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On The Move: Trades & Transactions

Nationals trade Cole to Yankees for cash

MLB.com

SAN FRANCISCO -- The Nationals traded right-hander A.J. Cole to the Yankees on Monday night in exchange for cash considerations.

Cole, 26, broke camp in Washington's rotation before he was replaced after a few rough outings. He was designated for assignment on Friday.

SAN FRANCISCO -- The Nationals traded right-hander A.J. Cole to the Yankees on Monday night in exchange for cash considerations.

Cole, 26, broke camp in Washington's rotation before he was replaced after a few rough outings. He was designated for assignment on Friday.

Cole spent most of his career as a spot starter for the Nationals, but he never pitched consistently enough to stick in the Majors. In four seasons, Cole posted 5.32 ERA in 110 innings. He made four appearances, including two starts, this season and posted a 13.06 ERA.

Cole was once a highly touted prospect after the Nationals selected him in the fourth round of the 2010 MLB Draft. The club already traded him once in 2011 as part of the deal that landed Gio Gonzalez in Washington. Cole was reunited with the Nats in '13 as part of a three-team trade.

Jamal Collier has covered the Nationals for MLB.com since 2016. Follow him on Twitter at @jamalcollier.

Washington Nationals, A.J. Cole

Melky signs Minor League deal with Indians

MLB.com

CLEVELAND -- With an offense still working to find its rhythm in the season's first month and one outfielder currently on the disabled list, the Indians have added some experience to their depth chart.

MLB.com confirmed on Monday night that Cleveland has agreed to a Minor League contract with veteran outfielder Melky Cabrera, pending the completion of a physical. Cabrera will head to the Indians' headquarters in Goodyear, Ariz., prior to joining an affiliate.

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CLEVELAND -- With an offense still working to find its rhythm in the season's first month and one outfielder currently on the disabled list, the Indians have added some experience to their depth chart.

MLB.com confirmed on Monday night that Cleveland has agreed to a Minor League contract with veteran outfielder Melky Cabrera, pending the completion of a physical. Cabrera will head to the Indians' headquarters in Goodyear, Ariz., prior to joining an affiliate.

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As things currently stand, the Indians are featuring All-Star Michael Brantley in left field, Bradley Zimmer in center and Tyler Naquin in right, with Rajai Davis and Brandon Guyer getting playing time mostly against lefties. Lonnie Chisenhall, who opened the year as the Tribe's starting right fielder, is on the DL with a right calf injury and likely remains a few weeks from a potential return.

Collectively, Indians outfielders have posted a 66 Weighted Runs Created Plus (wRC+) through 20 games, indicating that the group has played 34 percent below league average.

Video: KC@CWS: Cabrera makes a leaping catch at the wall

Cabrera, 33, spent 156 games between tours with the White Sox and Royals last season. The switch-hitting corner outfielder posted a .285/.324/.423 slash line with 17 home runs, 85 RBIs and a 98 wRC+. Overall, Cabrera had a combined minus 20 Defensive Runs Saved (minus 10 in 348 2/3 innings in right field and minus 10 in 878 innings in left) in 2017.

In parts of 13 Major League seasons, Cabrera has hit .286/.335/.418 in 1,676 games with the Yankees, Braves, Royals, Giants, Blue Jays and White Sox.

Jordan Bastian has covered the Indians for MLB.com since 2011, and previously covered the Blue Jays from 2006-10. Read his blog, Major League Bastian, follow him on Twitter @MLBastian and Facebook.

Cleveland Indians, Melky Cabrera

Yankees acquire righty Cole from Nationals

MLB.com

NEW YORK -- Adding depth to the back end of their pitching staff, the Yankees acquired right-hander A.J. Cole from the Nationals on Monday evening in exchange for cash considerations.

Cole, 26, broke camp in Washington's rotation at the start of this season and made two starts before being shuttled to the bullpen. He was designated for assignment on Friday.

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NEW YORK -- Adding depth to the back end of their pitching staff, the Yankees acquired right-hander A.J. Cole from the Nationals on Monday evening in exchange for cash considerations.

Cole, 26, broke camp in Washington's rotation at the start of this season and made two starts before being shuttled to the bullpen. He was designated for assignment on Friday.

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In four big league seasons with Washington, Cole posted a 5.32 ERA in 110 innings. He made four appearances this year, going 1-1 with a 13.06 ERA. Cole was once a touted prospect after the Nationals selected him in the fourth round of the 2010 Draft.

Cole will be added to the Yankees' 25-man roster. Right-hander David Hale was designated for assignment in a corresponding move. Making his Yankees debut, Hale pitched two scoreless innings in New York's 14-1 victory over the Twins on Monday.

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

New York Yankees, A.J. Cole

Dodgers designate reliever Font for assignment

MLB.com

LOS ANGELES -- To make room on the roster for rookie right-hander Walker Buehler, the Dodgers designated reliever Wilmer Font for assignment on Monday.

When a player's contract is designated for assignment -- often abbreviated "DFA" -- that player is immediately removed from his club's 40-man roster. Within seven days of the transaction (had been 10 days under the 2012-16 Collective Bargaining Agreement), the player can either be traded or placed on irrevocable outright waivers.

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LOS ANGELES -- To make room on the roster for rookie right-hander Walker Buehler, the Dodgers designated reliever Wilmer Font for assignment on Monday.

When a player's contract is designated for assignment -- often abbreviated "DFA" -- that player is immediately removed from his club's 40-man roster. Within seven days of the transaction (had been 10 days under the 2012-16 Collective Bargaining Agreement), the player can either be traded or placed on irrevocable outright waivers.

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Font was out of options. He appeared in six games with the Dodgers this season and went 0-2 with an 11.32 ERA, allowing 13 earned runs over 10 1/3 innings while striking out seven.

The Dodgers expect to lose Font on waivers, as they did another player who was out of options, Trayce Thompson. Font, 27, was named the Pacific Coast League's Pitcher of the Year last year, leading the league in ERA, WHIP, opponents' batting average and strikeouts.

"We needed to make room for Walker, and carrying nine relievers is a little excessive," said manager Dave Roberts. "We just didn't have the innings for him to pitch consistently. We know there's some interest in him in the market and, hopefully, he lands on a Major League club.

Font's most demanding outing came on April 2, when he pitched four scoreless innings of relief before allowing a pair of runs in his fifth inning of work and suffering an 8-7 loss in 15 innings in Arizona.

Injury updates on Forsythe, Hill
Logan Forsythe, placed on the 10-day disabled list April 15 with right shoulder inflammation, tested his ability to throw on Monday but still felt discomfort. Forsythe, long a second baseman, developed the inflammation after being required to make longer throws as the fill-in for injured third baseman Justin Turner. It's unclear whether Forsythe will be strictly a second baseman when he returns.

"When he'll be going on a rehab assignment I don't know, but I would say that once it does start, it's for sure a four- or five-game stint at the minimum," said Roberts.

Rich Hill came out of a Monday bullpen with no discomfort in his left middle finger and is scheduled to throw a simulated game on Tuesday. That would make him a candidate to start Sunday in San Francisco.

Ken Gurnick has covered the Dodgers since 1989, and for MLB.com since 2001.

Los Angeles Dodgers, Wilmer Font

Lauer draws Coors Field start for MLB debut

Padres No. 12 prospect will start Tuesday vs. Rockies in tough pitching environment
MLB.com

DENVER -- It's not often that a pitching prospect is tasked with a Coors Field debut. For most, the challenge of a first big league start is daunting enough -- without factoring the sport's most hitter-friendly environment into the equation.

In the eyes of the Padres, Eric Lauer isn't most starting pitchers.

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DENVER -- It's not often that a pitching prospect is tasked with a Coors Field debut. For most, the challenge of a first big league start is daunting enough -- without factoring the sport's most hitter-friendly environment into the equation.

In the eyes of the Padres, Eric Lauer isn't most starting pitchers.

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Faced with an opening in its starting rotation on Tuesday, the San Diego front office mulled the pros and cons of calling up Lauer. Yes, the 22-year-old left-hander had earned the opportunity with an impressive Spring Training followed by three solid starts for Triple-A El Paso. But Coors Field loomed.

On Monday it became official: The Padres have settled on Lauer to fill the void in their rotation. The even-keel demeanor of the Padres' No. 12 prospect played a major part in their decision to make him just the seventh starter in Coors Field history to debut against the Rockies.

"He's just got confidence in himself," said Padres catcher Austin Hedges. "All spring, whether it was hanging around the guys in the clubhouse, at the field, away from the field, he just doesn't seem fazed. Life seems like it moves slow for him. We like those low-heartbeat guys."

Said Lauer: "I've got to pitch here at some point if I want to stay here, so it doesn't bother me that much."

Easier said than done. Results from the first six starters to debut at Coors Field are mixed. But for the most part, the numbers aren't pretty. They've combined to post a 7.27 ERA and none lasted longer than five innings.

Marco Gonzales, STL 6/25/14: 5 IP, 5 ER, 3 K
Anthony Bass, SD 6/13/11: 5 IP, ER, K
Ty Taubenheim, TOR 5/20/06: 5 IP, 3 ER, 3 K
Marcus Jones, OAK, 7/17/00: 2 1/3 IP, 4 ER, K
Chris Brock, ATL, 6/11/97: 4 IP, 3 ER, 2 K
Matt Ruebel, PIT, 5/21/96: 4 2/3 IP, 5 ER, K

Among that group, only Bass earned a win. None of the six compiled more than three strikeouts.

"I saw some stuff where people were saying that it's not a great place to start your career," Lauer said. "But if I want to stay here, I'm going to pitch here. You've got to pitch your game."

Lauer learned he'd be starting last Thursday, after Luis Perdomo was optioned to Triple-A El Paso. Lauer was scratched from his Friday start in Reno and told to prepare for Tuesday in Denver.

Lauer said he "blacked out" for a moment when Padres general manager A.J. Preller broke the news to him over the phone.

"It's been kind of tough to keep under wraps and not get too excited about it," Lauer said. "It's been a blur."

Lauer arrives in the Majors with a fastball/curveball/changeup mix, but he'll almost certainly rely on his low-to-mid-90s fastball ahead of his offspeed pitches. The Padres are hopeful that pitch will play particularly well at high altitude on Tuesday.

Lauer will be the second highly-touted Padres starting pitching prospect from the 2016 Draft class to debut this season. Fellow left-hander Joey Lucchesi is off to a fast start, having posted a 2.70 ERA and 29 strikeouts over five starts.

Video: SD@COL: Lucchesi earns first career win vs. Rockies

For the most part, Lauer and Lucchesi have progressed through the Padres' system at the same rate (and they've been throwing partners along the way). Their ascension to the big leagues may have come faster than expected, but the Padres have never been shy about promoting their prospects.

"With the direction that we're moving, the Padres are showing that they're willing to bring up the guys that they've invested in," Lauer said. "I think it's just going to snowball. This is just the beginning."

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

San Diego Padres

Anderson has homecoming to remember

Before family and friends, Houston native makes Major League debut
MLB.com

HOUSTON -- Right-hander Justin Anderson was so overcome with emotion when he found out he was being called up to the big leagues for the first time that he didn't even think to ask where he was meeting the Angels to make his roster debut.

When his girlfriend told him the Angels were playing in his hometown of Houston, Anderson, in his words, "just lost it."

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HOUSTON -- Right-hander Justin Anderson was so overcome with emotion when he found out he was being called up to the big leagues for the first time that he didn't even think to ask where he was meeting the Angels to make his roster debut.

When his girlfriend told him the Angels were playing in his hometown of Houston, Anderson, in his words, "just lost it."

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"It was like, you've got to be kidding me," Anderson said. "It was meant to be. You couldn't script it."

He also couldn't have scripted how the rest of the night played out. Anderson was called upon in the eighth inning of Monday's 2-0 win, tasked with holding the Angels' two-run lead and preserving an outstanding seven-inning gem by starter Tyler Skaggs.

Anderson retired Max Stassi and Josh Reddick before allowing back-to-back singles to George Springer and Jose Altuve. The inning ended with a strikeout of Carlos Correa.

"Working with [catcher Martin Maldonado], he did a really good job working with me back there," Anderson said. "That whole game plan was to listen to him, trust my stuff. I heard the crowd [during Correa's at-bat], and … I told myself, 'Hush them. Get them to be quiet.' And that's what I did."

The callup of Anderson, a graduate of Houston's St. Pius X High School, was part of a flurry of roster moves the Angels made before the game. They placed right-hander Blake Wood on the 10-day disabled list with a right elbow posterior impingement, recalled righty Eduardo Paredes from Triple-A Salt Lake and added Anderson to the Major League roster.

Given how much the bullpen has pitched of late, Anderson sensed he might see action on Monday. Manager Mike Scioscia acknowledged after the game that a taxed relief corps had something to do with using the rookie in one of the most crucial, high-leverage points of the game.

Scioscia also wasn't surprised when Anderson came through.

"It's one of the reasons why Justin is here," Scioscia said. "We have a lot of confidence in his upside. He's got a power arm, and tonight was a game where you take the water wings off and throw him in the deep end. We really didn't have a lot to go to. We were confident in giving him the ball, as you could see. He's got great stuff."

Anderson estimated that around 50 friends, family members and former teammates from the University of Texas-San Antonio would be attending Monday's opener.

He heard most of those 50 people when he ran in from the 'pen.

"It's all I heard," he said. "It was quiet, but I could hear my friends and family pulling for me."

Wood on the mend

Meanwhile, Scioscia anticipates that Wood will need only the minimum 10 days to recover from his ailment. The 32-year-old made 13 relief appearances, totaling 11 2/3 innings, with a 2.31 ERA.

Scioscia said that Wood was trying to get loose on Sunday when he felt tightness in his triceps.

"We just want to make sure we take care of this," he said. "With a 10-day DL, we can make sure we nurse it back and he can throw a little bit and make sure he's 100 percent ready."

Simmons' return imminent

Shortstop Andrelton Simmons, who left Sunday's game after being hit on the right forearm with a pitch, is expected back in the lineup as early as Tuesday.

Scioscia wanted to give Simmons Monday off, mainly as a precaution.

Video: SF@LAA: Simmons gets hit, exits in the 3rd

"He's good," Scioscia said. "He's definitely due for a day off. He's been grinding it out. Just to make sure this is behind him. ... It was really stiff when he was trying to throw yesterday when it happened. I think he feels a lot better today, but we want to give him the extra day to make sure it's totally behind him."

Encouraging news about Bridwell

General manager Billy Eppler confirmed that right-hander Parker Bridwell, currently pitching for Triple-A Salt Lake City, underwent an MRI in Los Angeles on Monday afternoon.

"The findings of the MRI were unremarkable and presented no evidence of acute trauma to the ligament in his elbow," Eppler said in an email to reporters. "He has been diagnosed with elbow inflammation and will be cleared to throw once his symptoms subside."

Alyson Footer is a national correspondent for MLB.com. Follow her on Twitter @alysonfooter.

Los Angeles Angels

Rockies summon Musgrave; Rusin put on DL

Callup expected to have similar role as veteran lefty reliever
MLB.com

DENVER -- Left-hander Harrison Musgrave had a memorable Major League deubt during the Rockies' otherwise forgettable 13-5 loss to the Padres on Monday night at Coors Field.

Musgrave, who was 0-1 with a 3.38 ERA at Triple-A Albuquerque, was added to the bullpen Monday to replace lefty Chris Rusin, who was placed on the 10-day disabled list with a right intercostal strain. Musgrave turned in a decent Rusin imitation, striking out one in a clean sixth inning while protecting a 5-4 lead.

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DENVER -- Left-hander Harrison Musgrave had a memorable Major League deubt during the Rockies' otherwise forgettable 13-5 loss to the Padres on Monday night at Coors Field.

Musgrave, who was 0-1 with a 3.38 ERA at Triple-A Albuquerque, was added to the bullpen Monday to replace lefty Chris Rusin, who was placed on the 10-day disabled list with a right intercostal strain. Musgrave turned in a decent Rusin imitation, striking out one in a clean sixth inning while protecting a 5-4 lead.

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"It was cool to get a first-pitch strike, go through and have a clean inning. It was nerve-racking, but it was nice," said Musgrave, a West Virginia University product whose father made the trip for the debut.

Musgrave saw a familiar foe his first batter, inducing a groundout from Carlos Asuaje.

"I faced Asuaje a good bit in Triple-A, so it was nice to see a familiar face the first batter," he said.

Then he fanned Freddy Galvis and threw out Cory Spangenberg after a comebacker.

To add Musgrave to the Major League roster, the Rockies transferred righty Carlos Estevez to the 60-day DL. He had been on the 10-day DL because of an oblique strain he suffered in Spring Training, and now has a right elbow strain.

At least Musgrave will have Rusin as a mentor. Rusin (0-0, 4.97 ERA in eight appearances) was, like Musgrave, a starter who transitioned to bullpen duty. Musgrave has started all but two of his 80 Minor League appearances, but manager Bud Black began using him in relief situations during Spring Training.

Video: Rusin discusses being placed on 10-day disabled list

The Rockies put Musgrave's locker right beside Rusin's.

"The last two years have been more a transition to long relief/spot-start, and I've been looking forward to the opportunity," said Musgrave, 26, an eighth-round pick in the 2014 Draft out of West Virginia University. "I've talked to [Rusin] a few times today to see how he's feeling to pick his brain a little and see how he felt about the transition."

On Sunday, Rusin pitched 1 2/3 scoreless innings, with four of the five outs via strikeout, in the Rockies' 9-7 loss to the Cubs. But he felt the injury on his next-to-last pitch. Rusin, who led the NL last year with 85 relief innings, was turning the corner after an inconsistent early going.

"I struggled with my delivery at the beginning of the season, and it's slowly ironing out, getting into a better rhythm," Rusin said. "It's frustrating that it had to happen yesterday. I was starting to feel a lot better, felt I was back to my form [from] last year."

Estevez, 25, had a 4.91 ERA in four games at Albuquerque, but has not pitched since April 15.

Back to baseball

Third baseman Nolan Arenado served a five-game suspension for his part in the brawl that occurred between the Rockies and Padres on April 11, and outfielder Gerardo Parra served the second game of his four-game suspension Monday. So by the end of this series, Colorado will have played nine of its past 11 games with 24 players (suspended players cannot be replaced).

All that could be a deterrent should bad blood continue, though it didn't when the teams opened a three-game series Monday night.

"It's still affecting us," Rockies center fielder Charlie Blackmon said. "We've got guys suspended. That hurts your team. But at the same time, you've got to stand up for yourself. I think both sides have gotten over it."

At the end of the confrontation, Arenado found himself face to face with Padres bench coach Mark McGwire -- a man he has looked up to -- in an unpleasant conversation. Arenado spoke about it Monday.

"Skip Schumaker is the [Padres'] first-base coach, and I'm really good friends with Skip. I've known him since I was in the eighth grade," Arenado said. "They used to hit at the same cages I used to hit at, and we'd talk hitting. I know them pretty good. It was interesting to see Mark kind of get in my face."

Video: SD@COL: Cavnar joins the booth for play-by-play

Blazing the trail

Monday marked the play-by-play regular-season debut of AT&T SportsNet broadcaster Jenny Cavnar. She was the first woman to do play-by-play for a Rockies game since Gayle Gardner was the first when she called a Rockies-Reds game in 1993.

Cavnar made history in 2015 when she joined the KOA Rockies Radio Network as a color commentator for select games. Cavnar also did play-by-play on a Spring Training game this year.

Thomas Harding has covered the Rockies since 2000, and for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter and like his Facebook page.

Colorado Rockies, Harrison Musgrave, Chris Rusin

Mariners reacquire Elias, target rotation role

MLB.com

SEATTLE -- Looking to add to their starting pitching depth, the Mariners reacquired left-hander Roenis Elias from the Red Sox on Monday in exchange for a player to be named or cash, and they assigned him to Triple-A Tacoma.

Elias has been pitching in relief for Boston's Triple-A Pawtucket affiliate, but the Mariners will build up his pitch count and transition him back to a starting role, general manager Jerry Dipoto said.

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SEATTLE -- Looking to add to their starting pitching depth, the Mariners reacquired left-hander Roenis Elias from the Red Sox on Monday in exchange for a player to be named or cash, and they assigned him to Triple-A Tacoma.

Elias has been pitching in relief for Boston's Triple-A Pawtucket affiliate, but the Mariners will build up his pitch count and transition him back to a starting role, general manager Jerry Dipoto said.

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Elias started 49 games for the Mariners from 2014-15, but he never found a niche with the Red Sox and was moved to the bullpen this year after an injury-plagued 2017 season. The 29-year-old was 1-0 with one save and a 1.23 ERA in 7 1/3 innings through four games with Pawtucket this season.

"I know he's been here before -- it's a name that has come up in the past," manager Scott Servais said. "He might be able to help us out. I think they're talking about stretching him out and starting him at Tacoma, but we'll see what happens. I think it's a really good arm and a guy that creates some depth if we need it as we go along in the season."

Elias was sidelined much of last season with a strained oblique muscle, and he went 1-6 with a 6.96 ERA in 10 rehab starts over several Minor League levels. He made just one appearance for Boston last year, getting a strikeout and a walk in a 10-4 loss to Toronto on Sept. 4.

Elias pitched in three games for the Red Sox in 2016, making his lone start -- ironically against the Mariners -- on June 17 at Fenway Park and giving up seven hits and seven runs over four innings in an 8-4 loss. He spent most of that season with Pawtucket, going 10-5 with a 3.60 ERA in 21 games, including 19 starts.

The Mariners originally signed Elias as a free agent out of Cuba in 2011. He posted a 3.97 ERA with Seattle from 2014-15 in 51 games (49 starts) before he was dealt to the Red Sox with Carson Smith for Jonathan Aro and Wade Miley in December 2015.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners, Roenis Elias

Tigers DFA VerHagen; prospect Gerber recalled

MLB.com

DETROIT -- Tigers manager Ron Gardenhire said at the end of Spring Training that he and his staff would be testing relievers in different situations early in the season to see where each fits best. The club's first major decision appears to be on Drew VerHagen, who was designated for assignment on Monday.

The move opens a roster spot for outfielder Mike Gerber, who was recalled from Triple-A Toledo. Gerber will serve as an extra left-handed bat and outfielder off the bench for the Tigers' upcoming Interleague series at Pittsburgh, where the lack of a designated hitter will put pinch-hitters and double-switches at a premium. MLB Pipeline ranks Gerber as the No. 11 prospect in Detroit's farm system.

DETROIT -- Tigers manager Ron Gardenhire said at the end of Spring Training that he and his staff would be testing relievers in different situations early in the season to see where each fits best. The club's first major decision appears to be on Drew VerHagen, who was designated for assignment on Monday.

The move opens a roster spot for outfielder Mike Gerber, who was recalled from Triple-A Toledo. Gerber will serve as an extra left-handed bat and outfielder off the bench for the Tigers' upcoming Interleague series at Pittsburgh, where the lack of a designated hitter will put pinch-hitters and double-switches at a premium. MLB Pipeline ranks Gerber as the No. 11 prospect in Detroit's farm system.

The Tigers have several relievers with Minor League options who could have been sent down to make room. They chose VerHagen, who's out of options. When a player's contract is designated for assignment -- often abbreviated "DFA" -- that player is immediately removed from his club's 40-man roster, and 25-man roster if he was on that as well. Within seven days of the transaction (it was previously 10 days), the player must either be traded, released or placed on irrevocable outright waivers.

VerHagen, Detroit's fourth-round pick out of Vanderbilt in 2012, owns a 3-5 record and a 5.04 ERA in 73 Major League appearances over five seasons. The 27-year-old right-hander entered the season with a chance to claim a middle-relief role as a situational righty, using his hard sinker and mid-90s fastball to induce ground balls.

Though VerHagen, a former starter, struck out 11 batters over 10 innings this season, he also allowed seven runs on six hits and seven walks. He took the loss in Sunday's 8-5 defeat to the Royals, walking two of the three batters he faced to begin the seventh inning and throwing just five of his 15 pitches for strikes.

"He almost hit two guys in the head, and that's scary," Gardenhire said after the loss. "We needed him to get a couple of outs, and it didn't work out."

VerHagen's struggles in a close game mirrored his performance on Opening Day, when he allowed a walk and a hit in trying to protect a two-run lead over the Pirates in the eighth. While he has been dominant in low- and medium-leverage situations, holding opponents to a .138 average with four walks and nine strikeouts, VerHagen retired just two of seven batters he faced in high-leverage scenarios.

Video: WSH@DET: Gerber slugs a solo homer to right-center

Gerber rejoins the Tigers after making his Major League debut as the 26th man in Friday's doubleheader split against the Royals, pinch-running for Miguel Cabrera in the ninth inning of the nightcap. Though he was optioned back to Toledo after the game, the 26th man rules allow him to be recalled without the normal 10-day wait.

Gerber's return gives Gardenhire a five-man bench for the upcoming series, including DH Victor Martinez and switch-hitters Niko Goodrum and Victor Reyes.

Jason Beck has covered the Tigers for MLB.com since 2002. Read Beck's Blog, follow him on Twitter @beckjason and Facebook.

