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Breaking down Marlins' haul for Stanton

Flame-throwing right-hander Guzman headlines Miami's return
MLB.com @JimCallisMLB

When the Marlins and new CEO Derek Jeter started exploring deals for Giancarlo Stanton this offseason, it was clear that the combination of his no-trade clause and $295 million contract was going to limit the possible destinations. And with Stanton's preference to be dealt to a small number of teams, the Marlins' leverage was diminished, which explains why the prospect haul they're reported to be receiving from the Yankees is less than you might expect for the reigning National League MVP, who is coming off a 59-homer season at age 27.

Stanton will make at least $295 million over the next 10 seasons unless he opts out of his contract after 2020, and that's probably less than he'd command on the open market, at least in terms of average annual value. But in exchange for sending Stanton to the Yankees -- along with $30 million toward his contract if he doesn't opt out in three years -- all Miami is set to receive in return is Starlin Castro and two prospects: right-hander Jorge Guzman and shortstop Jose Devers, according to MLB Network Insider Joel Sherman.

When the Marlins and new CEO Derek Jeter started exploring deals for Giancarlo Stanton this offseason, it was clear that the combination of his no-trade clause and $295 million contract was going to limit the possible destinations. And with Stanton's preference to be dealt to a small number of teams, the Marlins' leverage was diminished, which explains why the prospect haul they're reported to be receiving from the Yankees is less than you might expect for the reigning National League MVP, who is coming off a 59-homer season at age 27.

Stanton will make at least $295 million over the next 10 seasons unless he opts out of his contract after 2020, and that's probably less than he'd command on the open market, at least in terms of average annual value. But in exchange for sending Stanton to the Yankees -- along with $30 million toward his contract if he doesn't opt out in three years -- all Miami is set to receive in return is Starlin Castro and two prospects: right-hander Jorge Guzman and shortstop Jose Devers, according to MLB Network Insider Joel Sherman.

A four-time All-Star, Castro is a good-not-great regular, but he will cost the Marlins at least $22 million over the next two seasons unless they spin him off somewhere else to further cut costs. Guzman does have huge upside, but he also comes with a lot of risk as a pitcher who has yet to throw an inning in full-season ball. Devers hasn't played above Rookie ball and can't even crack MLBPipeline.com's Marlins Top 30 Prospects list.

Miami reportedly worked out more advantageous trades from a talent standpoint with both the Cardinals and Giants, but Stanton vetoed both deals. That was his right, and he used it to force the Marlins to send him to a destination he desired.

In addition to financial relief, the key to the Marlins' return is Guzman, who got traded for the second straight offseason. He signed with the Astros out of the Dominican Republic in 2014 and came to New York along with fellow righty Albert Abreu last November in a deal for Brian McCann. Guzman spent 2017 at short-season Staten Island, going 5-3 with a 2.30 ERA and leading the New York-Penn League in strikeouts (88) and placing fifth in ERA (2.30) and WHIP (1.04).

Guzman, 21, throws harder than most Minor League starters with a fastball that usually ranges from 97-103 mph. He backs it up with a power slider and a changeup, though both pitches still have a long way to develop. While he has a history of wildness, he did cut his walk rate from 4.4 per nine innings in two years in the Astros system to 2.4 in his lone season with the Yankees.

The younger brother of Red Sox rookie sensation Rafael Devers, Jose signed for $250,000 out of the Dominican Republic in 2016. He batted .245/.336/.342 with 16 steals in 53 games between two Rookie-level clubs this summer at age 17, showing solid speed and shortstop actions. He makes contact but will have to add strength to make an impact with the bat.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.