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Goldy flashes All-Star form in latest 2-HR game

D-backs first baseman now 13-for-18 in past four games
MLB.com @SteveGilbertMLB

DENVER -- Given his cold start to the season, it was inevitable that D-backs first baseman Paul Goldschmidt was going to heat up, and boy, is he scorching right now.

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DENVER -- Given his cold start to the season, it was inevitable that D-backs first baseman Paul Goldschmidt was going to heat up, and boy, is he scorching right now.

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Goldschmidt hit a pair of homers in Arizona's 12-7 comeback win on Saturday, giving him four in two days at Coors Field.

"I was able to put a couple of good swings on those balls," Goldschmidt said. "Second one, maybe a little Coors Field home run, but I'll take it. Just trying to have good at-bats. It's a good win."

Goldschmidt's first homer traveled a projected 450 feet to right-center field, making it the longest opposite-field homer by a right-handed batter since Statcast™ started tracking in 2015.

His second clout was a three-run shot in the fourth inning, again off Rockies starter Chad Bettis. It wasn't as prolific as his first homer, traveling 354 feet down the left-field line. It did have a launch angle of 46 degrees, though, which is tied for the highest in the Majors this year.

Entering Saturday, only 16 homers tracked by Statcast™ (since 2015) had a launch angle that high. It wasn't a personal milestone for Goldschmidt, though. He had a 47-degree shot May 4, 2017, in Washington.

Video: ARI@COL: Goldschmidt powers 2 homers at Coors Field

Goldschmidt entered the game leading all National League players since May 23 in slugging percentage (.827) and OPS (1.275) with a minimum of 50 plate appearances. The five-time NL All-Star is 13-for-18 over his last four games.

Goldschmidt's average has gone from .198 on May 22 to .250 after Saturday's game.

"My confidence is always the same," Goldschmidt said. "I was just able to come through today and yesterday and for a few days. There was a while where I wasn't. It wasn't like I lost confidence. Just wasn't executing, and that's part of the game. There's a lot of failure in this game. I've said it for a few days, that just because I had a few good days, it doesn't mean it's going to continue. Just try to keep putting the work in and go out there and play well."

In the ninth, Goldschmidt was hit by a 93-mph fastball from Brooks Pounders in his side. The normally reserved Goldschmidt had some words for catcher Tony Wolters as he made his way to first.

"It's part of the game," Goldschmidt said while declining to share what he told Wolters.

Goldschmidt's teammates were clearly not happy with the situation, and a few let Pounders know about it from the dugout, including reliever Archie Bradley, who pitched the bottom of the eighth.

"It's our guy," Bradley said. "He's hit two homers. It was just kind of bush league, in my opinion. Even if you are setting up inside, you're a big league pitcher, a big league catcher, you kind of know the intent of what you're doing. Not in a retaliation, but you're upset. He's our guy, and when our guy gets hit you want them to know that that's not OK. Just not happy about it."

That doesn't mean that Bradley is threatening retaliation in the series finale.

"When we're referring to it, we're not sitting here saying we're going to retaliate or go after their guys," Bradley said. "When a guy has done some damage and you see him get hit, it kind of raises questions. I think the game has matured, and you understand that hitting guys isn't necessarily the best thing. You can injure some guys and put guys in best spots. But at the end of the day, you want to protect your guys, and it was unfortunate and kind of uncalled for."

Steve Gilbert has covered the D-backs for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Paul Goldschmidt