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‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Fenway Park Timeline

1970_1979

1980-1989

1980

As a new decade in Fenway Park history dawned, the Red Sox took a step backwards. Injuries were rampant and the club managed just 83 wins, despite boasting a roster with several products of a productive farm system. The offseason was no kinder, as Carlton Fisk and Fred Lynn became free agents after their contracts weren't delivered in time.

Record: 83-77, 4th in American League East
Manager: Donald W. Zimmer (82-73), John M. Pesky (1-4)
Attendance: 1,956,092

Injuries struck the 1980 Red Sox with a vengeance: Butch Hobson, Fred Lynn and Jerry Remy each missed more than 50 games, while Lynn, Carl Yastrzemski and Jim Rice simultaneously sat on the disabled list at one point.

The 1980 roster was a homegrown team, highlighted by seven products of the farm system in the starting lineup. The only outside addition was 38-year-old first baseman Tony Perez, a free agent signing who led the club in home runs (25) and RBIs (105).

Dennis Eckersley led the team with 12 victories and the pitching future looked bright as young southpaws Bruce Hurst, John Tudor and Bobby Ojeda gained valuable experience.

On May 13, Fred Lynn hit for the cycle in a 10-5 Boston victory over Minnesota, one of the few highlights at Fenway Park in 1980.

Don Zimmer had led the team to three consecutive seasons of more than 90 wins but his club won only 83 games in 1980 and never really contended from mid-May onwards. Zimmer lost his job with five games left in the regular season and Johnny Pesky took over as interim manager.

The negative energy carried over into the offseason, when the team missed a December 20 deadline to tender Carlton Fisk and Fred Lynn contracts for the 1981 season. When the offers arrived in the mail they were postmarked December 22, making Fisk and Lynn free agents. GM Haywood Sullivan claimed that he had mailed the contracts two days late on the advice of the Player Relations Committee but this confusing explanation was of little consolation to Red Sox fans. The team salvaged the situation a bit by dealing Lynn to the California Angels for pitcher Frank Tanana and third baseman Joe Rudi, but Fisk ultimately signed with the Chicago White Sox and the Red Sox got nothing in return for his departure.

1981

The 1981 Major League Baseball season was an unusual one because of a midsummer strike and the Red Sox finished out of the running again. After the season, construction started on a multi-year project to renovate Fenway Park's grandstand roof and install the park's first luxury boxes.

Record: 59-49, 5th in American League East
Manager: Ralph G. Houk
Attendance: 1,060,379

In 1981, Jean Yawkey established the Jean R. Yawkey Trust and transferred team ownership over to it. She also appointed John Harrington as Co-Trustee of the Yawkey Trust. Harrington had worked for Joe Cronin in the American League's office and when Cronin retired, Tom Yawkey hired him to work for the Red Sox. Though he left the club after Tom passed away in 1976, Harrington returned to help Jean oversee the franchise and had a huge impact on the club until the Yawkey Trust sold the Red Sox in 2002.

In preparation for the 1981 season, the Red Sox turned to skipper Ralph "The Major" Houk, a veteran manager who had led the New York Yankees for 11 years. His team entered the new season without Fred Lynn and Carlton Fisk following the contract snafus of the previous December. Fisk signed a deal with the Chicago White Sox in March, while Lynn had been dealt to his hometown California Angels over the winter. Opening Day against the White Sox seemed almost scripted to underscore Haywood Sullivan's postmark faux pas: Fisk hit a three-run homer in a 5-3 Chicago victory against his former Red Sox teammates.

Boston had also traded Rick Burleson and Butch Hobson to the Angels for third baseman Carney Lansford and pitcher Mark Clear during the offseason. This transaction worked out pretty well for the Red Sox, as Lansford won the 1981 AL batting title with a .336 average and Clear led Boston's pitching staff in wins in 1982.

