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Hoskins launches first two big league homers

Rookie hit 29 long balls in Triple-A before promotion
MLB.com @ToddZolecki

SAN DIEGO -- Rhys Hoskins said he cannot remember a single thing about his trip around the bases in the fourth inning Monday night at Petco Park.

His memories are a blur.

View Full Game Coverage

SAN DIEGO -- Rhys Hoskins said he cannot remember a single thing about his trip around the bases in the fourth inning Monday night at Petco Park.

His memories are a blur.

View Full Game Coverage

Hoskins hit the first two home runs of his career in the Phillies' 7-4 loss to the Padres. He crushed a solo shot to left field in the fourth and a solo shot to left-center field in the seventh. He is the first Phillies player to hit the first two home runs of his career in the same game since Scott Rolen on Aug. 21, 1996, against the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium.

"I think it's something that, obviously, you dream about," Hoskins said about the first homer. "You dream about getting here. But you dream about hitting a home run here. I don't know. I don't really remember it, to be completely honest."

Hoskins is the No. 71 prospect in baseball, according to MLBPipeline.com. The Phillies promoted him Thursday after hitting a franchise-record 29 home runs with Triple-A Lehigh Valley. He went hitless in his first 12 at-bats before singling Sunday in a loss to the Mets.

Video: PHI@SD: Hoskins clobbers first two career home runs

He lined out in his first at-bat Monday against Padres left-hander Travis Wood, but he ripped a 3-2 fastball off him a projected 410 feet in the fourth, according to Statcast™. The ball left his bat at 110.2 mph, making it the second-hardest homer hit by a Phillies player this season. Tommy Joseph hit one 111.2 mph on June 3 against the Giants.

Hoskins circled the bases as 30 to 40 family and friends cheered for him from the stands. He touched home plate and passed Joseph on the way back to the dugout. Joseph got instructions from the dugout to ignore Hoskins. He did.

"He kind of stone-colded me," Hoskins said. "I immediately knew it was coming. I started laughing."

Hoskins descended the steps into the Phillies dugout and found everybody utterly stoic. Unable to find a friend, Hoskins partied by himself. He high-fived the air about a dozen times, making his way from one end of the dugout to the other.

"I went into the fake handshakes," Hoskins said. "That was fun. Something I'll remember."

"I think that was [bench coach Larry] Bowa's call," Jerad Eickhoff said. "We had it going pretty good."

Finally, Hoskins bashed forearms with Odubel Herrera and Bowa. Moments later Hoskins' teammates converged upon him and celebrated.

Hoskins' second homer in the seventh left his bat at 101 mph and flew a projected 401 feet.

Hoskins got both balls. Padres security got the first one. Phillies bullpen coach John McLaren recovered the second one from a fan. Hoskins met both fans after the game and gave them autographed baseballs as a token of gratitude.

"I was definitely hoping for at least the first one," Hoskins said. "But the fact we were able to get both of them was pretty cool. It's something I'll have for the rest of my life."

Todd Zolecki has covered the Phillies since 2003, and for MLB.com since 2009. Follow him on Twitter and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Philadelphia Phillies, Rhys Hoskins