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Urena shows promise, then runs into big inning

After using fastball, slurve effectively in scoreless 4th, righty allows 4 runs in 5th
"I'd just like to see him limit damage," Don Mattingly said of Jose Urena (AP).
March 14, 2017

JUPITER, Fla. -- As swiftly as Jose Urena breezed through the fourth inning on Tuesday, the fifth slipped away from the right-hander just as fast. Seemingly in a snap, the 25-year-old was tagged for six runs in 2 2/3 innings in the Marlins' 7-1 loss to the Tigers at Roger

JUPITER, Fla. -- As swiftly as Jose Urena breezed through the fourth inning on Tuesday, the fifth slipped away from the right-hander just as fast. Seemingly in a snap, the 25-year-old was tagged for six runs in 2 2/3 innings in the Marlins' 7-1 loss to the Tigers at Roger Dean Stadium.
The tale of two innings is what has befuddled the Marlins' organization, which sees so much promise in Urena. Yet the results haven't always matched his raw talent.
"We kind of see the same, the power stuff," manager Don Mattingly said. "[Then] they get on his fastball pretty good."

The fifth-inning collapse broke the game open for the Tigers, who led by a run entering the inning. Urena gave up successive singles to Dixon Machado and Anthony Gose. He fell behind in the count to J.D. Martinez, who hit an RBI double.
After getting ahead of Justin Upton, 1-2, the big blast of the game followed. Upton worked the count full and crushed a changeup over the wall in left field for a three-run homer.
In the sixth inning, Gose had a two-run double off Urena.
"I'd just like to see him limit damage," Mattingly said. "It seems like it's big. When it gets rolling, you want him to be able to shut it off earlier. Just change speeds enough to get them off his fastball."
Out of Minor League options, Urena has the inside edge of making the Marlins' roster as a long reliever or perhaps even a starter. But the club is hopeful of better results.
On Tuesday, he was simply dominant in the fourth inning, retiring the side in order, including striking out Dominic Ficociello with an 89-mph "slurve." His fastball topped at 97 mph in the inning.
The difference in the fifth inning was that Urena got into bad pitcher's counts, and he didn't have success with his offspeed pitches to keep hitters honest.
"You're going to give up runs," Mattingly said. "Everybody is going to give up runs. You'd like to see him limit the damage, keep it at one or two, where the game stays manageable for us, and not have the big inning."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast.