me, just working on it and getting better and cleaner and smoother.," Dalbec said. "I get knocked a lot, people say I don't have any range or I'm an average glove and just an arm, but I'm trying to be one of the better third basemen."

Boston's logjam of hot-corner prospects doesn't stop with Dalbec. The Red Sox signed Danny Diaz for $1.6 million out of Venezuela in 2017 and added Nick Northcut (11th round) and Brandon Howlett (21st) via the Draft in June.

Red Sox hitters in the Fall League

Michael Chavis, 3B/1B -- The Red Sox hoped to get their top prospect some more at-bats after he was suspended for the first 80 games of 2018 for testing positive for a performance-enhancing substance, but a sore wrist upended those plans, as Chavis never suited up for Mesa and was removed from the Solar Sox roster on Wednesday. The 2014 first-rounder from Georgia batted .298/.391/.538 with nine homers in 46 games (mostly in Double-A) this year but will not get a chance to win a second AFL championship after helping the Peoria Javelinas to the title last fall.

Josh Ockimey, 1B -- A 2014 fifth-rounder as a Philadelphia prepster, Ockimey offers one of the best combinations of power and patience in the system. He hit .245/.356/.455 with 20 homers and 70 walks between Double-A and Triple-A.

Esteban Quiroz, 2B -- The Red Sox purchased Quiroz, who started on Mexico's World Baseball Classic team in 2017, from the Mexican League's Yucatan Lions last November. An offensive-minded utility man, he batted .283/.406/.547 with seven homers in 32 games (mostly in Double-A), missing much of the season after getting a sports hernia repaired.

Red Sox pitchers in the Fall League

Darwinzon Hernandez, LHP -- Signed for a bargain $7,500 out of Venezuela in 2013, Hernandez can reach the upper 90s with late life on his fastball and overpower hitters with his hard slider. He had a 3.53 ERA with 134 strikeouts in 107 innings, mostly in Class A Advanced.

Mike Shawaryn, RHP -- Shawaryn has cruised through the Minors since signing as a fifth-rounder out of Maryland in 2016, relying on a nifty slider/cutter and complementing it with a low-90s fastball that runs and sinks. He logged a 3.44 ERA with 132 strikeouts in 149 1/3 innings between Double-A and Triple-A.

Teddy Stankiewicz, RHP -- A 2013 second-rounder from Seminole State (Okla.) Junior College, Stankiewicz sits in the low 90s with his fastball and employs a splitter as his best secondary pitch. He compiled a 4.97 ERA with a 115/42 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 150 1/3 innings, mostly in Double-A. Stankiewicz pitched just one game in the Fall League, on Oct. 10, allowing three runs on four hits in two innings, and was removed from Mesa's roster on Wednesday.

Josh Taylor, LHP -- The Phillies signed Taylor as an undrafted free agent out of Georgia College and State in 2014 and traded him a year later to acquire international bonus pool money from the D-backs, who shipped him to Boston for Deven Marrero this May. He pitched in the AFL with Salt River in 2016 and works off a 93-97 mph fastball and a hard slider. He posted a 3.35 ERA with 60 strikeouts in 53 2/3 relief innings while progressing from Class A Advanced to Triple-A.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.

Boston Red Sox

Pipeline names Red Sox Prospects of the Year

MLB.com

BOSTON -- In the midst of their latest playoff run, the Red Sox are fortunate to have plenty of homegrown talent that helped account for a 108-win season, the best in club history.

On the farm, there are others who envision being part of future Octobers.

BOSTON -- In the midst of their latest playoff run, the Red Sox are fortunate to have plenty of homegrown talent that helped account for a 108-win season, the best in club history.

On the farm, there are others who envision being part of future Octobers.

Right-handed hitting Bobby Dalbec, in particular, is a candidate to one day be taking aim at the Green Monster in the not-too-distant future.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

MLB Pipeline has awarded Dalbec as the Hitting Prospect of the Year for the Red Sox. Right-hander Denyi Reyes, who you haven't heard quite as much about yet, is the Pitching Prospect of the Year.

Each team's Hitting and Pitching Prospects of the Year were chosen by the MLB Pipeline staff. To receive consideration, players must have spent at least half the year in the Minors and appeared on the team's Top 30 Prospects list.

It has already been a fruitful year of awards for Dalbec, who was recently tabbed the organization's hitter and defender of the year in the annual awards given out by the Red Sox. Since the Red Sox started giving out separate awards for offense and defense in 2005, Dalbec is the first player to win both.

"I think it took a special performance on both sides of the ball," said Red Sox director of player development Ben Crockett. "From an evaluative standpoint, from a numbers standpoint, he stood out in both areas pretty significantly."

Video: Top Prospects: Bobby Dalbec, 3B, Red Sox

In 129 games in the Minors this season, including the last 29 at Double-A Portland, the 23-year-old third baseman belted 32 homers and had 109 RBIs in 455 at-bats.

Dalbec takes particular pride in being recognized for his defense.

"I really worked hard on my defense in the offseason and in Spring Training, and it's something I take a lot of pride in. It feels very good to be acknowledged for that," said Dalbec.

It has been a fast rise for Dalbec, a fourth-round selection of the Red Sox out of Arizona in 2016.

Reyes was a find from the international scouting department and was signed by Boston in '14. The 6-4 righty specializes in location. The 21-year-old split his season between Class A affiliates Greenville and Salem, going 12-5 with a 1.97 ERA.

Ian Browne has covered the Red Sox for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @IanMBrowne and Facebook.

Boston Red Sox

Red Sox instructional league roster, schedule

MLB.com

At the end of each season, Major League clubs hold instructional league play, commonly known as instructs, an extended mini-camp that allows Minor Leaguers -- particularly those just starting their pro careers at the lower levels of their team's system -- to get some work in before calling it a year. Players work on specific parts of their game and get offseason workout plans while often playing a handful of games against nearby teams to provide low-key competition to put what they are working on into practice.

Here's a look at the Red Sox's roster, with the players' ranks in the team's Top 30 Prospects list in parentheses:

At the end of each season, Major League clubs hold instructional league play, commonly known as instructs, an extended mini-camp that allows Minor Leaguers -- particularly those just starting their pro careers at the lower levels of their team's system -- to get some work in before calling it a year. Players work on specific parts of their game and get offseason workout plans while often playing a handful of games against nearby teams to provide low-key competition to put what they are working on into practice.

Here's a look at the Red Sox's roster, with the players' ranks in the team's Top 30 Prospects list in parentheses:

Instructional league rosters

PITCHERS: Yoan Aybar; Eduard Bazardo; Brayan Bello; Durbin Feltman (No. 12); Tanner Houck (No. 5); Francisco Lopez-Soto; Chris Machamer; Joan Martinez; Alexander Montero; Andrew Politi; Aldo Ramirez; Roniel Raudes (No. 27); Yasel Santana; Zach Schellenger; Alex Scherff (No. 16); Chase Shugart; Miguel Suero; Josh Taylor; Thad Ward

CATCHERS: Jonathan Diaz; Roldani Baldwin (No. 23); Alan Marrero; Elih Marrero; Lane Milligan; Justin Qiangba

INFIELDERS: Jecorrah Arnold; Triston Casas (No. 3); Pedro Castellanos (No. 28); C.J. Chatham (No. 8); Andre Colon; Danny Diaz (No. 11); Ryan Fitzgerald; Antoni Flores (No. 14); Devlin Granberg; Brandon Howlett (No. 29); Everlouis Lozada; Brett Netzer (No. 25); Nicholas Northcut (No. 17); Esteban Quiroz; Ceddanne Rafaela; Kleiber Rodriguez

• Red Sox get belated look at top 2 picks at instructs

OUTFIELDERS: Juan Carlos Abreu; Trey Ball; Cole Brannen (No. 19); Marino Campana; Tyler Dearden; Nick Decker (No. 13); Jarren Duran; Tyler Esplin (No. 26); Gilberto Jimenez; Angel Maita; Bramdon Perez; Caleb Ramsey; Jagger Rusconi; Kervin Suarez

SCHEDULE
Fri.., Sept. 21 - vs. Baltimore
Mon., Sept. 24 - vs. Tampa Bay
Thur., Sept. 27 - @ Tampa Bay
Fri., Sept. 28 - vs. Team Germany
Mon., Oct. 1 - vs. Team Germany
Wed., Oct. 3 - @ Baltimore
Fri., Oct. 5 - vs. Baltimore
Mon., Oct. 8 - @ Baltimore
Tue., Oct. 9 - vs. Baltimore

Boston Red Sox

Sox send Chavis to AFL: 'He needs the at-bats'

Boston wants top prospect to make up for time lost due to 80-game suspension
MLB.com

CHICAGO -- Earlier this week Arizona Fall League rosters were announced, and the Red Sox will send six Minor Leaguers to the Mesa Solar Sox, headlined by top prospect Michael Chavis.

Chavis, the Red Sox's No. 1 prospect and No. 97 prospect in baseball per MLBPipeline, missed a majority of the season due to an 80-game suspension for a positive test for performance-enhancing drugs, but he collected 167 at-bats across three levels this season. The 2014 first-round Draft pick spent most of his time at Double-A Portland and was promoted to Triple-A on Aug. 24, hitting a combined .305/.389/.551 with nine home runs.

View Full Game Coverage

CHICAGO -- Earlier this week Arizona Fall League rosters were announced, and the Red Sox will send six Minor Leaguers to the Mesa Solar Sox, headlined by top prospect Michael Chavis.

Chavis, the Red Sox's No. 1 prospect and No. 97 prospect in baseball per MLBPipeline, missed a majority of the season due to an 80-game suspension for a positive test for performance-enhancing drugs, but he collected 167 at-bats across three levels this season. The 2014 first-round Draft pick spent most of his time at Double-A Portland and was promoted to Triple-A on Aug. 24, hitting a combined .305/.389/.551 with nine home runs.

View Full Game Coverage

Though Chavis is on the doorstep of the Major Leagues, the Red Sox want him to make up for missed time by participating in the AFL and Puerto Rican winter ball, manager Alex Cora said.

"He missed all those games, he needs the at-bats," Cora said. "He missed Spring Training, too -- he was hurt -- so it will be good for him to get more repetitions against some quality competition. It will help him with his development."

Video: Top Prospects: Michael Chavis, 3B, Red Sox

Chavis, a third baseman from Sprayberry High School in Marietta, Georgia, was suspended on April 6 after testing positive for Dehydrochlormethyltestosterone (DHMCT). He denied knowingly ingesting the substance at the time.

The Red Sox will also send No. 6 prospect, third baseman Bobby Dalbec, No. 7 prospect, left-handed pitcher Darwinzon Hernandez, No. 10 prospect, first baseman Josh Ockimey, right-handed pitcher Teddy Stankiewicz and left-handed pitcher Josh Taylor.

Sale could be an 'opener'
Cora had joked a few days ago that Chris Sale could return as an "opener" for a few starts to build up his strength in time for the playoffs, but that possibility is increasingly likely. The Rays popularized the idea of using an "opener," or a relief pitcher who pitches the first inning of games in lieu of a traditional starter.

Because Minor League regular seasons end Monday, Sale would not be able to participate in a rehab assignment. In order to make up for those innings, Sale could make a couple starts in which he only goes a few innings.

"He wants me to make sure I call him 'The Opener,'" Cora said Sunday. "We'll build him up little by little. I don't know if it's three [innings] in the first one, or whatever, but we'll talk about it. That's going to be the case."