A midseason strike wiped out the schedule from June 11 to August 10 and the season was split into two halves. The Red Sox placed fifth in the first half of the season and ranked second in the latter half, creeping to within half a game of first place on September 25.

The most remarkable game of the year was a September 3 tilt with the Mariners at Fenway Park that entered extra innings tied 7-7. The game went 10 scoreless extra frames and play was suspended until the next day, when Seattle scored the go-ahead and ultimate winning run in the top of the 20th.

In 1981, Fenway Park began undergoing a major renovation project to its roof that was completed in two major phases, one from 1981 to 1982 and the other from 1982 to 1983. The first phase focused on the right field roof, where the construction of 21 luxury boxes began after the 1981 season.

Snapping the Cape Cod Baseball League All-Stars' three-game winning streak at Fenway Park, the Atlantic Collegiate Baseball All-Stars wound up tying the Cape team, 4-4, at Fenway Park on July 20, 1981.

1981 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

July 20 Cape Cod Baseball League 4, Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League 4 (Tie)*

 

* From 1975 to 1987, on a biennial basis, Fenway Park hosted an all-star game between the Cape Code Baseball League and the Atlantic Collegiate League. The all-star game alternated between Fenway Park and sites closer to the ACL's teams, such as Yankee Stadium and Veterans Stadium. In 1988, the Cape Cod Baseball League returned to an intra-league format for their annual all-star game and in 2009, Cape Code League All-Stars returned to Fenway Park for the Cape Cod League All-Star Game, which was played again in 2010.

1982

In 1982, construction of Fenway Park's first true luxury boxes was focused on the first-base side of the park's grandstand roof, replacing roof box seats that were installed in the late 1940s. Wade Boggs also debuted at Fenway Park for the Red Sox, who got off to their best start since 1946 but faded down the stretch. In May, an Old-Timers Day brought back many famous faces to the ballpark

Record: 89-73, 3rd in American League East
Manager: Ralph G. Houk
Attendance: 1,950,124

1982 began on a difficult note for Red Sox fans: in early January, Tony Conigliaro came to Boston to interview for a broadcasting position and on January 9, he suffered a massive heart attack as he was being driven back to Logan Airport by his brother Billy. In the aftermath of the heart attack, Tony spent nearly eight years bedridden before he passed away in 1990.

For the second year in a row, the Red Sox opened up at home against the White Sox and just like in 1981, former Red Sox catcher Carlton Fisk helped lead the White Sox to victory over his old club, going 2 for 3 at the plate in the 3-2 Chicago win.

On May 3, the Red Sox beat visiting Minnesota 6-2 thanks in part to Dave Stapleton's inside-the-park home run. With the victory Boston's record stood at 16-7, their best start since 1946.

For the most part, the Red Sox held onto first place through the All-Star Break but dropped off in the second half and finished six games behind the Brewers.

Though Carney Lansford performed well at the hot corner, rookie Wade Boggs emerged at third base in 1982. Boggs hit .349 with only 381 plate appearances and didn't qualify for the batting title. Dwight Evans again led the team offensively with 32 homers and 98 RBIs. Right-hander Mark Clear posted a 14-9 record, Dennis Eckersley and John Tudor each won 13, and Bob Stanley picked up 12 victories in relief.

Fenway Park renovations in 1982 focused on the first-base side of the grandstand roof, where the construction of the ballpark's first true luxury boxes started with 21 boxes that were built adjacent to the press box towards right field. In addition, over 300 seats were built on the grandstand roof in right field.

For the first time in several decades, Fenway Park hosted an Old-Timers game in 1982 before the Red Sox squared off against the Texas Rangers. Several Red Sox legends appeared and played but the great Ted Williams stole the show with a running shoestring catch that brought the Fenway crowd to its feet.

1982 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

May 1 Old-Timers Game

1983

The renovation to Fenway Park's upper level was completed in 1983 and featured luxury boxes, new sky-view seating and the ballpark's first elevator. On the field, the Red Sox labored through their first losing season in nearly two decades and the franchise suffered through ownership in-fighting.

