Globe iconLogin iconRecap iconSearch iconTickets icon
news

MLB News

Inbox: Are Reds open to offers on Iglesias?

Beat reporter Mark Sheldon answers questions from fans
MLB.com @m_sheldon

How likely are the Reds to move Raisel Iglesias? Are any teams willing to pay the price?
-- @DannyMcBrideNM, on Twitter

Because Iglesias is signed to a club-friendly contract ($11.4 million owed over 2019-20) and under control through 2021, the Reds are not shopping him hard -- but they're definitely listening. Zach Britton and Kelvin Herrera are two closers who have already been traded, so Iglesias seems like he would be even more in demand. I know the Astros have been one club with interest, but I can imagine there are others. If Cincinnati is blown away by an offer, president of baseball operations Dick Williams might make a deal. But I also know the Reds want the club to be contending sooner than later. Having Iglesias anchor the bullpen as Cincinnati's closer in '19 would be an important part to reaching that goal.

How likely are the Reds to move Raisel Iglesias? Are any teams willing to pay the price?
-- @DannyMcBrideNM, on Twitter

Because Iglesias is signed to a club-friendly contract ($11.4 million owed over 2019-20) and under control through 2021, the Reds are not shopping him hard -- but they're definitely listening. Zach Britton and Kelvin Herrera are two closers who have already been traded, so Iglesias seems like he would be even more in demand. I know the Astros have been one club with interest, but I can imagine there are others. If Cincinnati is blown away by an offer, president of baseball operations Dick Williams might make a deal. But I also know the Reds want the club to be contending sooner than later. Having Iglesias anchor the bullpen as Cincinnati's closer in '19 would be an important part to reaching that goal.

:: Submit a question to the Reds Inbox ::

Why aren't the Reds more active at the non-waiver Trade Deadline? And why do they seldom try to upgrade the rotation via free agency? Is it just about money?
-- Dale Pearl, via Facebook

On the first question, the Reds have historically made some moves at the Deadline, but lately they've been sellers -- such as the trades that sent Jay Bruce to the Mets in 2016 and Mike Leake to the Giants and Johnny Cueto to the Royals in '15. As a non-contender this season, it'd be hard for Cincinnati to give up talent to be a buyer before this year's Deadline. And because of the improvement since April, the Reds appeared to have to modified how much they are willing to sell.

As for free-agent starters, the market for top-of-the-rotation guys has been cost prohibitive to the point that it seemed more prudent to try to use either homegrown talent or young arms acquired via trades. Great American Ball Park -- a place notorious for home runs -- is also usually not a desired destination for elite starters looking take their career to the next level.

Looking ahead to 2019 and beyond, and with the number of infielder options, what are the chances of moving Jose Peraza to center field? Billy Hamilton made the switch from shortstop to center, and he is one of the best defensive center fielders the Reds have had, but moving Peraza there would give Nick Senzel an open spot in the infield. And Peraza has turned into a much better offensive threat than Hamilton.
-- Carey Keen, via Facebook

I don't think it's going to happen. Peraza has started to show improvement and more comfort playing every day at shortstop, and his bat has improved even more. The Reds tried Senzel at shortstop in Spring Training, and they weren't satisfied enough to believe his future was there. What I wouldn't rule out in 2019 is Cincinnati giving Senzel a look in either left field or center field. He's certainly athletic enough to make the change, even though he's never played either position.

Have any teams expressed interest in acquiring Homer Bailey? He was impressive in his last start.
-- @mikenelson1964, on Twitter

Not that I know of. It would take more than one start for clubs to be convinced because of Bailey's injury history and performance. Of course, there is also the roughly $35 million he is owed through 2019 that makes him nearly impossible to deal, unless the Reds were willing to assume much or most of that money.

I expect the Reds to trade Matt Harvey and think they should, but have you heard anything about them possibly keeping him around?
-- @Nick_Howell2, on Twitter

I imagine if the Reds' front office was dissatisfied with the Harvey offers, it could keep him for the rest of the season. But the odds of re-signing him as a free agent seem pretty low, so it only makes sense for Cincinnati to take whatever it can get for him now.

What is the feel of the pitchers for Jim Riggelman's managing style? He seems to value his bullpen over his starting pitching.
-- @bighouse5541, on Twitter

Riggleman makes no apologies for leaning hard on his bullpen, and he hasn't been afraid to ruffle the feathers of starters with quick hooks. But the results have backed him up. The rotation has the highest ERA in the National League and routinely gets hit hard the third time through the lineup. The bottom line: Riggleman wants to win and is doing everything he can to do that. If starters pitch better, they would stay in more games longer.

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds