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Herm Schneider to become head athletic trainer emeritus in 2019 after 40 seasons with the White Sox

Herm Schneider, the longest tenured athletic trainer in Major League Baseball, will move into a new role with the White Sox in 2019 as head athletic trainer emeritus, the club announced today.
 
Schneider, 66, completed his 40th season with the White Sox in 2018. Originally hired by the Sox prior to the 1979 season, Schneider led one of baseball's most successful and respected medical and training departments during his tenure. He oversaw major rehabilitation programs for Sox players like Bo Jackson (hip), Ozzie Guillen (knee), Robin Ventura (ankle) and Jake Peavy (lat), worked with Michael Jordan on his athletic conversion from basketball to baseball, and twice during his career responded to life-threatening situations, treating Greg Walker in 1988 and Danny Farquhar in 2018.

"The Chicago White Sox have been incredibly fortunate to have Herm Schneider as our organization's trainer for the past 40 years," said White Sox Chairman Jerry Reinsdorf. "Herm was with the White Sox even before my partners and I acquired the team in 1981, and he has provided the very best care to our players over four decades. Countless players owe the extensions of their careers to Herm and his tireless work ethic when it comes to injury prevention and treatment. Well respected across baseball, Herm's commitment to excellence at his craft and focus on keeping players healthy has had an immeasurable impact on our team's performance over the many years. Professional relationships aside, Herm is a very trusted and dear friend, and I look forward to him remaining with the organization in his new emeritus capacity."
 
"While I certainly am proud of all the professional achievements and honors the medical and training staff has received over the past 40 years, it is the friendships and personal relationships that I remember best and make this decision to move into an emeritus role the hardest," said Schneider. "The friendships I have made here will last the rest of my life."

Herm Schneider, the longest tenured athletic trainer in Major League Baseball, will move into a new role with the White Sox in 2019 as head athletic trainer emeritus, the club announced today.
 
Schneider, 66, completed his 40th season with the White Sox in 2018. Originally hired by the Sox prior to the 1979 season, Schneider led one of baseball's most successful and respected medical and training departments during his tenure. He oversaw major rehabilitation programs for Sox players like Bo Jackson (hip), Ozzie Guillen (knee), Robin Ventura (ankle) and Jake Peavy (lat), worked with Michael Jordan on his athletic conversion from basketball to baseball, and twice during his career responded to life-threatening situations, treating Greg Walker in 1988 and Danny Farquhar in 2018.

"The Chicago White Sox have been incredibly fortunate to have Herm Schneider as our organization's trainer for the past 40 years," said White Sox Chairman Jerry Reinsdorf. "Herm was with the White Sox even before my partners and I acquired the team in 1981, and he has provided the very best care to our players over four decades. Countless players owe the extensions of their careers to Herm and his tireless work ethic when it comes to injury prevention and treatment. Well respected across baseball, Herm's commitment to excellence at his craft and focus on keeping players healthy has had an immeasurable impact on our team's performance over the many years. Professional relationships aside, Herm is a very trusted and dear friend, and I look forward to him remaining with the organization in his new emeritus capacity."
 
"While I certainly am proud of all the professional achievements and honors the medical and training staff has received over the past 40 years, it is the friendships and personal relationships that I remember best and make this decision to move into an emeritus role the hardest," said Schneider. "The friendships I have made here will last the rest of my life."

"I have been incredibly fortunate to work for Jerry Reinsdorf for the vast majority of my career and to work with an amazing group of doctors, trainers, executives, managers and staff who all share the same focus -- the best possible care for everyone who wore a White Sox uniform. I look forward to sharing my knowledge and expertise across the organization in whatever manner seems appropriate in 2019," Schneider said.
 
In his new role, Schneider will remain actively engaged with the baseball operations department as an advisor on medical issues relating to free agency, the amateur draft and player acquisition, while continuing to be a resource throughout the training department at the major and minor league levels.
 
"I first met Herm Schneider after being drafted by the White Sox in 1982, and our relationship has continued throughout my playing career, in player development and as a general manager, through the 2005 World Series championship and now in my role as executive vice president with the team," said Ken Williams, White Sox executive vice president. "Herm takes great pride in his profession and his knowledge, is meticulous in his approach to our players' health and has maintained an incredible standard of excellence and care over four decades with the White Sox."
 
From 2002-18, the White Sox have used the disabled list just 185 times for a total of 9,057 days missed, both the lowest totals in the major leagues. During that 17-year span, the Sox have led the American League in fewest player days missed eight times, ranked second four times and third once.
 
A chronological listing of some of Schneider's many career accomplishments:
 
•   Head Athletic Trainer for the American League at the 2016 All-Star Game
•   "Trainer of the Year" at the 2009 Pitch & Hit Club of Chicago's Awards Banquet
•   He and his staff received the 2006 Dick Martin Award for Medical Staff of the Year by Baseball Prospectus
•   Presented by Mayor Richard M. Daley in 2004 with the City of Chicago's Appreciation for outstanding service provided to the White Sox
•   Head Athletic Trainer for the American League at the 2003 All-Star Game at U.S. Cellular Field
•   Assistant trainer for All-Star Games in 1977 at old Yankee Stadium, 1983 at Comiskey Park and 1991 at Toronto
 
"Always the first at the ballpark and the last to leave each night, it is impossible to overstate what Herm Schneider has meant to the White Sox during his 40 years of service to our organization," said Rick Hahn, White Sox senior vice president/general manager. "The ability of our medical and training staffs to keep our players healthy and on the field is unmatched in baseball over the past four decades.
"We are pleased that Herm will remain with the organization in an emeritus status as his knowledge and expertise will continue to be valued," Hahn said. "While Herm will be extremely difficult to replace, discussions are already well underway, and we expect to have a public announcement soon about our future plans for the department."
 
Prior to joining the White Sox, Schneider spent nine seasons in the New York Yankees organization, including two as assistant trainer for the World Champion Yankees in 1977 and 1978.

Schneider, a native of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, moved to upstate New York as a child and received a bachelor's degree from the State University of New York in 1975. He and his wife, Janet, have two children, Daniel and Caitlin, and reside in Naperville.

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