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‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎Fenway Park Timeline

1980_1989

1990-1999

1990

Propelled by Roger Clemens' outstanding season, the 1990 Red Sox stayed in the hunt throughout the year and clinched the American League East on the final day of the regular season, thanks to a diving catch by Tom Brunansky. But just as they had been in 1988, the Red Sox were swept by a superior Oakland team in the playoffs. During the summer, Fenway Park also hosted its first Baseball Beanpot, which featured the same four local colleges that battle for the Hockey Beanpot.

Record: 88-74, 1st in American League East
Manager: Joseph M. Morgan
Attendance: 2,528,986
Postseason: Played in American League Championship Series

In the early months of 1990, Red Sox Nation mourned the loss of Tony Conigliaro, who passed away on February 24 at age 45.

Roger Clemens had one of his best seasons, leading the league with a 1.93 ERA and winning 21 games. Clemens curiously finished second in the AL Cy Young voting to Oakland's Bob Welch, who won 27 games but sported an ERA more than a run higher than Clemens'.

Ellis Burks' 89 RBIs led an offense that wasn't particularly robust but the club's quality pitching and 88 victories were enough to win the AL East.

A couple of unusual moments stood out in a season in which the Red Sox scored just 35 more runs than they surrendered. On July 17 at Fenway Park, Boston hitters grounded into not one, but two triple plays, both 5-4-3 triple-killings initiated by the Twins' Gary Gaetti. On the first day of September, Mike Greenwell hit an inside-the-park grand slam in a 15-1 romp over New York.

On October 3, the Red Sox entered the final day of the regular season just one game up on Toronto. In the ninth inning against the White Sox with Boston leading 3-1, Chicago's Ozzie Guillen stepped to the plate with two outs and two runners on base. With the count full and the runners off at the pitch, Guillen hit a drive to right field. Red Sox right fielder Tom Brunansky's driving, sliding catch on the warning track by Pesky's Pole saved the win, ended the season and gave the Red Sox the AL East title.

Once again the Red Sox faced Oakland in the ALCS but another painful finish awaited the club. Boston dropped the first three games of the series and Clemens was ejected in Game Four after a confrontation with umpire Terry Cooney. The Red Sox lost Game Four 3-1, ending their 1990 season and extending the franchise's postseason winless streak to 10 games.

In 1990, the Red Sox clubhouse received a new weight room and multi-purpose room.

The first Baseball Beanpot was held at Fenway Park in 1990. Boston College vanquished Harvard in the championship game to win the first-ever Beanpot at Fenway Park.

1990 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

April 18 Boston College 4, Northeastern 1 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 18 Harvard 6, Boston University 0 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 19 Boston College 6, Harvard 3 (Beanpot Championship)*

April 19 Northeastern 12, Boston University 3 (Beanpot Consolation)*

May 19 Old-Timers Game

 

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.

1991

The Red Sox received a new weight room for their clubhouse in 1991 and were in the hunt for most of the 1991 season. However, after climbing to within half a game of first place on September 21, the team lost 11 of their final 14 contests and finished seven games back. The disappointing ending cost Joe Morgan his job as manager and ushered in a dispiriting stretch for the Red Sox in the early 1990s.

Record: 84-78, Tied for 2nd in American League East
Manager: Joseph M. Morgan
Attendance: 2,562,435

Looking to buttress the team's offense, the Red Sox signed 35-year-old Jack Clark prior to the 1991 season. Clark bounced back from an off-year in 1990 to lead the Red Sox in home runs (28) and RBIs (87) in 1991. Even with Clark's arrival Boston's offense slugged just 126 home runs.

A frightening moment struck the team on July 30 when reliever Jeff Gray, who was enjoying an excellent year with a 2.34 ERA in 61? innings, suffered a stroke in the Red Sox home clubhouse. Gray never played baseball again. That very evening, Carlos Quintana helped break a streak of nine consecutive home losses by hitting a grand slam and a two-run double in the third inning off Texas' Oil Can Boyd. Quintana's six RBIs in one inning tied the major-league record.

Roger Clemens won his third Cy Young Award in 1991, winning 18 games and leading the league in ERA (2.62) and strikeouts (241).

The Red Sox climbed to within half a game of first place on September 21 but then won only three of their final 14 contests to conclude the year seven games out of first.

Two days after the regular season ended, Joe Morgan was fired and replaced by former Red Sox third baseman Butch Hobson.

