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Moore bitten by Judge's moonshot

MLB.com @gregjohnsmlb

SEATTLE -- Andrew Moore has already given up nine home runs in his first 30 innings in the Majors, but none quite like the one Aaron Judge launched in the fifth inning of Friday's 5-1 loss to the Yankees.

As the Mariners' rookie right-hander goes through the learning curve of becoming a Major League starter, there will be more balls hit over walls. It's part of the game. But Judge nearly knocked one out of the stadium, reaching the top row of the second deck in left field on a shot so high that Statcast™ didn't register it.

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SEATTLE -- Andrew Moore has already given up nine home runs in his first 30 innings in the Majors, but none quite like the one Aaron Judge launched in the fifth inning of Friday's 5-1 loss to the Yankees.

As the Mariners' rookie right-hander goes through the learning curve of becoming a Major League starter, there will be more balls hit over walls. It's part of the game. But Judge nearly knocked one out of the stadium, reaching the top row of the second deck in left field on a shot so high that Statcast™ didn't register it.

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"I definitely would like to have that one back," Moore said. "I thought I commanded the fastball pretty well tonight and the curveball had some life. But it was just that curveball got a little bit away, and he does damage on pitches like that. I'd definitely like to have that one back."

Video: Must C Crushed: Judge obliterates 31st home run

Moore, the Mariners' No. 3 prospect per MLBPipeline.com, fell to 1-2 with a 5.70 ERA. He's been bitten by the long ball eight times in his last four starts, which is clearly something that the 23-year-old will need to change if he's going to have success at this level.

"No doubt," Mariners manager Scott Servais acknowledged. "Andrew does have a fastball that rides up in the zone. In this league, when you make mistakes with the ball up, these are big, strong guys and they can hit it a little farther than they do in the Minor Leagues. He is going to give up a few.

"We have some other guys, we have fly-ball pitchers, a number of them on our club. And when you're not hitting your location and get behind in the count at all, sometimes they go out of the ballpark."

Moore doesn't have overpowering stuff, he relies on command and a nice assortment of offspeed offerings. But he needs to locate well, and some of his mistakes have been loud.

"I pitch up in the zone, and guys have hit mistakes here," Moore said. "A lot of them have been offspeed. It's just part of the game. You have to get a new ball and go after it."

Moore threw quality starts his first three outings, allowing three runs in each start while going seven, eight and six innings. But he's allowed five runs in back-to-back starts, including a three-inning outing last week in Chicago.

"Andrew is learning," Servais said. "I still like how he goes about it. He made a couple mistakes tonight, and it cost us. When you're playing good teams like that, the games are going to be tight and one mistake here or there, a bad pitch here or there can really hurt."

Video: NYY@SEA: Servais on Moore's outing in loss to Yankees

Moore said he didn't hurry back in to watch video of Judge's blast, figuring seeing it once was enough.

"I saw it went over," he said. "That's all. It's three runs and just get back to work."

But he has quickly learned that the margin for error at the big league level is a lot slimmer than the Minors after rapidly progressing from Double-A Arkansas and Triple-A Tacoma this year.

"Definitely, especially with offspeed and how aggressive teams have been against me." Moore said. "If you make mistakes, a lot of times they don't come back, especially with middle-of-the-order guys like that. The margin for error is pretty small and you have to execute pitches. I just didn't make good pitches there."

Greg Johns has covered the Mariners since 1997, and for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB.

Seattle Mariners, Andrew Moore