Cora added that Sale will likely return to the rotation sometime during the next homestand against the Astros, Blue Jays and Mets.

Sale threw a bullpen session on Saturday and will throw another during the upcoming three-game series in Atlanta that begins Monday before the Red Sox decide his next course of action. The ace lefty is on the disabled list with left shoulder inflammation.

Max Gelman is a reporter for MLB.com based in Chicago.

Boston Red Sox

Sox have deal with No. 23 int'l prospect Lopez

MLB.com

The Red Sox came to terms with close to 70 international prospects during the 2017-2018 signing period, and this year, the club is once again a big player on the market.

According to industry sources, the Red Sox agreed to a $1.15 million deal with outfielder Eduardo Lopez of the Dominican Republic, ranked No. 23 on MLB.com's Top 30 International Prospects list. The Red Sox have not confirmed the deal.

The Red Sox came to terms with close to 70 international prospects during the 2017-2018 signing period, and this year, the club is once again a big player on the market.

According to industry sources, the Red Sox agreed to a $1.15 million deal with outfielder Eduardo Lopez of the Dominican Republic, ranked No. 23 on MLB.com's Top 30 International Prospects list. The Red Sox have not confirmed the deal.

:: 2018 International Signing Period ::

Lopez is viewed as a skilled prospect with emerging tools. He has shown improvement in his overall game and increased strength in the last several months.

A switch-hitting center fielder, Lopez might be a better overall hitter from the left side of the plate, but he has shown more power from the right side. He has shown flashes of power in games. On defense, he has shown good defensive actions with a playable arm.

According to the rules established by the Collective Bargaining Agreement, clubs that received a Competitive Balance Pick in Round B of the MLB Draft received a pool of $6,025,400, while clubs that received a Competitive Balance Pick in Round A of the Draft received $5,504,500. All other clubs, including the Red Sox, received $4,983,500.

Teams are allowed to trade as much of their international pool money as they would like, but can only acquire 75 percent of a team's initial pool amount. Additionally, signing bonuses of $10,000 or less do not count toward a club's bonus pool, and foreign professional players who are at least 25 and have played in a foreign league for at least six seasons are also exempt.

Jesse Sanchez, who has been writing for MLB.com since 2001, is a national reporter based in Phoenix. Follow him on Twitter @JesseSanchezMLB and Facebook.

Boston Red Sox

Casas takes swings at Fenway, chats with J.D.

'It makes me hungry to get back here,' says Boston's top Draft pick
Special to MLB.com

BOSTON -- Triston Casas' first steps onto the field at Fenway Park as a member of the Boston Red Sox organization fell in stride behind J.D. Martinez, though he was far from being overshadowed by the slugger.

Taken by the Red Sox with the 26th overall Draft selection earlier this month, the 18-year-old proved wise beyond his years by taking full advantage of his access to one of the Major League's best home run hitters this season.

View Full Game Coverage

BOSTON -- Triston Casas' first steps onto the field at Fenway Park as a member of the Boston Red Sox organization fell in stride behind J.D. Martinez, though he was far from being overshadowed by the slugger.

Taken by the Red Sox with the 26th overall Draft selection earlier this month, the 18-year-old proved wise beyond his years by taking full advantage of his access to one of the Major League's best home run hitters this season.

View Full Game Coverage

"He's not a bad guy to pick a brain about hitting and stuff," Casas said of talking with Martinez. "I was just talking to him about little things, what he thinks about and stuff, and just the way he approaches the game. He's performing at the highest level right now and he's a pretty good player at this level, so I was just trying to pick anything that I could. Any doubts that I had, I was just asking him about it."

Video: Draft 2018: Casas on being 26th overall pick

After settling the early nerves of hitting under a highly attentive crowd of onlookers, the 6-foot-4 left-handed hitter proved he too can provide some pop down the line for the big club, as he deposited two balls into the Red Sox bullpen in right and one off the wall in center field.

A product of American Heritage School in Plantation, Fla., Casas relished the experience and looks forward to more down the line.

"It's pretty amazing. The history here at this park and to imagine how many great players came through this dugout, and the other one, and stepped onto that field, is pretty amazing to think about," said Casas. "It was pretty fun. It's definitely [an experience] that I'll never forget. It makes me hungry to get back here."

Tweet from @RedSox: Not a bad guy to learn from. pic.twitter.com/fHkLLBnCpH

Initially committed to play at the University of Miami, the third baseman opted to begin his professional career and signed with Boston on June 14.

Video: Red Sox thrilled to add Casas, Decker to team

Assigned to the Rookie-level Gulf Coast Red Sox in Fort Myers, Fla., he made his debut on Friday night as the team's designated hitter, going 0-for-3 with two strikeouts.

With the ability to play home games at JetBlue Park, Casas has been afforded the opportunity to test his swing against similar dimensions to what he saw on Saturday in Boston.

"I like that it works with my swing," said Casas of Fenway. "My swing is one that's pretty uppercut towards left-center. Hopefully down in JetBlue, and eventually, hopefully here, I can work that wall pretty well. ... I like the way it fits my swing.

"It's truly amazing. ... I see myself growing well here and prospering as a baseball player and as a person."

Craig Forde is a contributor to MLB.com based in Boston.

Boston Red Sox

Red Sox sign first-round Draft pick Casas

Lefty-swinging third baseman was No. 26 overall selection
MLB.com

Triston Casas, the big left-handed slugger the Red Sox selected with the 26th overall pick in the Draft earlier this month, can now get to work.

Boston on Thursday finalized a contract with Casas to a full-slot deal worth $2,552,800.

View Full Game Coverage

Triston Casas, the big left-handed slugger the Red Sox selected with the 26th overall pick in the Draft earlier this month, can now get to work.

Boston on Thursday finalized a contract with Casas to a full-slot deal worth $2,552,800.

View Full Game Coverage

The night that Casas was selected by the Red Sox, he expressed excitement for what kind of fit it will be.

"I'm glad the way the board fell and I feel like Boston's a great fit for me, and I couldn't be happier with the way turned out, to be honest," said Casas.

The South Florida native became intrigued by Boston when the Red Sox had him in for a pre-Draft visit.

"It was a great experience, going to Boston. It was my first time in Boston and in Massachusetts, so I really enjoyed my time there," said Casas. "I really loved the city and I love the build of it and I love the way that Fenway fit right in the middle of it, just like another building."

Known for his opposite-field stroke, the 6-foot-4, 238-pound Casas could one day be a beast playing his home games at Fenway Park.

"The one thing that has always stuck out in Triston's case is his opposite-field power," said Red Sox director of amateur scouting Mike Rikard. "He can hit the ball to left-center as far as many other right-handed hitters can when they pull the ball. That's always been a big thing in scouting him. He's got a very professional approach. Although he is a power hitter, he does have a nice plan at the plate and he was able to make adjustments and just as important, he can use he can use the whole field very well for a young hitter."

Casas played third base during his stellar career at American Heritage (Fla.) High School, and is expected to start his professional career as a third baseman. He could move to first at some point, or go back and forth between the corners to increase his versatility.

The Red Sox also reached agreements with seven additional Draft selections: right-handed pitcher Durbin Feltman (third round, $559,600), outfielder Devlin Granberg (sixth round, $40,000), second baseman Jarren Duran (seventh round), left-handed pitcher Brian Brown (ninth round, $2,500), second baseman Grant Williams (10th round), right-handed pitcher Andrew Politi (15th round), and second baseman Jonathan Ortega (19th round).

Ian Browne has covered the Red Sox for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @IanMBrowne and Facebook.

Boston Red Sox

Red Sox replace Beeks with Haley

MLB.com

BOSTON -- The Red Sox on Friday selected right-handed pitcher Justin Haley to the active Major League roster from Triple-A Pawtucket. To make room on the 25-man roster, the club optioned left-handed pitcher Jalen Beeks to Pawtucket following last night's game against the Tigers.
 
Haley, who will wear number 65, has made 11 starts for Pawtucket this season, going 3-6 with a 3.18 ERA. The 26-year-old right-hander has a 2.45 ERA since May 1, having allowed two runs or fewer in each of his seven outings in that time. Selected by the Red Sox in the sixth round of the 2012 MLB Draft, he spent his first five professional seasons (2012-16) in the Boston organization. Haley made the Twins' 2017 Opening Day roster and appeared in 10 Major League games -- the first of his career -- before being returned to the Red Sox on July 24 in accordance with rules of the Rule 5 Draft. He spent the remainder of the season in Pawtucket and attended 2018 Spring Training with Boston as a non-roster invitee.
 
Beeks, 24, made his Major League debut last night against Detroit, earning the loss after giving up six runs in four innings. He is the No. 15-ranked prospect of the Red Sox, according to MLB Pipeline.

View Full Game Coverage

View Full Game Coverage BOSTON -- The Red Sox on Friday selected right-handed pitcher Justin Haley to the active Major League roster from Triple-A Pawtucket. To make room on the 25-man roster, the club optioned left-handed pitcher Jalen Beeks to Pawtucket following last night's game against the Tigers.
 
Haley, who will wear number 65, has made 11 starts for Pawtucket this season, going 3-6 with a 3.18 ERA. The 26-year-old right-hander has a 2.45 ERA since May 1, having allowed two runs or fewer in each of his seven outings in that time. Selected by the Red Sox in the sixth round of the 2012 MLB Draft, he spent his first five professional seasons (2012-16) in the Boston organization. Haley made the Twins' 2017 Opening Day roster and appeared in 10 Major League games -- the first of his career -- before being returned to the Red Sox on July 24 in accordance with rules of the Rule 5 Draft. He spent the remainder of the season in Pawtucket and attended 2018 Spring Training with Boston as a non-roster invitee.
 
Beeks, 24, made his Major League debut last night against Detroit, earning the loss after giving up six runs in four innings. He is the No. 15-ranked prospect of the Red Sox, according to MLB Pipeline.

Boston Red Sox, Jalen Beeks, Justin Haley

Beeks' debut dampened by quiet O, rocky 1st

Red Sox prospect weathers 5-run frame, but Boston scores just 2 to back him
MLB.com

BOSTON -- After falling into a five-run hole in the first inning against the Tigers, the Red Sox failed to convert scoring opportunities to mount a comeback and complete the series sweep, falling to Detroit, 7-2, on Thursday night at Fenway Park.

Jalen Beeks struggled on the mound in his first career start, allowing four hits, one walk and a home run in the first inning to put the Red Sox in a 5-0 hole they would not recover from.

View Full Game Coverage

BOSTON -- After falling into a five-run hole in the first inning against the Tigers, the Red Sox failed to convert scoring opportunities to mount a comeback and complete the series sweep, falling to Detroit, 7-2, on Thursday night at Fenway Park.

Jalen Beeks struggled on the mound in his first career start, allowing four hits, one walk and a home run in the first inning to put the Red Sox in a 5-0 hole they would not recover from.

View Full Game Coverage

Blake Swihart, who made his catching debut in the loss, caught Beeks when he played at Triple-A Pawtucket. He said he lamented waiting to get Beeks' off-speed pitches more involved in the mix.

"I haven't seen him in a few months," Swihart said. "So I was just trying to go out there and remember what I could remember with him with his fastball, cutter and play it off with that."

Beeks took a fastball-heavy approach to the first inning, but his pitches were too high, allowing the Tigers the opportunity to hammer hits early.

"In Pawtucket, I was pretty fastball-heavy, but I usually execute my fastball location better in the first inning," Beeks said. "But I was just missing pitches in the first."

Video: DET@BOS: Cora on Beeks' start in loss to Tigers

Andrew Benintendi responded to the Tigers' big inning immediately, blasting his first career leadoff home run over the bullpen to narrow the deficit to 5-1. It was Benintendi's 11th home run of the season, and his fourth in the past five games.

Video: DET@BOS: Benintendi blasts a leadoff homer

But Boston failed to build on his momentum. The Red Sox managed five hits, including a fifth-inning double by Blake Swihart, who later scored on an RBI groundout by Xander Bogaerts, but their efforts weren't enough to contest the Tigers' convincing lead.

Video: DET@BOS: Bogaerts plates Swihart in the 5th inning

"Obviously, not ideal," Beeks said. "But you've just got to learn from it, and that's what I'm going to do."

That's what he did as soon as the second inning. Despite faltering in the first inning, Beeks, Boston's No. 15 prospect according to MLB Pipeline, grew more comfortable as the game progressed, allowing three hits, one run and two walks over his last three innings.

"I think spin rate and his fastball will play at this level, but you have to mix it up, you have to slow them down a little bit so the fastball plays up in the zone," Red Sox manager Alex Cora said. "Right away it did, with [JaCoby] Jones and even with [Nicholas] Castellanos. That ball obviously here is a double, but there were some pitches you could see that they were able to get to those pitches ... because we weren't using off-speed pitches earlier. We didn't show it to them. As soon as he starts showing it ... then the swings weren't as aggressive as in the first inning."

Video: DET@BOS: Beeks gets out of big jam in the 2nd

Beeks said he spoke with the coaches about mixing up his pitches more -- turning to his curveball and changeup to throw off batters. And as he made those adjustments, he began to have some success on the mound.

He retired five consecutive batters to end his first career start with four strikeouts, seven hits, six runs and three walks in four innings.

Beeks left the Red Sox's clubhouse with an unmarked black cap over his eyes, out of the spotlight as quickly as he entered it. The Red Sox will option Beeks to Pawtucket, but Cora said the start was a valuable learning experience in Beeks' growth as a pitcher.

"It wasn't the start that he wanted, or we wanted from him," Cora said. "I think it's going to help him out. for him to keep developing at this level, we've been talking throughout the season, it's very important to mix up your pitches and he learned that in the first inning and after that, he was OK, so like I told him, he competed. After that first inning, he kept going, he kept attacking and he made some adjustments, so we're proud of the way he competed today."

Relievers Brian Johnson and Hector Velazquez held the Tigers to one run over the final five innings. But the Red Sox still could not connect, despite stringing together two hits in the eighth inning.

Red Sox slugger J.D. Martinez didn't play the final two innings due to discomfort in his back. Martinez exited Sunday's game in Houston with back spasms and started the next game. Cora said the discomfort was not as severe this time.

"He felt a little bit tight and at the point of the game, though I felt we still had a shot, one swing away to get back into the game, stay away from him and hopefully he'll be back tomorrow," Cora said. "Not as bad as in Houston but still, I kind of I felt like it was a smart move tonight."

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Double play costs Red Sox scoring opportunity:
With the bases loaded and red-hot Benintendi at the plate in the bottom of the second inning, it looked like the Red Sox had a chance to close the 5-1 gap with the Tigers. But Benintendi grounded to shortstop Jose Iglesias, who quickly converted the double play. The Red Sox stranded nine on base in the game.

Video: DET@BOS: Boyd escapes bases-loaded jam in the 2nd

SOUND SMART
The five-run first inning marked the most runs the Red Sox have allowed in the opening frame since a five-run first against the Brewers on May 9, 2017. It also marked the third time this season Boston allowed five or more runs in a single inning.

HE SAID IT
"I felt good back there, you know, blocking, receiving everything. There's always some fine-tuning stuff to do, and the more I work on it, the more I get out there, the better it's going to be." -- Swihart, on his catching debut

UP NEXT
Chris Sale will take the mound on Friday to face his former team, the White Sox, where he spent seven seasons. He was 74-50 with a 3.00 ERA in 228 career appearances with the White Sox. Sale enters the matchup 5-3 with a 3.00 ERA and .98 WHIP. Against the White Sox last year, Sale struck out nine but departed after five innings, nine hits and six runs. The White Sox will counter with Dylan Covey (1-1, 2.82). First pitch is set for 7:10 p.m. ET.

Blake Richardson is a reporter for MLB.com based in Boston.

Boston Red Sox, Jalen Beeks

Red Sox look beyond age in Draft mix

MLB.com

BOSTON -- For the second straight year, the Red Sox ended the MLB Draft with plenty of pitching draftees.

Draft Tracker: See every Red Sox Draft pick

BOSTON -- For the second straight year, the Red Sox ended the MLB Draft with plenty of pitching draftees.

Draft Tracker: See every Red Sox Draft pick

Vice president of amateur scouting Mike Rikard said Thursday before the Draft that the Red Sox would focus on finding talent before filling holes in the roster. He also said that if the talent was there, drafting a high school player was a risk the organization was prepared to take.

His words proved prophetic on Day 1, when the Red Sox selected third baseman Triston Casas in the first round and outfielder Nick Decker in the second -- both out of high school. Casas is considered one of the most powerful high school hitters in this year's Draft. Similarly, Decker drew the Red Sox's eye for his powerful swing and his speed.

Video: Draft 2018: Red Sox draft 1B/3B Triston Casas No. 26

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

"[Casas] is a very good hitter, and he has a lot of power," Rikard said. "We're going to start him at third base and see how that goes."