For the 1991 season, the Red Sox clubhouse received a new weight room and multi-purpose room. The club also renovated the ramps providing handicapped access in Sections 6, 32 and 42.

The 1991 Baseball Beanpot took place at Fenway Park in early May. Harvard would avenge its loss to Boston College the previous year in the 1990 Beanpot, defeating the Eagles in an extra-inning championship game. Nine days later, Fenway Park hosted another Old-Timers game that featured baseball legends Ted Williams and Joe DiMaggio.

1991 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

May 1 Harvard 15, Northeastern 1 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

May 1 Boston College 5, Boston University 1 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

May 2 Northeastern 11, Boston University 1 (Beanpot Consolation)*

May 2 Harvard 12, Boston College 9 (10 innings) (Beanpot Championship)*

May 11 Old-Timers Game

 

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.

1992

When Jean Yawkey passed away in early 1992, the Red Sox were left without a Yawkey figurehead for the first time in nearly seven decades. During the summer, the third annual Baseball Beanpot was played at Fenway Park and after the Red Sox lost 89 games during their season, they saw Wade Boggs depart at year's end.

Record: 73-89, 7th in American League East
Manager: Clell L. Hobson
Attendance: 2,468,574

1992 started ominously for the Red Sox when Carlos Quintana suffered a broken arm and right toe in a February car crash in Venezuela. The first baseman had been driving his brothers to the hospital after they were shot at a Carnival party. Quintana missed the entire season.

That same month Jean R. Yawkey passed away at the age of 83 and ownership was placed in the hands of the Yawkey Trust managed by John R. Harrington.

Free agent addition Frank Viola went 13-12 in his first year with the Red Sox. Roger Clemens was the only other Boston pitcher to win more games than he lost in 1992 (18-11) and his 2.41 ERA led the league for the third straight year.

Hitting proved to be an issue throughout the season for the Red Sox, as no batter posted an average above .276. Tom Brunansky and rookie Mo Vaughn, Quintana's replacement at first, generated most of the power but the club hit a mere 84 home runs, the team's lowest total since the World War II years.

The Red Sox alternated between fourth and fifth place most of the season but sank further in late August and September to finish dead last at 73-89.

With ideas about the "Curse of the Bambino" persisting, comedian "Father Guido Sarducci" held an exorcism at Fenway Park on September 24 and sprinkled holy water on the outside of the ballpark. Though he wasn't allowed into the park, the comedian declared that the 1993 Red Sox would win the World Series.

On a less comical note, Wade Boggs left Boston in December after 11 seasons in a Red Sox uniform, signing as a free agent with the New York Yankees.

In 1992, the Red Sox built portable enclosures for the bullpen benches and completely renovated both the home and away dugouts. The team also installed a metal-framed canvas awning above the roof box seats in 1992.

Boston College won the 1992 Baseball Beanpot at Fenway Park with victories over Harvard and Northeastern.

1992 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

April 21 Northeastern 6, Boston University 4 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 21 Boston College 5, Harvard 4 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 22 Harvard 14, Boston University 2 (Beanpot Consolation)*

April 22 Boston College 3, Northeastern 1 (Beanpot Championship)*

 

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.

1993

In 1993, the Red Sox began offering organized tours of Fenway Park, opening up "America's Most Beloved Ballpark" and making it one of Boston's most popular tourist destinations. The ballpark also welcomed back the Baseball Beanpot for the fourth consecutive year while the Red Sox had another subpar season.

Record: 80-82, 5th in American League East
Manager: Clell L. Hobson
Attendance: 2,422,021

The Red Sox opened 1993 with their first spring training in Fort Myers, FL. After suffering through a powerless 1992 season, the Red Sox signed 38-year-old Andre Dawson, who delivered 13 home runs, 67 RBIs and a .273 average for Boston. First baseman Mo Vaughn took a big step forward in his third major league season, amassing 29 homers and 101 RBIs. But consistent run-scoring was a problem again and the offense scored just 686 runs.

Boston's pitching staff didn't produce many positive results either. Roger Clemens suffered through his first losing season with an 11-14 record and Danny Darwin led the staff at 15-11.

The Red Sox held first place for the first 17 games but fell all the way to fifth place by the All-Star Break. A post-break winning streak of 10 games brought the Red Sox to first place again and though they stayed close through the middle of August, the club finished the season losing 31 of their final 47 games.