Record: 78-84, 6th in American League East
Manager: Ralph G. Houk
Attendance: 1,782,285

After 16 consecutive winning seasons, the Red Sox finished under .500 in 1983 and sunk to sixth place.

The only new face on the team was Tony Armas, who was acquired from Oakland in exchange for Carney Lansford during the offseason. Armas hit 36 home runs and 107 RBIs despite hitting just .218. With Lansford gone, Wade Boggs hit .361 and won the batting title, while Jim Rice was the team's main power leader with 39 homers and 126 RBIs. Contributing off the bench was Rick Miller, who went 16 for 35 (.457) as a pinch-hitter.

The pitching staff was led by John Tudor, Bruce Hurst and Bobby Ojeda, three home-grown lefties who combined for 37 wins.

From the start of the year, all of Red Sox Nation knew that 1983 would be Carl Yastrzemski's 23rd and final season. After pre-game ceremonies on October 1, Yaz ran the full circumference of Fenway Park and touched hands with fans in the front seats. The next day, he hit a single in his final game and retired having played in a then-record 3,308 major league games.

A darker moment came on June 6, when a benefit for the stricken Tony Conigliaro was overshadowed by General Partner Buddy LeRoux's announcement that he was taking over the ballclub. Writers dubbed the debacle "Coup LeRoux," but Jean Yawkey, Haywood Sullivan and John Harrington eventually prevailed in court, forcing LeRoux to sell his interest in the Red Sox in 1987.

In 1983, the two-stage renovation of the roof level was completed. The addition of 23 luxury boxes down the left-field line brought Fenway's total to 44 and new roof seats were built on top of the newly tarred roof above both sides of the infield. Fenway Park also received its first elevator when one was installed near Gate D and a new staircase from the ground to the roof helped access the newly expanded upper level.

In addition, the last true bleacher seats (wooden planks without backs) at Fenway Park were removed and replaced with green plastic seats. The bleacher seats remained until 2007, when they were replaced with new ones as part of a project to waterproof the concrete in the bleachers.

Outside of Fenway Park, the Citgo sign in Kenmore Square was repaired and turned back on during the 7th inning stretch on August 10, 1983. It was the first time it had been lit since the late 1979, when it was darkened as a symbol of energy conservation at the urging of then Governor Edward King.

The 1983 All-Star Game between the Cape Cod Baseball League and Atlantic Coast Baseball League teams resulted in a 6-2 Cape victory.

1983 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

July 25 Cape Cod Baseball League 6, Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League 2*

 

* From 1975 to 1987, on a biennial basis, Fenway Park hosted an all-star game between the Cape Code Baseball League and the Atlantic Collegiate League. The all-star game alternated between Fenway Park and sites closer to the ACL's teams, such as Yankee Stadium and Veterans Stadium. In 1988, the Cape Cod Baseball League returned to an intra-league format for their annual all-star game and in 2009, Cape Code League All-Stars returned to Fenway Park for the Cape Cod League All-Star Game, which was played again in 2010.

1984

In February 1984, Lou Gorman took over as Red Sox General Manager and inherited a gifted young pitching staff that was starting to blossom. Also over the offseason, as the new plastic bleacher seats were installed in center-field, the Red Sox installed one red seat back to commemorate the location of the longest home run ever hit at Fenway Park, a 502-foot blast by Ted Williams on June 9, 1946. On May 28, 1984, the club also retired Williams' #9 and Joe Cronin's #4. The numbers of the two legends were the first to be retired by the Red Sox and were placed on façade of the right-field roof. In July, the United State Olympic Baseball team visited Fenway Park to play an exhibition game.