The Day 3 decisions showed a similar willingness to develop young potential, as the Red Sox took 12 high school players.

But the Red Sox focused primarily on college players on Day 2 of the Draft, opting for experienced arms with the potential to contribute earlier. They took only collegiate players -- all upperclassmen -- and started off Day 3 with a similarly college-heavy trend through the 19th round, except for the 11th-round pick of high school pitcher Nicholas Northcut.

As the day went on, the Red Sox's emphasis on experience waned. In rounds 20 through 40, they drafted 11 high school players and three from junior college. College players took up 22 of the Red Sox's picks -- players who are more likely to contribute in the Major Leagues earlier.

"We're very excited about all of them," Rikard said. "We think we got some good impactful players on both sides ... and a mix of young and old."

The pitching trend started in the third round, when TCU right-handed pitcher Durbin Feltman was drafted with the No. 100 pick. Feltman flashes a fiery fastball with a strong slider, and MLB.com analysts said Feltman could reach the Majors as early as this season.

"We did not draft him with those intentions," Rikard said. "We essentially selected him knowing he's a very good pitcher and we're going to get him in our system and see how things go."

Video: Draft 2018: Red Sox draft RHP Durbin Feltman No. 100

Day 2 also saw the Red Sox draft pitchers Thad Ward and Brian Brown, who were both commended by their college coaches for their command under pressure. Ward has most of his experience as a reliever, but made five starts in 22 appearances this season, boasting a 3.27 ERA. Brown, North Carolina State's go-to pitcher this season, ended the year with a 2.74 ERA through 16 starts.

The Red Sox hammered home the pitching trend in Day 3, taking 16 pitchers in rounds 11 through 40. They also took plenty of position players, adding four catchers, three late-round shortstops, nine outfielders and eight second or third basemen over the course of the Draft.

The emphasis on pitching follows a similar pattern to 2017, when the Red Sox drafted 18 pitchers through 40 rounds. But unlike last year, when the Red Sox took 26 college players, age was not as influential a factor.

"We certainly feel we had a nice blend of high school players to old players," Rikard said.

Blake Richardson is a reporter for MLB.com based in Boston.

Boston Red Sox

Pomeranz to DL with left biceps tendinitis

Red Sox recall Workman, will promote Beeks to fill rotation spot
MLB.com

BOSTON -- The Red Sox had an addition to their recent parade of injuries on Tuesday, as starter Drew Pomeranz was placed on the 10-day disabled list with left biceps tendinitis. The move was made retroactive to Saturday.

To fill Pomeranz's spot on the roster, the club recalled righty Brandon Workman from Triple-A Pawtucket. Left-hander Jalen Beeks will be recalled from Triple-A Pawtucket on Thursday to start in place of Pomeranz.

View Full Game Coverage

BOSTON -- The Red Sox had an addition to their recent parade of injuries on Tuesday, as starter Drew Pomeranz was placed on the 10-day disabled list with left biceps tendinitis. The move was made retroactive to Saturday.

To fill Pomeranz's spot on the roster, the club recalled righty Brandon Workman from Triple-A Pawtucket. Left-hander Jalen Beeks will be recalled from Triple-A Pawtucket on Thursday to start in place of Pomeranz.

View Full Game Coverage

Beeks, ranked No. 15 among Red Sox prospects by MLB Pipeline, has dazzled at Pawtucket this season, posting a 2.56 ERA and 0.98 WHIP.

"The way he looks, the way we lined up for the rest of the week, it makes sense to bring him up and get him here, see how he goes," Red Sox manager Alex Cora said.

Steven Wright was inserted into the rotation on Tuesday to give the other starters extra rest, and he dazzled, pitching seven brilliant innings in a 6-0 win over the Tigers. It could be that Beeks makes the one start before going back to Triple-A, and Wright takes over the fifth spot in the rotation.

Position players Mookie Betts (left abdominal strain) and Dustin Pedroia (left knee inflammation) went on the disabled list this past weekend.

What happened with Pomeranz?

"Coming out of the Houston start, it was kind of like hard for him to bounce back, so we decided to put him on the DL," Cora said. "Hopefully it's something that he'll come back from right away."

The earliest Pomeranz is eligible to pitch for the Red Sox again is June 12 at Baltimore.

Though ace Chris Sale could have pitched Thursday in place of Pomeranz with five days of rest, Cora is opting to go with his original plan of Sale starting Friday against the White Sox.

"We feel they need that; for them to catch a breather. No way we were going to move them up after their mind was set to have their off-days and go through their preparation that way," Cora said.

The Red Sox are mulling their options for the finale of this three-game series against the Tigers. They could have a "bullpen" game, or call someone up from Pawtucket.

Pomeranz started the season on the DL with a left forearm flexor strain, and has struggled since his return, going 1-3 with a 6.81 ERA in eight starts.

Mookie making progress
Betts is making incremental progress from the injury that has kept him out of action since May 27. Betts hit off a tee prior to Tuesday's game. If he can advance to regular batting practice in the next couple of days, there's a chance he could be activated when he is first eligible on Friday night.

But if Cora learned anything last week, it was to not get ahead of himself.

"He said he feels great, he feels better," Cora said. "So he was feeling better in Houston, and then he took a few swings and he decided not to keep going, so we'll see how it goes."

Houston, we have a problem
The Red Sox had a tough time getting home from Houston after Sunday night's win.

"We got in at 9 a.m. [Monday]," Cora said. "Mechanical problems, which, I was like, we can't complain about this. It's either get in at 9 or take our chances. I mean, honestly. Somebody asked me, 'Can you believe this?' I was like, 'Yeah. I want to get home [safely].' I think we left Houston like at 3:50 in the morning, Whatever that was. I walked in and saw one of the twins smiling at me at 10 in the morning. So that was cool."

Cora's twin boys are almost 10 months old.

Pedroia gets peace of mind
Pedroia got good news on Tuesday in his visit with Dr. Riley Williams, who performed Pedroia's cartilage restoration procedure last October.

"With Pedey, everything about the surgery is fine. He just has some inflammation. I was actually talking to him during the game. It's kind of like with David [Price], after he saw the doctor, now he can calm down and get treatment and hopefully he'll be with us sooner than later," Cora said. "It's nothing that has to do with surgery, so that's good."

The earliest Pedroia is eligible to be activated is Saturday. Because he played in just three games before returning to the DL, the Red Sox might be conservative with his timetable.

"Treatment [Wednesday]," Cora said. "He hasn't gotten treatment the last two days. Then we go from there. I think he should be back to baseball activities, slowly but surely, probably starting in two days."

Ian Browne has covered the Red Sox for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @IanMBrowne and Facebook.

Boston Red Sox, Drew Pomeranz, Brandon Workman

Sox draft HS slugger Casas, add OF Decker

MLB.com

BOSTON -- On a recent visit to Fenway Park, left-handed slugger Triston Casas took a look around the historic yard and imagined his opposite-field stroke doing serious damage at some point in the future.

• Draft Tracker: Follow every Red Sox Draft pick

BOSTON -- On a recent visit to Fenway Park, left-handed slugger Triston Casas took a look around the historic yard and imagined his opposite-field stroke doing serious damage at some point in the future.

• Draft Tracker: Follow every Red Sox Draft pick

That vision came closer to becoming a reality on Monday, when the Red Sox made the 18-year-old corner infielder the 26th overall pick in the 2018 Draft.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

"I'm glad the way the board fell and I feel like Boston's a great fit for me, and I couldn't be happier with the way turned out, to be honest," said Casas.

The South Florida native became intrigued by Boston when the Red Sox had him in for a pre-Draft visit.

"It was a great experience, going to Boston. It was my first time in Boston and in Massachusetts, so I really enjoyed my time there," said Casas. "I really loved the city and I love the build of it and I love the way that Fenway fit right in the middle of it, just like another building.

"I'm really excited and I can't be more happy with the way today turned out. I feel like the park suits my swing well, and hopefully I get up to the big league club soon and make an impact."

According to scouts, Casas has as much raw power as any high schooler in this year's Draft. The lefty has a 6-4, 238-pound frame with projectable power. He has a commitment to the University of Miami. Casas played third base at American Heritage (Fla.) High School, but could wind up as a first baseman at the professional level.

Video: Draft 2018: Casas on being 26th overall pick

"The one thing that has always stuck out in Triston's case is his opposite-field power," said Red Sox director of amateur scouting Mike Rikard. "He can hit the ball to left-center as far as many other right-handed hitters can when they pull the ball. That's always been a big thing in scouting him. He's got a very professional approach. Although he is a power hitter, he does have a nice plan at the plate, and he was able to make adjustments, and just as importantly, he can use the whole field very well for a young hitter."

The Red Sox took another high schooler with their second pick Monday night, snagging outfielder Nick Decker of Seneca High School in Tabernacle, N.J., with the 64th overall pick.

"[Decker] actually played for a team that was coached by our area scout Ray Fagnant, so we had a personal-relationship advantage with Ray getting to know him, being in the dugout with him and so forth, and Nick's a very strong kid," said Rikard. "He's got a real, strong, powerful swing. We'll start him in center field. He's got instincts, and he's a pretty good runner. We're excited. Really, probably his best tool is his power, so a power-hitting center fielder is what we have."

As for Casas, he liked the fact the Red Sox drafted him as a third baseman.

"It means a lot," Casas said. "I worked really hard on making myself more versatile. I'm happy that they're going to give me a shot over there and hopefully I can play pretty well."

Video: Triston Casas on importance of staying fit

But Casas' bat is his calling card. He has a mature hitting approach for his age, and is known for his natural ability to create backspin.

"I've kind of had that ability ever since I started playing baseball," said Casas. "It was preached to me at a young age to hit the ball to all fields and try to become a complete hitter, because I knew I was going to become big and strong, so at that point it was just having the ability to barrel up balls and the balls that I got a little backspin on happened to go out of the yard, so it was instilled to me at a young age to try to become a complete hitter and let the power come."

Rikard saw that power come to life during the pre-Draft visit to Fenway.

"He looked good. One of his biggest strengths is his power," said Rikard. "Typically in those workout settings, it's more about a last opportunity to spend time with these kids and get to know them on a little bit more of an intimate level. We typically do some batting practice, and he shows very well in that area, because his power is really good."

Video: Triston Casas wants to have lunch with Ted Williams

Casas made a big impression with USA Baseball, winning three gold medals and leading the 18U squad to its fourth consecutive world championship in 2017.

In his senior year of high school, Casas slashed .385/.545/.884 with seven homers, six doubles, six triples, 31 runs and 35 RBIs in 78 at-bats.

Video: Casas on having family supporting him at 2018 Draft

The Red Sox's second-round pick, Decker, is also a left-handed hitter, and is having a terrific senior season, batting .492 (29-for-59) with five doubles, two triples, seven home runs, and 24 RBIs in 2018. His team is still alive in the playoffs and will play in the state semifinals on Friday.

Video: Draft 2018: Red Sox draft OF Nick Decker No. 64

The Draft continues on Tuesday with Rounds 3-10. The MLB.com preview show begins at 12:30 p.m. ET, with exclusive coverage beginning at 1 p.m. ET.

Ian Browne has covered the Red Sox for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @IanMBrowne and Facebook.

Boston Red Sox

Red Sox aim to use Draft to restock after trades

MLB.com

BOSTON -- Mookie Betts and Andrew Benintendi, the Nos. 1 and 2 hitters for the Red Sox, provide an example each day of the value a team can get from picking right in the Draft. Boston will try to find the next wave of homegrown stars this week.