Greg Harris pitched a club-record 80 games out of the bullpen, though the ambidextrous pitcher made all his appearances as a right-hander and didn't get a chance to throw from the portside in 1993.

On November 23, Haywood Sullivan sold his share in the team to the Yawkey Trust for $12 million, turning a tidy profit since Sullivan initially bought into the team with $1 million loaned to him by Jean Yawkey.

In 1993, two technological advances were installed at Fenway Park. That year, Shawmut Bank installed Fenway Park's first ATM and a 350-square foot telephone equipment room was added on the third-base side of the roof, with a mounted antenna.

Boston College captured its third Baseball Beanpot at Fenway Park in four years in April 1993. The following month, Negro League legends were honored at the park as part of the 1993 Old-Timers game.

1993 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

April 21 Boston College 8, Northeastern 7 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 21 Harvard 14, Boston University 1 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 22 Boston College 14, Harvard 5 (Beanpot Championship)*

May 29 Old-Timers Game

 

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.

In 1993, organized tours of Fenway Park began. Since then, Fenway Park has become one of Boston's most visited landmarks.

1994

In a strike-shortened season, the Red Sox and the rest of baseball missed out on postseason play. Boston never seriously contended during the truncated season and Fenway Park sat quiet after the players went on strike in early August.

Record: 54-61, 4th in American League East
Manager: Clell L. Hobson
Attendance: 1,775,818

The Red Sox hired 35-year-old Dan Duquette as the team's new general manager in January 1994. At the time if made him the youngest GM in Red Sox history.

Entering the 1994 season, the American League was divided into three divisions and a Wild Card team was added to the playoffs. Unfortunately, baseball never saw a 1994 postseason because of a strike that began on August 10.

In Boston's home opener, Roger Clemens gave up eight runs in 4? innings to visiting Detroit but Boston rallied and Otis Nixon scored the winning run on a passed ball.

From June 3 through June 19 the Red Sox went 1-15. Any hopes for the season were essentially ended, though the second half did have its interesting moments.

On July 8 at Fenway Park, shortstop John Valentin became the second Red Sox player to turn an unassisted triple play after snagging a line drive, stepping on second base and tagging the runner in the top of the sixth. In the bottom half of the frame Valentin hit a home run to lead the Red Sox to a 4-3 victory over Seattle.

Another Boston/Seattle series in late July that was originally scheduled to be played in Seattle had to be moved to Fenway Park because of repairs to the Mariners' Kingdome. The Red Sox put last-minute tickets on sale at old-fashioned prices and batted last in all four games, despite being "the away team."

Butch Hobson finished the year with his third consecutive losing record and was fired in September. Kevin Kennedy took Hobson's place in the managerial seat.

The Colorado Silver Bullets, a touring all-women's baseball team, visited Fenway Park in 1994 but fell to a Boston Park League All-Star team, 6-0. Earlier in the year, Northeastern University took home the 5th Annual Baseball Beanpot.

1994 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

April 26 Northeastern 4, Harvard 1 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 26 Boston University 9, Boston College 4 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 27 Harvard 7, Boston College 7 (Tie) (Beanpot Consolation)*

April 27 Northeastern 10, Boston University 3 (Beanpot Championship)*

July 21 Boston Park League All-Stars 6, Colorado Silver Bullets 0

 

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.

1995

While the previous few seasons had seen little go right, everything seemed to click for the Red Sox in 1995. Mo Vaughn had an MVP season and new addition Tim Wakefield led the rotation. The team's run of luck ended in the playoffs however, as the juggernaut Cleveland Indians quickly dispatched the Red Sox in the ALDS.

Record: 86-58, 1st in American League East
Manager: Kevin C. Kennedy
Attendance: 2,164,410
Postseason: Played in American League Division Series

The baseball strike, which began in August 1994, lingered through the first month of the 1995 season and the 1995 schedule was shortened to 144 games. On a belated Opening Day at Fenway Park on April 26, Aaron Sele threw a 9-0, two-hitter against the Twins. Due to the strike, only 12 exhibition games with the regular players took place before the start of the season.

With the rules regarding signings up in the air due to the ongoing strike, Dan Duquette had secured agreements with starting pitcher Kevin Appier, reliever John Wetteland and slugger Sammy Sosa in January, but these deals were nullified when the National Labor Relations Board intervened in the strike and re-established the pre-existing system.