Detroit Tigers, Mike Gerber, Drew VerHagen

Red Sox deal Elias to Seattle for PTBN or cash

MLB.com

The Mariners acquired left-handed pitcher Roenis Elias from the Red Sox on Monday in exchange for a player to be named later or cash considerations.

Elias, 29, will report to Triple-A Tacoma.

The Mariners acquired left-handed pitcher Roenis Elias from the Red Sox on Monday in exchange for a player to be named later or cash considerations.

Elias, 29, will report to Triple-A Tacoma.

Seattle originally signed Elias as a free agent out of Cuba in 2011. He pitched in 51 games (49 starts) and posted a 3.97 ERA with the Mariners from 2014-15 before he was dealt to the Red Sox with right-hander Carson Smith for right-hander Jonathan Aro and left-hander Wade Miley in December 2015.

Elias played sparingly in the big leagues with Boston, appearing in just four games over the past two seasons. He spent the majority of 2017 on the disabled list with a strained right oblique.

Elias was 1-0 with one save and a 1.23 ERA in 7 1/3 innings for Triple-A Pawtucket this season. He is 15-21 with a 4.20 ERA (134 earned runs in 287 innings) with 244 strikeouts and 114 walks in 287 innings over 55 career Major League games, 50 of them starts.

Chad Thornburg is a reporter for MLB.com based in Los Angeles.

Boston Red Sox, Roenis Elias

Beck up from Triple-A as Gonzalez hits DL

Farquhar transferred to 60-day DL
MLB.com

CHICAGO -- Chris Beck is back with the White Sox, with his contract purchased from Triple-A Charlotte Monday to take the roster spot of Miguel Gonzalez.

Gonzalez was placed on the 10-day disabled list, retroactive to April 19, with right rotator cuff inflammation arising after his Tuesday start in Oakland. To make room for Beck on the 40-man roster, the White Sox transferred Danny Farquhar to the 60-day disabled list.

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CHICAGO -- Chris Beck is back with the White Sox, with his contract purchased from Triple-A Charlotte Monday to take the roster spot of Miguel Gonzalez.

Gonzalez was placed on the 10-day disabled list, retroactive to April 19, with right rotator cuff inflammation arising after his Tuesday start in Oakland. To make room for Beck on the 40-man roster, the White Sox transferred Danny Farquhar to the 60-day disabled list.

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Farquhar, 31, is at Rush University Medical Center after suffering a brain hemorrhage during the sixth inning of Friday night's game against Houston. Additional overnight testing at RUSH revealed that a ruptured aneurysm caused the brain bleed, but following Saturday surgery to address the aneurysm, the White Sox released information Monday describing Farquhar as making overall progress forward.

Beck, 27, is 0-0 with a 2.00 ERA and 13 strikeouts in four games (two starts) with Charlotte this season. The 6-foot-3, 230-pound Beck has limited opponents to a .129 (4-for-31) average. He has gone 4-4 with a 6.38 ERA and 65 strikeouts in 83 games (one start) over parts of three Major League seasons (2015-17) with the White Sox. Beck was selected by the White Sox in the second round of the 2012 Draft.

Video: CWS@CLE: Beck ends the frame with a strikeout

Starting or relieving remain possibilities for Beck. But any role works for the right-hander, as he made clear Monday, when he worked three innings of relief and picked up his first career save during the White Sox 10-4 win against the Mariners.

"It's funny. The guys are like: What would you do to get back to the big leagues? Honestly they could ask me to shine shoes here and I'd figure out how to do it," Beck said. "I'll do whatever to help the team.

"I had a terrible second half [in '17] with fastball command. A lot of free bases. So I went back to the drawing board. Did some things diet-wise to get back in shape."

In preparation for this season, Beck got blood tested and found out he was allergic to dairy, yeast and garlic. He lost 24 pounds during the offseason on the new diet, which has helped with the ease of delivery.

Gonzalez, 33, was hit hard over his first three starts, allowing 17 earned runs on 24 hits and six walks over 12 1/3 innings, while striking out five. He lasted three innings in his last start, against the A's, yielding eight runs on eight hits.

The White Sox signed Gonzalez to a one-year, $4.75 million deal as a free agent in January.