Record: 86-76, 4th in American League East
Manager: Ralph G. Houk
Attendance: 1,661,618

Lou Gorman took over as general manager of the Red Sox on February 1, inheriting a skilled, homegrown pitching staff that included Bruce Hurst, Oil Can Boyd, Bob Ojeda and Al Nipper, all age 26 or younger. Added to the mix on May 15 was 21-year-old Roger Clemens, who was drafted by the Red Sox in 1983 and rocketed up through the minors.

The Red Sox played their first eight games of the 1984 season on the West Coast and were 5½ games out of first place by their home opener at Fenway Park. The Tigers raced to a 35-5 record and by May 24, Boston trailed Detroit by 16½ games.

A pair of popular Red Sox players departed in May. Suffering from knee injuries, Jerry Remy played his last game for the club on May 18. One week later, Dennis Eckersley was traded to the Cubs in exchange for Bill Buckner.

On May 28, the Red Sox officially retired Ted Williams' #9 and Joe Cronin's #4 and placed them on the façade of the right-field roof. They were the first numbers retired by the franchise.

Though the team couldn't keep pace with Detroit, the season was not devoid of exciting moments. On June 28, Dwight Evans completed the cycle by hitting a walk-off, three-run home run in the bottom of the 11th inning.

Tony Armas led the American League with 43 home runs, 123 RBIs, and 339 total bases. With only 32 bases on balls, Armas' his 11 more home runs than he received free passes and that differential remains the largest in history.

In 1984, Haywood Sullivan, commemorated a lone red seat amongst over 6,000 other green bleacher seats. The red seat (Section 42, Row 37, Seat 21) marked the location of the longest home run ever hit in Fenway Park, a 502-foot blast by Red Sox slugger Ted Williams on June 9, 1946.

In addition to recognizing Williams' historic feat, the Red Sox also honored his entire career when they officially retired his #9 along with Joe Cronin's #4 in a ceremony on May 28, 1984. The two legends' numbers were the first to be retired by the Red Sox and were placed on the façade of the right-field roof.

The 1984 United States Olympic Baseball team trounced a team of Park League All-Stars 17-2 at Fenway Park on July 6, 1984. The US team's roster included future MLB stars Will Clark, Barry Larkin, Mark McGwire and B.J. Surhoff, and would go on to lose in that summer's Gold Medal game to Japan's team.

1984 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

May 27 Old-Timers Game

July 6 U. S. Olympic Baseball team 17, Park League All-Stars 2

1985

Under new manager John McNamara, the 1985 Red Sox ended the season with a mediocre 81-81 record. During the summer, the Cape Cod Baseball League All-Stars returned to Fenway Park Fenway Park and defeated the all-star team from the Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League.

Record: 81-81, 5th in American League East
Manager: John F. McNamara
Attendance: 1,786,633

Ralph Houk retired after the 1984 season and the Red Sox turned to another veteran manager, John McNamara.

In McNamara's first game at the helm, Oil Can Boyd beat New York's 46-year-old Phil Niekro at Fenway Park, 9-2. With a 15-13 record in 1985, Can was the only Boston pitcher to reach double digits in the win column and have a winning record. The young pitching staff had growing pains as a whole and Roger Clemens' shoulder surgery limited him to 15 games.

Wade Boggs looked like a magician with the bat again and ended the year with a team-record 240 hits, thanks in part to a 28-game hitting streak in July. Boggs also won his second batting title with a .368 average.

Though the team finished with an unspectacular 81-81 record, the year contained some memorable moments. On July 21, Marty Barrett pulled off the hidden ball trick at Fenway Park just two weeks after doing the same on the road.

On August 6, Red Sox catcher Marc Sullivan went on strike along with other players throughout baseball. The strike lasted only two days but Marc became the first baseball player to go on strike against his father, Red Sox co-owner Haywood Sullivan.

Catcher Rich Gedman hit for the cycle on September 18, with a single on an infield hit and an improbable triple down the left-field line. Gedman's feat was the fourth cycle by a Red Sox player in six seasons.