Though they lost Appier, Wetteland and Sosa, Boston picked up two players who were reelased by their previous teams: outfielder Troy O'Leary and first baseman-turned-pitcher Tim Wakefield.

In Wakefield's third start, the knuckleballer tossed a 10-inning, complete game victory over Seattle at Fenway Park. By August 13, Wakefield's record stood at 14-1 and Boston was well on its way to winning the Eastern Division. From May 13 on, the Red Sox claimed sole possession of first place and eventually finished the year with a dramatically-improved record of 86-58.

Mo Vaughn hit 39 home runs and a league-leading 126 RBIs on his way to the AL MVP. Complementing the big first baseman was John Valentin, who collected 27 HRs, 102 RBIs and a .298 average. Wakefield led the team in wins and ERA (16-8, 2.95) and Erik Hanson went 15-5.

Under wild card playoff format, Boston faced Cleveland in the Division Series, a best-of-five round. Unfortunately the series was a short one and the Red Sox were swept at the hands of the powerful Indians. Fenway Park hosted just one post-season game in 1995.

In 1995 the club also established the Red Sox Hall of Fame. The inaugural class of Red Sox Hall of Famers included some of the biggest names in team history, while subsequent elections (held on a biennial basis) have recognized legendary players, coaches, executives and broadcasters who have called Fenway Park home.

In 1995, a re-measurement yielded a new, reduced distance from home plate to the base of the left-field foul pole. The new distance of 310 feet was five less than the previous official distance of 315 feet.

In addition, Boston Edison Company installed energy efficient lighting, heating, cooling and control systems throughout Fenway Park.

For the second year in a row, the Northeastern Huskies won the Baseball Beanpot at Fenway Park in April 1995.

1995 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

April 18 Northeastern 5, Boston University 3 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 18 Boston College 12, Harvard 3 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 20 Northeastern 7, Boston College 3 (Beanpot Championship)*

April 20 Boston University 7, Harvard 1 (Beanpot Consolation)*

 

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.

1996

As it's so often happened in Fenway Park and Red Sox history, the surprise success of 1995 was followed by a disappointing encore campaign by the team. Manager Kevin Kennedy lost his job after an 85-77 season and Roger Clemens left via free agency at year's end. The University of Massachusetts won the 1996 Baseball Beanpot at Fenway Park in their first year playing in the tournament.

Record: 85-77, 3rd in American League East
Manager: Kevin C. Kennedy
Attendance: 2,315,231

The big addition to the 1996 Red Sox roster was right-hander Tom Gordon. After a season-opening road trip, Boston returned to Fenway with a 1-5 record and had their home opener postponed due to snow. Gordon picked up a 9-1 victory in the rescheduled opener but Boston was six games out of first by April 12.

John Valentin provided one of the season's highlights when he hit for the cycle on June 6 at Fenway Park. Valentin remains the most recent Red Sox player to accomplish this feat.

Roger Clemens led the league with 257 strikeouts but his record stood at a modest 10-13 by season's end. From 1993 through 1996 Clemens compiled a record of 40-39 but on September 18, 1996, he repeated his 20-strikeout feat from 10 years earlier against Detroit. This time he did so without walking a single batter.

The Red Sox ended the year in third place with an 85-77 record. The day after the season concluded, the Red Sox fired Kevin Kennedy

During the offseason, Clemens filed for free agency and signed a lucrative deal with Toronto.

With Boston University dropping its baseball program, the University of Massachusetts took BU's place and won the 1996 Baseball Beanpot at Fenway Park. UMass defeated the two-time defending champions from Northeastern in a 1-0 pitchers' duel in the title game.

1996 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

April 18 Northeastern 9, Boston College 5 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 18 University of Massachusetts 13, Harvard 2 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 23 University of Massachusetts 1, Northeastern 0 (Beanpot Championship)*

 

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.

1997

On April 22, UMass pitcher Scott Barnsby threw a no-hitter against Northeastern in their semi-final matchup in the Basebll Beanpot. It was the first no-hitter at Fenway Park since Dave Morehead's in 1965. Before the 1997 season, three giant Coke bottles were added to one of the left-field light towers above the Green Monster and during the season, the Fenway crowd was introduced to rookie sensation Nomar Garciaparra.

