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Cubs Scholars

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Education empowers communities. Providing children and young adults with the support and resources needed to excel in school creates a positive learning environment and opens a wealth of opportunities for our next generation of leaders. The Cubs support citywide programs that promote education and college persistence.

The Cubs Scholars program, launched in 2013, offers Chicago inner-city high school students financial contributions and a team-sponsored mentorship program designed to promote academic achievement and post-secondary educational advancement. Cubs Scholars are high-potential students with demonstrated need. Each recipient receives a $20,000 scholarship upon their enrollment in a four-year college or university and participates in a mentoring program with help from Cubs College Prep. The mentoring program helps prepare scholars for the transition from high school to college. The Cubs College Prep programming and mentoring from Cubs associates helps each scholar continue toward college graduation. Students are recommended for Cubs Scholars by Cubs Charities nonprofit partners.

In 2019, the program welcomed its seventh class of Cubs Scholars.

2019 Scholars

  • Alexandra Alanis – Nicholas Senn High School
  • Abari Davis – De La Salle Institute
  • Junbin Huang – Walter Payton College Preparatory High School
  • Alexandra Nevarez – Lake View High School
  • Alejandra Palafox – Solorio Academy High School
  • Marcos Sandoval – Nicholas Senn High School
  • Brina Taylor – George Westinghouse College Prep
  • De’Andre Wilbor – Westinghouse College Prep

2018 Scholars

  • Anthony Guy – Tusculum University
  • De'Janae Phillips – North Central College
  • Lirio Romero – Coe College
  • Sean Wright – University of Illinois-Champaign-Urbana
  • Javionna Williams – Agnes Scott College

For more information, contact [email protected].

Since 2013, Cubs Charities has committed more than $760,000 to students in Chicago.