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Price, Kimbrel headline new Red Sox

Elias, Smith and Young round out list of offseason additions
MLB.com @IanMBrowne

As MLB.com's Spring Training primer continues, it's time to introduce all the new faces on the Red Sox. After a highly productive offseason by president of operations Dave Dombrowski, there are plenty of reasons to be excited.

The pitching staff has a new ace, a new closer and a new setup man. The bench has a new power bat.

As MLB.com's Spring Training primer continues, it's time to introduce all the new faces on the Red Sox. After a highly productive offseason by president of operations Dave Dombrowski, there are plenty of reasons to be excited.

The pitching staff has a new ace, a new closer and a new setup man. The bench has a new power bat.

Spring Training preview Part I: Red Sox hope several rebound from down 2015

"You always set priorities in what you're trying to do. I think if you're aggressive, you can try to get things done," Dombrowski said. "This year fell into place better than some others. It worked out well."

Here are the new guys, in alphabetical order:

LHP Roenis Elias: Lost in the excitement of the Dec. 7 trade that brought Carson Smith to the Red Sox is that Dombrowski got another nice piece from the Mariners in Elias, who is capable of helping in the rotation and the bullpen. With Boston's starting rotation already full, the best chance Elias has of making the club out of Spring Training is as a reliever. Of his 51 appearances for Seattle the past two years, 49 have been starts, but the Red Sox are confident his stuff can also play well out of the 'pen. Elias still has Minor League options, meaning he can provide organizational starting depth.

RHP Craig Kimbrel: Heading into the offseason, Dombrowski downplayed what type of reliever he might acquire, simply saying he was looking for someone who could close games if something happened to Koji Uehara. Then, he went out and acquired one of the premier closers in the game in Kimbrel. Uehara expressed no hesitation at sliding over to the setup role, and the Red Sox now have one of the best late-relief duos in the game. Kimbrel not only has elite stuff, but he feeds off adrenaline, which makes him a great fit for Boston.

Video: SF@SD: Kimbrel retires Posey to escape jam in the 9th

LHP David Price: After deciding not to have a bona-fide ace in 2015, the Red Sox reversed course in dramatic fashion by signing Price to a seven-year, $217 million contract that includes an opt out clause after the third season. Boston is thrilled to add someone with Price's combination of ability, experience, durability and leadership. The lefty should be a lock for 15-plus wins and over 200 innings. Price changes the outlook of the entire rotation.

RHP Carson Smith: Once the Red Sox acquired Price, they had an overflow of starting pitching, which enabled them trade lefty Wade Miley to the Mariners for Smith and Elias. Smith had a dominant rookie season in Seattle, striking out 92 batters over 70 innings and posting a 2.31 ERA. The sidewinder will mainly be used in the sixth and seventh innings, but he also has the ability to pitch later in the game if needed. Don't be surprised if manager John Farrell frequently brings him in to strike one a tough righty to get out of a jam.

OF Chris Young: Though Young will be listed on the depth chart as a reserve, he will be in the lineup against every lefty starter. The right-handed hitter mashes southpaws. Last year, Young hit .327 with seven homers, 24 RBIs and a .972 OPS against lefties. In 73 career plate appearances at Fenway, he is a .344 hitter with three homers, 12 RBIs and a 1.054 OPS. Young's defensive versatility will also help the Red Sox, as he can play all three outfield positions.

Ian Browne is a reporter for MLB.com.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Boston Red Sox, Craig Kimbrel, David Price