Record: 78-84, 4th in American League East
Manager: James F. Williams
Attendance: 2,226,136

Nomar Garciaparra debuted for the Red Sox in 1997 and earned the AL Rookie of the Year award in a unanimous vote. Leading off and playing shortstop, Garciaparra became the first rookie in history to hit over .300, slug 30 home runs, collect more than 90 RBIs and steal over 20 stolen bases. His 30-game hitting streak in August also set a rookie record.

Roger Clemens had departed over the winter and left a vacuum in the rotation. After the team started the season with eight games on the road, new southpaw Steve Avery pitched the home opener at Fenway Park and allowed Seattle just one earned run through five innings. However, the Mariners eventually pulled out a 5-4 victory. Clemens returned to Fenway Park in July as a member of the Blue Jays and struck out 16 Boston hitters in a 3-1 Toronto victory.

The Red Sox never mounted much of a threat, though they did post a 6-3 record against NL teams in the first year of interleague play.

While the season was an uneventful one, the Red Sox completed two seminal trades in 1997. At the late July trading deadline, the Red Sox sent struggling reliever Heathcliff Slocumb to Seattle, acquiring minor leaguers Jason Varitek and Derek Lowe. During the offseason, the team acquired NL Cy Young Award winner Pedro Martinez from the Montreal Expos, surrendering Carl Pavano and a player to be named later (Tony Armas Jr.).

In March 1997, a giant 25-foot Coca-Cola bottle was attached to one of the light towers above the Green Monster. Less than two weeks later, two more Coke bottles were added. They remained prominent fixtures of the ballpark until they were taken down in 2008.

In April 1997, Jackie Robinson's number 42 was officially retired across Major League Baseball on the 50th anniversary of when he broke the color barrier. Today, Robinson's blue #42 can be seen alongside the numbers of Red Sox legends on the right-field roof façade.

The batting cage under the center-field bleacher seats, which was built in 1971, underwent renovations in May 1997. Today, this area is home to the Bleacher Bar restaurant.

For the second year in a row, the University of Massachusetts team was crowned champion of the Baseball Beanpot at Fenway Park. On April 22, in UMass pitcher Scott Barnsby pitched a no-hitter against Northeastern in their semi-final matchup. It was the first no-hitter at Fenway Park since Dave Morehead's in 1965.

1997 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

April 22 University of Massachusetts 1, Northeastern 0 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 22 Harvard 9, Boston College 2 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 24 University of Massachusetts 11, Harvard 4 (Beanpot Championship)*

 

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.

1998

Acquired over the previous offseason, right-hander Pedro Martinez electrified the Fenway Park crowd like few others before him. With Martinez dominating every fifth day, the Red Sox earned a Wild Card berth but were bounced once again by the Indians in the ALDS.

Record: 92-70, 2nd in American League East (Wild Card)
Manager: James F. Williams
Attendance: 2,343,947
Postseason: Played in American League Division Series

In Fenway Park's 1998 home opener, Seattle's Randy Johnson struck out 15 Boston hitters through eight innings and left with a 7-2 lead. Undeterred, the Red Sox staged a furious comeback against Seattle closer and former teammate Heathcliff Slocumb in the bottom of the ninth and ended the game on a Mo Vaughn walk-off grand slam. Vaughn had endured a tumultuous offseason after his involvement in a January auto accident but all was forgotten when the first baseman hit the slam. As Vaughn circled the bases, the Fenway PA system began playing The Standells' "Dirty Water," which quickly became a Fenway Park tradition. The song is still played after every Red Sox home win.

Pedro Martinez pitched his first game in Fenway Park the following afternoon and struck out 12 in a two-hit, complete game shut out. As the year progressed, more and more Dominican flags appeared at Fenway Park. Martinez went 19-7 with a 2.89 ERA and 251 strikeouts in first season with the Red Sox.

A fully-healthy Bret Saberhagen contributed a 15-8 season and Tim Wakefield went 17-8. Tom Gordon became the closer and saved 46 games in 1998.

The Red Sox finished well behind the 114-win Yankees in the AL East but the team qualified for the Wild Card and earned an American League Division Series matchup with the Indians.

After losing 13 consecutive postseason games, the Red Sox finally broke the streak with an 11-3 victory over Cleveland in Game One. However they promptly lost the next three games and were eliminated from playoff competition.

Due to uncooperative weather, the 1998 Baseball Beanpot didn't have a tournament winner. Harvard and the University of Massachusetts won their semi-final games and were ready to meet up in the championship on April 23, but rain forced a postponement and the game was eventually cancelled. In late June, a team of Massachusetts High School All-Stars beat a collection of Connecticut High School All-Stars, 2-1.

1998 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

April 21 Harvard 11, Northeastern 0 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 21 University of Massachusetts 7, Boston College 2 (Beanpot Semi-Finals)*

April 23 Boston College 9, Northeastern 8 (7 innings) (Beanpot Consolation)*

June 24 Massachusetts High School All-Stars 2, Connecticut High School All-Stars 1

 

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.

1999

Fenway Park hosted its third MLB All-Star Game in 1999, a midsummer classic highlighted by Ted Williams' final appearance at the park and Pedro Martinez's throttling of the National League All-Star lineup. In anticipation for the game, the team installed temporary press boxes on the first and third-base sides of Fenway Park's roof, which were converted into suites after the game. The Red Sox capped this special Fenway Park season by reaching the playoffs and beating the Indians in an exciting ALDS, before losing to the Yankees in the American League Championship Series.

Record: 94-68, 2nd in American League East (Wild Card)
Manager: James F. Williams
Attendance: 2,446,162
Postseason: Won American League Division Series

Pedro Martinez had a season for the ages in 1999 with a 23-4 record, 2.07 ERA, and 313/37 strikeout to walk ratio. Martinez earned the AL Cy Young Award for his efforts and finished second in the MVP race.

The Red Sox started the season 5-0 on the road, and then won their home opener behind a Bret Saberhagen 6-0 shutout of the White Sox.

Nomar Garciaparra had an outstanding year in his third full season in Boston, highlighted by his remarkable performance at Fenway Park on May 10. That day, Garciaparra hit three home runs (two of which were grand slams) and drove in 10 runs, tying Fred Lynn's club record of 10 RBIs in one game.

Five days later, the Red Sox announced plans for a new Fenway Park to be built across the street from the existing stadium, but uncertainty remained about how the new park would be financed.

In July, Fenway Park hosted its third Major League Baseball All-Star Game. Ted Williams made a poignant, final appearance at the park during pregame ceremonies before Pedro Martinez dominated the National League's top hitters in the game itself. Martinez was named All-Star Game MVP after striking out five of the six batters he faced.

The Red Sox remained in second place for most of the season and clinched a playoff berth against with Cleveland in a rematch of the previous season's ALDS. In the series, the teams split the first four games to set up a winner-take-all finale. In the deciding game, Troy O'Leary hit a grand slam and a three-run home run and Pedro Martinez pitched six no-hit innings in relief to secure the victory. The Red Sox advanced to the ALCS and fought gamely against the Yankees but managed just one victory (behind a strong Martinez performance in Game Three) before being eliminated.

With Fenway Park set to host the 1999 All-Star Game, improvements to the home and visiting clubhouses were completed shortly before the start of the season. Temporary press boxes were also installed on the left-field and right-field roofs in anticipation of the Midsummer Classic. After the All-Star Game, the boxes would become the K and B suites at the ballpark.

Fenway Park showcased one of the most memorable All-Star weeks in baseball history in 1999. On July 12, a star-studded home run derby was highlighted by the memorable performances of sluggers like Ken Griffey Jr., Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa. Griffey defeated Milwaukee's Jeromy Burnitz in the final round to win the derby crown. The following night, Red Sox legend Ted Williams made his final public appearance at Fenway Park during the All-Star game's pregame ceremonies. Introduced as "the greatest hitter of all time," Williams was showered with a standing ovation and the enthusiastic greetings of both All-Star teams, as players like Nomar Garciaparra and Tony Gwynn surrounded Williams at the pitcher's mound before he threw out the ceremonial first pitch. It was one of the most poignant moments in the ballpark's history and set the stage for the dominant performance of Sox right-hander Pedro Martinez, who struck out five of six National League batters in two innings of work. For his efforts, Martinez was named All-Star Game MVP in a 4-1 American League victory.

1999 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

April 29 Boston College 4, University of Massachusetts 2 (Beanpot Championship)*

April 29 Harvard 7, Northeastern 1 (Beanpot Consolation)*

July 11 All-Star Futures Game: World 7, United States 0

July 12 MLB Home Run Derby: National League 39, American League 23

July 13 MLB All-Star Game: American League 4, National League 1

 

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.