The 2018 Draft will take place through Wednesday, beginning with the Draft preview show on MLB Network and MLB.com at 6 p.m. ET today. MLB Network will broadcast the first 43 picks (Round 1 and Competitive Balance Round A), while MLB.com will stream all 78 picks on Day 1. MLB.com will also provide live pick-by-pick coverage of Rounds 3-10 on Day 2, with a preview show beginning at 12:30 p.m. ET. Then, Rounds 11-40 can be heard live on MLB.com on Day 3, beginning at noon ET.

BOSTON -- Mookie Betts and Andrew Benintendi, the Nos. 1 and 2 hitters for the Red Sox, provide an example each day of the value a team can get from picking right in the Draft. Boston will try to find the next wave of homegrown stars this week.

The 2018 Draft will take place through Wednesday, beginning with the Draft preview show on MLB Network and MLB.com at 6 p.m. ET today. MLB Network will broadcast the first 43 picks (Round 1 and Competitive Balance Round A), while MLB.com will stream all 78 picks on Day 1. MLB.com will also provide live pick-by-pick coverage of Rounds 3-10 on Day 2, with a preview show beginning at 12:30 p.m. ET. Then, Rounds 11-40 can be heard live on MLB.com on Day 3, beginning at noon ET.

Go to MLB.com/Draft to see the Top 200 Prospects list, projected top picks from MLB Pipeline analysts Jim Callis and Jonathan Mayo, the complete order of selection and more. And follow @MLBDraft on Twitter to see what Draft hopefuls, clubs and experts are saying.

Here's how the Draft is shaping up for the Red Sox, whose first selection is the 26th overall pick.

:: 2018 Draft coverage ::

In about 50 words

The Red Sox have developed a plethora of impact position players in recent years, but the opposite has been true with starting pitchers. There is some urgency within the organization to find some impact arms who can become key rotation members down the road. Jay Groome, who was selected 12th overall two years ago, could certainly become one, but he is currently recovering from Tommy John surgery.

The scoop

Last year, while picking 24th, the Red Sox grabbed a strong righty starter in Tanner Houck. The club could find another big arm picking two spots lower. A college pitcher could certainly help the Red Sox sooner than a high school arm. This is Mike Rikard's fourth season leading the Draft board for the Red Sox, and he came up with Benintendi with the seventh overall pick in his first year.

First-round buzz

MLB Pipeline gurus Jonathan Mayo and Jim Callis both have the Red Sox taking a corner infielder with their first pick. Mayo thinks the Red Sox will take Clemson first baseman Seth Beer, who can also play the outfield and is known for his power. Callis is projecting the Sox will snag Magnolia high school (Texas) third baseman Jordan Groshans, one of the best young bats in the country.

Money matters

Under the Collective Bargaining Agreement, each team has an allotted bonus pool equal to the sum of the values of that club's selections in the first 10 rounds of the Draft. The more picks a team has, and the earlier it picks, the larger the pool. The signing bonuses for a team's selections in the first 10 rounds, plus any bonus greater than $125,000 for a player taken after the 10th round, will apply toward the bonus-pool total.

Any team going up to five percent over its allotted pool will be taxed at a 75-percent rate on the overage. A team that overspends by 5-10 percent gets a 75-percent tax plus the loss of a first-round pick. A team that goes 10-15 percent over its pool amount will be hit with a 100-percent penalty on the overage and the loss of a first- and second-round pick. Any overage of 15 percent or more gets a 100-percent tax plus the loss of first-round picks in the next two Drafts.

This year, the Red Sox have a pool of $ $5,723,300 to spend in the first 10 rounds, including $2,552,800 to spend on their first selection.

Shopping list

After trading major prospects to land Chris Sale and Craig Kimbrel, the Red Sox are looking to shore up the farm system with bats and arms. Under Rikard, the club has seldom drafted based on positional need and will simply try to stock the system with as many impact players as it can find. This Draft is a crucial one for Boston in trying to re-establish its farm system.

Trend watch

While the Sox definitely favored college players during Theo Epstein's time as general manager, the club has taken a much more balanced approach in recent years. Two years ago, they got perhaps the most talented arm in the Draft in the first round with Groome. Last year, they went back to college with Houck. Given the need for more pitching in the immediate future, the Red Sox could lean to the college ranks for arms, but take a longer-term approach on bats.

Rising fast

Talk about rising fast. Benintendi was drafted just three years ago and is in his second season as a full-time outfielder and top-of-the-order hitter for the Red Sox. The reason Boston was able to grab Benintendi, however, was due to a last-place finish in 2014. The club would prefer to keep finishing in first place and try to find a solid Draft pick toward the end of the first round.

Cinderella story

J.D. Martinez was a 20th-round pick of the Astros in 2009, and is now one of the best hitters and sluggers in the game. The late-round selection of Martinez is a reminder to the Red Sox and every other team to stay equally focused on Days 2 and 3 of the Draft.

In the show

Betts, Benintendi, Dustin Pedroia, Jackie Bradley Jr., Blake Swihart, Matt Barnes, Brian Johnson and Austin Maddox are all current Red Sox players the team acquired through the Draft. The Sox will try to keep that momentum going by getting several more future Major Leaguers this year.

The Red Sox's recent top picks

2017: Tanner Houck, RHP, (Class A Advanced Salem)
2016: Jay Groome, LHP (Recovering from Tommy John surgery, won't pitch in 2018)
2015: Andrew Benintendi, LF, (Red Sox)
2014: Michael Chavis, 3B (Double-A Portland)
2013: Trey Ball, LHP (Double-A Portland)

Ian Browne has covered the Red Sox for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @IanMBrowne and Facebook.

Boston Red Sox