The Cape Cod League All-Stars defeated their Atlantic College League counterparts in a high-scoring affair at Fenway Park on July 15, 1985.

1985 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

July 15 Cape Cod Baseball League 12, Atlantic College Baseball League 9*

 

* From 1975 to 1987, on a biennial basis, Fenway Park hosted an all-star game between the Cape Code Baseball League and the Atlantic Collegiate League. The all-star game alternated between Fenway Park and sites closer to the ACL's teams, such as Yankee Stadium and Veterans Stadium. In 1988, the Cape Cod Baseball League returned to an intra-league format for their annual all-star game and in 2009, Cape Code League All-Stars returned to Fenway Park for the Cape Cod League All-Star Game, which was played again in 2010.

1986

The 1986 season started off on the right foot when Roger Clemens struck out a major-league record 20 batters in an April game at Fenway Park. On May 17, the club held an Old-Timers game that paid tribute to the 40th anniversary of the Red Sox pennant-winning 1946 squad and invited back non-Red Sox alumni to participate as well, including Joe and Vince DiMaggio who joined their brother Dom on the Fenway Park field. In the fall, the 1986 Red Sox celebrated their own AL Pennant, rallying to defeat the California Angels in the ALCS before advancing to a heartbreaking World Series reminiscent of 1946.

Record: 95-66, 1st in American League East
Manager: John F. McNamara
Attendance: 2,147,641
Postseason: Played in World Series

Roger Clemens made history during the first month of the 1986 season, when he struck out a major-league record 20 Seattle Mariners at Fenway Park on April 29. When Clemens moved his record to 6-0 on May 14, the Red Sox eased into first place and never left. The Rocket ran his unbeaten streak all the way to 14-0 by the middle of the summer, en route to both Most Valuable Player and Cy Young honors that year. Clemens even won the All-Star Game in Houston, the only Red Sox pitcher to ever record the win in the Midsummer Classic.

The Red Sox bolstered their lineup with a late March trade that brought Don Baylor from the Yankees in exchange for Mike Easler. Baylor hit a team-leading 31 home runs and was one of four Red Sox players with 94 or more RBIs. In addition, Wade Boggs won his second straight batting title with a .357 average.

Though the Red Sox sat in first place for most of the season, the team's front office didn't rest on its laurels and on August 19, the club traded with Seattle to get Dave Henderson and Spike Owen.

Clemens finished the season with a 24-4 record and 2.48 ERA, complemented by Bruce Hurst (13-8, 2.99 ERA) and Oil Can Boyd (16-10, 3.78 ERA). When the Red Sox clinched the division behind the Can's 12-3 win over the Blue Jays on September 28, Clemens rode around the field on a police horse in the midst of the celebration.

The Red Sox fell behind three games to one in the American League Championship Series against the California Angels, but staged a dramatic comeback in Game Five thanks to a clutch two-run, ninth inning home run by Henderson that staved off elimination. Hendu's sacrifice fly in the top of the 11th then plated the go-ahead run and the ALCS returned to Boston. Back home, the Red Sox closed out the Halos with a pair of blow-outs in Games Six and Seven, 10-4 and 8-1 victories.

Boston entered the World Series as a 2-1 underdog versus the New York Mets but they had chances to win throughout the series. Ultimately, the Red Sox lost Games Six and Seven despite leading both games and Bill Buckner's error in Game Six went out to haunt Red Sox fans for years to come.

The 1986 World Series

The 1986 World Series pegged the Red Sox as 2-1 underdogs against the New York Mets, who had won 108 games during the regular season. In Game One at Shea Stadium, Boston sent lefty Bruce Hurst to the mound against New York's Ron Darling. The game remained scoreless going into the seventh inning before Red Sox slugger Jim Rice drew a walk, moved to second base on a wild pitch and scored on an error by Mets' second baseman Tim Teufel. This miscue proved to be the difference-maker as Boston emerged with a 1-0 victory in Game One behind Hurst's four-hit effort.