"We thought we were going to be able to take care of it," said White Sox manager Rick Renteria of Gonzalez's injury. "Right now, we just put him on the back burner and let him go ahead and feel better."

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Read his blog, Merk's Works, follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin, on Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Chicago White Sox, Miguel Gonzalez

Mariners acquire RHP Quezada from D-backs

MLB.com

SEATTLE -- The Mariners made a minor deal on Sunday, acquiring right-hander Edwin Quezada from the D-backs in exchange for international slot money.

Quezada, 21, posted a 1.74 ERA in 15 games, including three starts, last year in the Dominican Summer League. The 6-foot-5, 205-pounder struck out 46 in 41 1/3 innings with 17 walks, while holding opposing hitters to a .205 batting average.

SEATTLE -- The Mariners made a minor deal on Sunday, acquiring right-hander Edwin Quezada from the D-backs in exchange for international slot money.

Quezada, 21, posted a 1.74 ERA in 15 games, including three starts, last year in the Dominican Summer League. The 6-foot-5, 205-pounder struck out 46 in 41 1/3 innings with 17 walks, while holding opposing hitters to a .205 batting average.

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners

Rendon's toe injury finally sends him to DL

Nats' third baseman hits shelf after missing seven games
MLB.com

LOS ANGELES -- Anthony Rendon lifted up his leg to reveal the black bruise underneath his left big toe, a result of the ball he fouled off his foot more than a week ago. He had been doing his best to avoid the disabled list, taking batting practice, jogging or trying to field grounders each day. At best, he could have been considered a pinch-hitting option off the bench late in games.

Every time he felt enough improvement to add more pressure to his toe, however, he would come up sore the following day. Finally, prior to Sunday night's game against the Dodgers, the Nationals decided to place Rendon on the DL. Right-hander Austin L. Adams was promoted from Triple-A Syracuse in his place.

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LOS ANGELES -- Anthony Rendon lifted up his leg to reveal the black bruise underneath his left big toe, a result of the ball he fouled off his foot more than a week ago. He had been doing his best to avoid the disabled list, taking batting practice, jogging or trying to field grounders each day. At best, he could have been considered a pinch-hitting option off the bench late in games.

Every time he felt enough improvement to add more pressure to his toe, however, he would come up sore the following day. Finally, prior to Sunday night's game against the Dodgers, the Nationals decided to place Rendon on the DL. Right-hander Austin L. Adams was promoted from Triple-A Syracuse in his place.

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"It's just a slower process than we anticipated," Rendon said. "I think the hardest part is you have days where it feels good and you push it, and then come in the next day and it's sore. It's like you take one step forward and two steps back."

Rendon will miss his eighth consecutive game on Sunday in what will be his ninth day since the foul ball against the Rockies that forced him to exit the game after seven inning on April 13. The Nationals were able to backdate his stint on the DL to April 19, but Washington played with a short roster for more than a week with hopes Rendon could return soon.

And now Rendon can not return to the lineup until next Sunday.

"It wasn't for lack of effort," manager Dave Martinez said. "He was really trying to play. ... When you lose a guy like Rendon, who's a big part of your lineup and he's telling you he'll be available, you got to give him that opportunity. And it got to the point now where he finally realized, 'I can hit, but I can't do the things I need to be doing to help us win.'"

The injury is another blow to the Nationals, as Rendon joins second baseman Daniel Murphy (knee) and left fielder Adam Eaton (ankle) on the shelf. Murphy is at extended spring training, and his return is still a few weeks away. Eaton was eligible to return from the DL on Thursday and Martinez said they are hopeful he could return at some point this week in San Francisco. 

Rendon had been off to a good start batting in front of Bryce Harper in the No. 2 spot in the lineup, posting a slash line of .286/.355/.411 in 14 games. Rendon has been able to hit without pain, but he struggles with the toe while taking ground balls at third base or trying to pivot and throw. With him still feeling pain fielding grounders, he has not attempted to sprint.

"I don't want to come back and be here and be only a pinch-hit threat," Rendon said. "I want to play defense. I want to make sure I'm helping the team."

Jamal Collier has covered the Nationals for MLB.com since 2016. Follow him on Twitter at @jamalcollier.

Washington Nationals, Anthony Rendon

CarGo goes on DL; Rox call up Dahl, Cuevas

Parra begins serving 4-game suspension, Tauchman assigned to Triple-A