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Pipeline Q&A: Reds prospect Taylor Trammell

MLB.com @JimCallisMLB

GOODYEAR, Ariz. -- As part of MLB Pipeline's visit to all 30 Spring Training camps, we'll sit down with prospects and get to know them a little better. At Reds camp, it was Cincinnati's No. 3 prospect, Taylor Trammell.

The Georgia 2015 Class A football offensive player of the year after rushing for 2,479 yards and 36 touchdowns as a senior, Trammell had college football opportunities, but opted to concentrate on baseball. Signed for $3.2 million a supplemental first-round pick in 2016, he batted .281/.368/.450 last year in low Class A, ranking second in the Midwest League in walks (71) and steals (41) and fourth in total bases (221).

GOODYEAR, Ariz. -- As part of MLB Pipeline's visit to all 30 Spring Training camps, we'll sit down with prospects and get to know them a little better. At Reds camp, it was Cincinnati's No. 3 prospect, Taylor Trammell.

The Georgia 2015 Class A football offensive player of the year after rushing for 2,479 yards and 36 touchdowns as a senior, Trammell had college football opportunities, but opted to concentrate on baseball. Signed for $3.2 million a supplemental first-round pick in 2016, he batted .281/.368/.450 last year in low Class A, ranking second in the Midwest League in walks (71) and steals (41) and fourth in total bases (221).

• Reds Pipeline report

:: MLB Pipeline Spring Training reports ::

MLB Pipeline: You were an accomplished football player who could have played in college, and your brother Kyle is currently a linebacker at Mercer. Do you miss football?

Trammell: I love watching college football. I love guys my age doing something with their lives and working toward something. That brings joy to my heart. That's awesome. I love watching college football, but playing it? A lot of people ask me that question. I could go out here and play 24 hours of baseball and love it. I could play one hour of football and I'd dread it. The physical toll it takes, it messes some guys up. I can't see my kids going through that.

MLB Pipeline: Going into the spring of your senior year at Mount Paran Christian School (Kennesaw, Ga.), did you have any inkling that your stock as a baseball prospect was going to take off like it did? It seemed most teams regarded you as a third- to fifth-rounder entering the year.

Trammell: I had zero idea. I was a little bit under the radar. Not that many people knew who I was. I always had that chip on my shoulder. I wanted people to understand I was not just a football player playing baseball, or raw because I hadn't focused too much on baseball. If I put my mind to something, I'm going to give it my all.

MLB Pipeline: Where do you think that drive comes from?

Trammell: I've always had the edge that I want to be the best. My dad served nine years in the Navy and then has worked for the Post Office for 20 years. He wakes up at 4:30 every morning. My mom worked for Sam's Club for 21 years, and she worked at my school as a marketer while I was in high school and cleaned a dentist's building, worked two jobs. My brother and I went to private school in high school and that's not cheap. They worked their tails off to put me and my brother in the situations we're in now. He's a mechanical engineering major at Mercer. They put themselves on the back burner so we can shine. I want to help them out so they don't have to lift another finger. My mom's retired now. She works for me. She's my manager. My dad is still working. It's a grind. That's where me and my brother get it from. He works so hard and I want him to enjoy life because he deserves it.

MLB Pipeline: Scouts rave about your ability to do it all -- hit, hit for power, run, play defense. Which part of the game comes easiest to you and which part is hardest?

Trammell: My baserunning comes easiest to me. Trusting my instincts is the hardest part. It's kind of a blessing and a curse. I see something and I take off. I need to hone that, learn when to take the extra base and when to hold back. Well … actually the hardest part is probably my throwing. I've worked hard on it this offseason. I've focused on it every single day. I've worked on my shoulder, my arms, long-tossing. Anything I can do to become better, I'll do it.

MLB Pipeline: Since you've been in pro ball, who has helped you the most?

Trammell: A lot of people will say coaches but for me it's a player, Tyler Stephenson. We went to high school about a mile away from each other. Tyler is a leader. I don't think he knows how big an impact he has on me and a lot of guys. There were times last year where I felt down on myself, and we roomed together and he'd tell me, "You had some good swings, it's going to come." The way he goes about his business, interacts with every single player, you see the major league person in him. Baseball aside, he's just a great person and a genuine guy who cares for everyone.

Jim Callis is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow @jimcallisMLB on Twitter. Listen to him on the weekly Pipeline Podcast.