Game Two starred pitching phenoms Roger Clemens and Doc Gooden, who had amassed regular season records of 24-4 and 17-6, respectively. However, the anticipated pitching duel never materialized and Boston's offense built a 6-2 advantage in support of Clemens, who was pulled after he put on the first two runners in the fifth inning. Still, the Red Sox bullpen minimized the damage and the team's offense padded the cushion in the late innings, sending the club to a 9-3 victory and a 2-0 lead in the series as the teams headed to Fenway Park.

Boston gave 16-game winner Oil Can Boyd the nod in Game Three but New York leadoff hitter Lenny Dykstra started the game with a home run and set the tone for a 7-1 Mets victory. Former Red Sox pitcher Bobby Ojeda picked up the win with a strong effort for New York.

Many expected the Red Sox to turn back to Bruce Hurst in Game Four but Boston skipper John McNamara chose Al Nipper instead. Nipper lasted six innings and yielded three runs, which proved to be enough for the Mets and starter Ron Darling, who prevailed 6-2 to even the series at two games apiece. Though it seemed like the home team couldn't win a game, Hurst reversed the trend in Game Five and dominated New York in a complete game 4-2 victory that put Boston one victory away from their first title in 68 years.

Game Six in New York began on a peculiar note when a parachutist landed on the mound in the top of the first inning with Boston's Bill Buckner standing at the plate. Boston starter Roger Clemens pitched no-hit ball through his first four frames and was leading 3-2 when he was removed for a pinch hitter in the top of the eighth. Red Sox reliever Calvin Schiraldi entered the game in Clemens' place but allowed the Mets to tie the score in the bottom of the inning. In the top of the 10th, a Dave Henderson leadoff home run, a Wade Boggs double and a Marty Barrett single put Boston ahead 5-3 with just three outs to go. After retiring the first two Mets hitters in the bottom half of the frame, Schiraldi, who had a 1.41 ERA in the regular season, surrendered three straight singles, cutting the Boston lead to a solitary run. Bob Stanley was brought in to preserve the win but the tying run scored on a wild pitch. What happened next has lived on in Red Sox infamy ever since: New York's Mookie Wilson hit a slow roller that scooted between first baseman Bill Buckner's legs, pushing across the Game Six-winning, World Series-tying run.

A day of rain after Game Six made it possible for Hurst to pitch on three days' rest in Game Seven and the Red Sox held a 3-0 lead through six innings. However, the Mets roared back with six unanswered runs against the Boston pitching staff, three off Hurst and three off Schiraldi. Though a Dwight Evans double in the eighth inning cut the lead to 6-5, the Mets countered with two insurance runs and held on for an 8-5, World Series-clinching victory. Red Sox fans were left in shock and bewilderment; their club had just dropped its fourth consecutive World Series Game Seven.

The 1986 Old-Timers game at Fenway Park paid tribute to the 40th anniversary of the Red Sox pennant-winning 1946 squad. The club also invited non-Red Sox alumni to participate for the first time. All three DiMaggio brothers - Red Sox legend Dominic, New York Yankee Hall of Famer Joe, and former Boston Brave Vince - showed up, as did Dom's longtime teammates and friends Bobby Doerr, Johnny Pesky and Ted Williams. The quartet was among 19 players from the mighty 1946 Boston team to return to Boston for the occasion.

1986 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

May 17 Old-Timers Game

1987

In 1987, the Red Sox celebrated the 75th anniversary of Fenway Park but the team had a difficult time repeating their success of the previous year. A new function facility named, "Diamond at Fenway," and a new souvenir store, "The Lansdowne Shop," were built in the Jeano Building and in the summer, Fenway Park hosted the last matchup between all-stars from the Cape Cod Baseball League and the Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League.

Record: 78-84, 5th in American League East
Manager: John F. McNamara
Attendance: 2,231,551

In 1987, the Red Sox embarked on a full year celebration of the 75th Anniversary of Fenway Park. It was the first time any ballclub had ever organized such an extensive celebration for the anniversary of the facility in which it played. The Red Sox developed the first ballpark anniversary logo in MLB history for the event, which was worn on Red Sox uniforms throughout the entire year and was used on special publications and commemorative merchandise. On April 20, 1987, the 75th anniversary of the ballpark's first regular season game, the Red Sox recreated pre-game ceremonies from that historic first game in 1912.

Despite plans for such a grand celebration of Fenway Park, the heartbreak of the 1986 World Series still clung to the hearts of Red Sox Nation and 1987 started with a pair of sour contract issues. Catcher Rich Gedman enjoyed a quality season in 1986 but didn't receive a single offer when he entered free agency. Gedman was more or less forced to re-sign with the Red Sox and couldn't even do that until May 1. It was later determined that Major League Baseball had engaged in collusion and Gedman, along with a number of other players ,received a settlement payment. Roger Clemens, meanwhile, walked out of spring training and demanded more money from the team as part of a holdout.

After a disappointing season-opening road trip, Bruce Hurst won the home opener with a 3-0, three-hitter. Clemens made his 1987 debut the following game and promptly surrendered four runs in four innings. When he was removed from the game, Clemens received hearty boos from the Fenway Park crowd who was still angry about the right-hander's holdout.

Clemens managed to turn his season around and won his second straight Cy Young award with a 20-9 record, seven shutouts and a 2.97 ERA. On the offensive side, Wade Boggs earned his fourth batting title with a .363 batting average and 200 hits and Dwight Evans supplied the power with career bests in home runs (34) and RBIs (123). The individual accolades were nice but the team fared poorly and couldn't even win half their games. After a title run the year before, the 1987 Red Sox slumped to a 78-84 record, leaving the club 20 games behind the first-place Tigers.

In 1987, a new function facility named, "Diamond at Fenway," and a new souvenir store, "The Lansdowne Shop," were built in the Jeano Building. The souvenir store would eventually become the Crown Royal Club (Absolut Club) in 2004 and the function facility, combined with the bowling alley below it, was turned into the restaurant Game On! in 2005.

An Old-Timers game celebrating Fenway Park's 75th Anniversary was held on May 23, with Cleveland Indians legend Bob Feller picking up the win for the "visiting" Equitable All-Stars team. In their final match-up at Fenway Park, the Cape Cod Baseball League All-Star team defeated the Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League All-Star team 10-1 in 1987. The Cape Cod team won six of the seven games it played against the Atlantic Collegiate squad at Fenway Park in the 1970s and 1980s, with the other game ending in a tie.

1987 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

May 23 Old-Timers Game

July 13 Cape Cod Baseball League 10, Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League 1*

 

* From 1975 to 1987, on a biennial basis, Fenway Park hosted an all-star game between the Cape Code Baseball League and the Atlantic Collegiate League. The all-star game alternated between Fenway Park and sites closer to the ACL's teams, such as Yankee Stadium and Veterans Stadium. In 1988, the Cape Cod Baseball League returned to an intra-league format for their annual all-star game and in 2009, Cape Code League All-Stars returned to Fenway Park for the Cape Cod League All-Star Game, which was played again in 2010.

1988

Fenway Park was the site of "Morgan Magic" in 1988, as interim skipper Joe Morgan sparked a dramatic, mid-season turnaround and the team made the playoffs. After a short postseason run, significant construction on a new press box and premium club commenced.

Record: 89-73, 1st in American League East
Manager: John F. McNamara (43-42), Joseph M. Morgan (46-31)
Attendance: 2,464,851
Postseason: Played in American League Championship Series

The 1988 season started nicely for the Red Sox and they stood at 14-6 by the end of April. However, the team began to slide and manager John McNamara lost his job at the All-Star break with his team just one game above .500.

Third-base coach Joe Morgan took over as interim manager and the team subsequently won their next 12 consecutive games. The club emerged victorious in 19 of its first 20 games under the new skipper, whose immediate success gave rise to the term "Morgan Magic." When Mike Boddicker beat the Tigers 16-4 at Fenway Park on August 13, the Red Sox set a league record with their 24th consecutive home victory.

The Red Sox reached first place on September 4 and stayed there for good. Wade Boggs won the batting title for the fourth consecutive year (.366), collecting 214 hits, 125 walks, and 128 runs scored. Left-fielder Mike Greenwell led the team in home runs (22) and RBIs (119) and batted .325 with an AL-record 23 game-winning hits in 1988.

Boston's pitching staff had two 18-game winners, Roger Clemens and Bruce Hurst, but no other Red Sox pitcher won more than nine games.

The Red Sox advanced to the playoffs and a best-of-seven ALCS against the Oakland A's but the result was nasty, brutish and short. The powerful A's swept Boston and former Boston pitcher Dennis Eckersley picked up the save in each game.

In 1988, a multicolored video board was installed in the center-field scoreboard, replacing the electronic message board that was built in 1976. On May 21, 1988, Bobby Doerr's # 1 was officially retired and joined Ted Williams' #9 and Joe Cronin's #4 on the façade of the right-field roof. Late in the 1988 season, the two-year process of creating a new premium seating area and new press box began with work on the supporting structural columns in the area behind home plate. After the season, the press box was gutted to make room for the new construction.

1989

The 600 Club debuted in 1989 and a new press offered more space for writers and broadcasters along with a control room for the park's video and scoreboards. On the field, the Red Sox couldn't recapture the magic of 1988 and finished with a disappointing 83 wins.

Record: 83-79, 3rd in American League East
Manager: Joseph M. Morgan
Attendance: 2,510,012

When the Red Sox lost four of their first five games, concerns about another letdown sprouted and fans hoped 1989 wouldn't be a repeat of 1987. Luckily, the team came alive to hold first place by Patriots Day and retained their grasp on the top spot for most of May.

However, by the third month of the regular season, momentum seemed to be going in the wrong direction. On June 4 the Red Sox led Toronto 10-0 after six innings at Fenway Park but the Blue Jays scored 11 runs in the last three innings. Boston eventually lost 13-11, and their 10-run lead was the largest squandered in club history. The Red Sox now stood 5½ games out of first place and "Morgan Magic" seemed nothing but a fond memory.

Wade Boggs led the team in hitting again and the third baseman became the first player in baseball history to record seven consecutive 200-hit seasons. His .330 average ranked third in the league but for the fifth year in a row Boggs led the league in on-base percentage. The main power sources on the club were Nick Esasky and Dwight Evans, who hit 30 and 20 home runs respectively, and each reached the 100-RBI plateau.

The Blue Jays won the division and the Red Sox finished in third place with an 83-79 record. The 1980s came to a conclusion and is the only decade in which neither the Yankees nor Red Sox won the World Series.

In 1989, a new premium seating area, the 600 Club, debuted at Fenway Park. The club, which was later renamed the .406 Club in honor of Ted Williams after his passing in 2002, was furnished with padded stadium club seats and enclosed in glass. A new press box was built on top of the 600 Club and the ramp leading to the former press box was closed off as part of construction. Near the closed off ramp, which remained as a dead ramp between Gate A and Gate D, an escalator was installed from Yawkey Way to the suite level and new 600 Club. In addition, a ramp at Gate D was constructed to replace the staircase that was built when the suites were installed in the early 1980s. Both these renovations improved access to the newly expanded upper levels of the Fenway Park.

On August 6, 1989, Carl Yastrzemski's #8 became the fourth Red Sox number to be officially retired at Fenway Park and was added to the façade of the right-field roof.